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Corporate Communication

Purpose of Course  showclose

The introduction of Business Communication for Success, the textbook used throughout this course, notes that “[E]ffective communication takes preparation, practice, and persistence.  There are many ways to learn communication skills; the school of experience, or ‘hard knocks,’ is one of them.  But in the business environment, a ‘knock’ (or lesson learned) may come at the expense of your credibility through a blown presentation to a client.” Effective communication skills are a prerequisite for succeeding in business.  Communication tools and activities connect people within and beyond the organization in order to establish the business’s place in the corporate community and the social community, and as a result, that communication needs to be consistent, effective, and customized for the business to prosper.  Business Communication for Success provides theories and practical information that represent the heart of this course, while additional resources are included to expand or pose alternatives to the approaches chosen in the textbook.  You will receive maximum benefits from this course if you complete the readings first and then use the additional resources to fill in the blanks and/or reconsider the topics in the textbook.

This course provides students the opportunity to earn actual college credit. It has been reviewed and recommended for 3 credit hours by The National College Credit Recommendation Service (NCCRS).  While credit is not guaranteed at all schools, we have partnered with a number of schools who have expressed their willingness to accept transfer of credits earned through Saylor. You can read more about our NCCRS program here.

National College Credit Recommendation Service

Course Information  showclose

Welcome to BUS210.  Below, please find general information on the course and its requirements.

Course Designer: Dr. P. Wynn Norman

Primary Resources: This course is composed of a range of different free, online materials.  However, the course makes considerable use of the following materials:
Requirements for Completion: In order to complete this course, you will need to work through each unit and all of its assigned materials.  Pay special attention to Unit 5, which covers the written communication formats most commonly used by businesses.  You will also need to complete:
  • Subunit 5.1: “Text, E-mail, and Netiquette” – provides information helpful to completing the Email Assignment
  • Subunit 5.2: “Memorandums and Letters” – provides information helpful to completing the Memorandum and Business Letter Assignments
  • Subunit 5.5: “Résumés” – provides information helpful to completing the Résumé Assignment
  • Subunit 5.6: “Sales Messages” – provides information helpful to completing the Sales Letter Assignment
  • Final Exam
Time Commitment: This course should take you approximately 119 hours to complete, including the assignments and Final Exam.  Each unit includes a “time advisory” that lists the amount of time you are expected to spend on each subunit.  These should help you plan your time accordingly.  It may be useful to take a look at these time advisories to determine how much time you have over the next few weeks to complete each unit, and then to set goals for yourself.  For example, Unit 1 should take you approximately 5.25 hours to complete.  Perhaps, you can complete subunits 1.1 and 1.2 (a total of 2.75 hours) on Monday night; subunits 1.3 and 1.4 (a total of 2.5 hours) on Tuesday night; etc.  Ideally, you should study on successive nights when you know you will not be disturbed by other engagements. 

Tips/Suggestions: Writing is an essential business skill because it not only enables you to communicate effectively, but the quality of your writing is also seen as a stand-in for the quality of your product or service: It contributes to your business’ image.  If you are uncertain about the quality of your writing, you might want to participate in OpenStudy, a free study group website in which individuals voluntarily provide feedback in response to users’ questions about writing.  Yahoo Answers’ “Homework Help” category, or its “Marketing & Advertising,” “Small Business” and “Business and Finance” categories, may also enable you to get feedback on your writing.

 
A version of this course is also available in iTunes U.
Preview the course in your browser or view our entire suite of iTunes U courses.  

Learning Outcomes  showclose

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  • Explain why effective communication is important in a corporate environment.
  • Apply theories and observations of verbal communication to real-world communication challenges.
  • Use information about perceptions to analyze themselves and also the audiences to which businesses distribute messages.
  • Critique common formats of written business communication by recognizing standard and nonstandard elements in examples of each format.
  • Create business presentations that use verbal and nonverbal communication techniques effectively.
  • Recognize the importance of intrapersonal and interpersonal communication in business environments.
  • Recognize the impact of cultural differences on effective communication and understand the steps to becoming acculturated for international assignments.
  • Prepare a crisis communication plan and know how to give and receive negative news.
  • Use an understanding of groups, teams, and leadership to explain how to solve problems and run productive meetings.  

Course Requirements  showclose

In order to take this course, you must:

√    Have access to a computer.

√    Have continuous broadband Internet access.

√    Have the ability/permission to install plug-ins or software (e.g., Adobe Reader or Flash).

√    Have the ability to download and save files and documents to a computer.

√    Have the ability to open Microsoft files and documents (.doc, .ppt, .xls, etc.).

√    Have competency in the English language.

√    Have read the Saylor Student Handbook.

√    Have completed ENGL001 and ENGL002.

Preliminary Information

  • Business Communication for Success

    You will be prompted to read sections of this book throughout the course. You can download the text in full now and skip to the appropriate section as prompted by the instructions in the resource boxes below.

    Reading: Business Communication for Success (PDF)

    Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

Unit Outline show close


Expand All Resources Collapse All Resources
  • Unit 1: Introduction to Business Communication  

    In this unit, you will gain a better understanding of how communication forms a part of your self-concept, helping you understand yourself and others, solve problems and learn new things, and build your career.  You will learn about the transactional and constructivist models of the communication process as well as the eight most widely recognized elements involved in that process.  You will also learn to distinguish the four audience-based contexts of communication and will discover the challenges in framing business communication, which is ethical and effective.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 1.1 Why Is It Important to Communicate Well?  
  • 1.1.1 Communication Influences Your Thinking of Yourself and Others  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 1.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Communication Influences Your Thinking of Your Self and Others.”

  • 1.1.2 Communication Influences How You Learn  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 1.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Communication Influences How You Learn.”

  • 1.1.3 Communication Represents You and Your Employer  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 1.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Communication Represents You and Your Employer.”

  • 1.1.4 Communication Skills Are Desired by Business and Industry  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 1.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Communication Skills Are Desired by Business and Industry.”

  • 1.2 What Is Communication?  
  • 1.2.1 Communication Influences Your Thinking of Yourself and Others  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 1.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Communication Influences Your Thinking of Your Self and Others.”

  • 1.2.2 Defining Communication  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 1.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Defining Communication.”

  • 1.2.3 Eight Essential Components of Communication  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 1.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Eight Essential Components of Communication.”

  • 1.2.4 Two Models of Communication  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 1.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Two Models of Communication.”

  • 1.3 Communication in Context  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: “Chapter 1: Effective Business Communication: Section 3: Communication in Context”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: Effective Business Communication: “Section 3: Communication in Context” (PDF)
       
      Instructions: Please read this entire webpage.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 22 and read pages 22-25.  This section introduces intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, public, and mass communication, including their advantages and disadvantages as well as appropriate and inappropriate uses.  After reading the text, make sure to try the exercises at the bottom of the page.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 1.3.1 through 1.3.5.
       
      This reading and exercises should take approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

    • Lecture: The Saylor Foundation: University of Calgary’s Dr. Derrick M. Nault’s “Culture, Context, Communication and Power”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation: University of Calgary’s Dr. Derrick M. Nault’s “Culture, Context, Communication and Power” (YouTube)
       
      Instructions: Please watch this entire video (approximately 9 minutes), in which Dr. Nault and his class discuss the situational connectedness of culture, influence, and communication while viewing video clips and images that illustrate the nature of those interrelationships.  Focus on the content of the discussion and not the black and white text from students praising the presenter between each segment.  In the first film analyzed, think about the differences between Australian and Japanese culture.  In the second clip presented, remember that the length and degree a person bows in Japanese culture has a correlation to individual status.  The lower one person chooses to bow, the more respect he or she has for the individual receiving the bow.  In the last clip discussed, consider the impact of brevity on the communication and creation of new ideas.  Can this influence the way we think?  Consider the role of culture, context, and brevity on communication.
       
      This video lecture and these questions should take you approximately 15 minutes to complete. 
       
      Terms of Use: This work has been reposted by the kind permission of Dr. D.M. Nault.  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 1.3.1 Intrapersonal Communication  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 1.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Intrapersonal Communication.”

  • 1.3.2 Interpersonal Communication  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 1.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Interpersonal Communication.”

  • 1.3.3 Group Communication  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 1.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Group Communication.”

  • 1.3.4 Public Communication  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 1.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Public Communication.”

  • 1.3.5 Mass Communication  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 1.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Mass Communication.”

  • 1.4 Your Responsibilities as a Communicator  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: “Chapter 1: Effective Business Communication: Section 4: Your Responsibilities as a Communicator”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: Effective Business Communication: “Section 4: Your Responsibilities as a Communicator” (PDF)
       
      Instructions: Please read “Section 4: Your Responsibilities as a Communicator” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 26 and read pages 26-31, or click on the link above to download the textbook now. This section addresses the reader as a communicator, emphasizing how good communicators are prepared and ethical.  At the end of the reading, attempt the exercises.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 1.4.1 through 1.4.9.
       
      This reading and exercises should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

    • Lecture: YouTube: abcminds’ “The NLP Communication Model”

      Link: YouTube: abcminds’ “The NLP Communication Model” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please watch this entire video (approximately 5 minutes) to continue learning about the theories behind communication in order to recognize the factors that influence your communication effectiveness and reactions to communication stimuli.  The neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) model introduced in the video focuses on physical elements of communication to explain how the mind filters the information we receive externally and internally.  Awareness of these factors can help a communicator overcome his or her negative impacts.  After you view this video, try to write a paragraph that summarizes the NLP Communication Model.

      This lecture and paragraph should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.4.1 Be Prepared  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 1.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Communicator Is Prepared.”

  • 1.4.2 Be Organized  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 1.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “The Prepared Communicator Is Organized.”

  • 1.4.3 Be Clear  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 1.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “The Prepared Communicator Is Clear.”

  • 1.4.4 Be Concise and Punctual  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 1.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “The Prepared Communicator Is Concise and Punctual.”

  • 1.4.5 Be Ethical  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 1.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Communicator Is Ethical.”

  • 1.4.6 Be Egalitarian  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 1.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “The Ethical Communicator Is Egalitarian.”

  • 1.4.7 Be Respectful  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 1.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “The Ethical Communicator Is Respectful.”

  • 1.4.8 Be Trustworthy  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 1.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “The Ethical Communicator Is Trustworthy.”

  • 1.4.9 The “Golden Rule”  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 1: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 1.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “The Golden Rule.”

  • The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 1 Assessment”  
  • Unit 2: Delivering Your Message  

    In this unit, you will focus on the importance of delivering your message in words, including how the characteristics of language interact in ways that can improve and diminish effective business communication.  Language plays a significant role in how you perceive and interact with the world as well as how culture, language, education, gender, race, and ethnicity all influence this dynamic process.  Through this unit, you will discover ways to avoid miscommunication and also identify constructive ways to deliver an accurate message to a targeted audience.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 2.1 What Is Language?  
  • 2.2 Messages  
  • 2.2.1 Primary Language Is Not the Whole Message  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 2.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Primary Language Is Not the Whole Message.”

  • 2.2.2 Parts of a Message  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 2.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Parts of a Message.”

  • 2.3 Principles of Verbal Communication  
  • 2.3.1 Language Has Rules  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 2.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Language Has Rules.”

  • 2.3.2 Our Reality Is Shaped by Our Language  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 2.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Our Reality Is Shaped by Our Language.”

  • 2.3.3 Language is Arbitrary and Symbolic  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 2.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Language Is Arbitrary and Symbolic.”

  • 2.3.4 Language Is Abstract  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 2.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Language Is Abstract.”

  • 2.3.5 Language Is Organized and Classifies Reality  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 2.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Language Is Organized and Classifies Reality.”

  • 2.4 Language Can Be an Obstacle to Communication  
  • 2.4.1 Cliché  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 2.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Cliché.”

  • 2.4.2 Jargon  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 2.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Jargon.”

  • 2.4.3 Slang  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 2.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Slang.”

  • 2.4.4 Sexist and Racist Language  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 2.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Sexist and Racist Language.”

  • 2.4.5 Euphemisms  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 2.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Euphemisms.”

  • 2.4.6 Doublespeak  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 2.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Doublespeak.”

  • 2.5 Emphasis Strategies  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: Delivering Your Message: “Section 5: Emphasis Strategies”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: Delivering Your Message: “Section 5: Emphasis Strategies” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 5: Emphasis Strategies” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 54 and read pages 54-57, or clikc on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section describes communication tactics that can be used to emphasize a message or parts of a message: visuals, signposts, reviews, previews, and repetition.  At the end of the reading, attempt the exercises.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 2.5.1 through 2.5.4.

      This reading and exercises should take approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Valerie Gray’s “Positive Emphasis and You Attitude Exercises”

      Link: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Valerie Gray’s “Positive Emphasis and You Attitude Exercises” (iTunes U)
       
      Instructions: Please scroll down the webpage to the lecture titled “Positive Emphasis and You Attitude Exercises” (8/31/09), and select “View in iTunes” to launch the lecture.  Then, listen to this entire lecture (approximately 5 minutes), which describes how a good communicator uses positive language and focuses on the audience’s needs to emphasize key points in messages.  After viewing this lecture, write a paragraph that describes how you can use positive emphasis to successfully communicate.
       
      This lecture and paragraph should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.5.1 Visual Communication  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 2.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Visual Communication.”

  • 2.5.2 Signposts  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 2.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Signposts.”

  • 2.5.3 Internal Summaries and Foreshadowing  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 2.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Internal Summaries and Foreshadowing.”

  • 2.5.4 Repetition  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 2.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Repetition.”

  • 2.6 Improving Verbal Communication  
  • 2.6.1 Define Your Terms  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 2.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Define Your Terms.”

  • 2.6.2 Choose Precise Words  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 2.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Choose Precise Words.”

  • 2.6.3 Consider Your Audience  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 2.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Consider Your Audience.”

  • 2.6.4 Take Control of Your Tone  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 2.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Take Control of Your Tone.”

  • 2.6.5 Check for Understanding  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 2.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Check for Understanding.”

  • 2.6.6 Be Results Oriented  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 2: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 2.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Be Results Oriented.”

  • The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 2 Assessment”  
  • Unit 3: Understanding Your Audience  

    In this unit, you will discover how your self-awareness and how others view you influence your effectiveness as a communicator.  Moreover, because of how people select, organize, and interpret words and idea results in preconceived notions and individual differences, audience analysis is also a vital part of crafting messages.  This is why, in this unit, you will learn how to analyze yourself and your audience to maximize how you develop and distribute information.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 3.1 Self-Understanding Is Fundamental to Communication  
  • 3.1.1 Self-Concept  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 3.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Self-Concept.”

  • 3.1.2 Attitudes, Beliefs, and Values  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 3.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Attitudes, Beliefs, and Values.”

  • 3.1.3 Self-Image and Self-Esteem  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 3.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Self-Image and Self-Esteem.”

  • 3.1.4 Looking-Glass Self  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 3.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Looking-Glass Self.”

  • 3.1.5 Self-Fulfilling Prophecy  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 3.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Self-Fulfilling Prophecy.”

  • 3.2 Perception  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: Understanding Your Audience: “Section 2: Perception”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: Understanding Your Audience: “Section 2: Perception” (PDF)
       
      Instructions: Please read “Section 2: Perception” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 74 and read pages 74-86, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section explains in depth how we select, organize, and interpret words and ideas based on a perceptual framework shaped by our expectations and assumptions.  At the end of the reading, attempt the exercises.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 3.2.1 through 3.2.3.
       
      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Laura Davis’ “Perception and Communication”

      Link: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Laura Davis’ “Perception and Communication” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down the webpage to the lecture titled “Perception and Communication,” and select “View in iTunes” to launch the lecture.  Then, listen to this entire lecture (approximately 7 minutes), which reinforces the content in Business Communication for Success and provides additional explanation and illustrations.  Taking notes and viewing the lecture should take approximately 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.2.1 Selection  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 3.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Selection.”

  • 3.2.2 Organization  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 3.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Organization.”

  • 3.2.3 Interpretation  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 3.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Interpretation.”

  • 3.3 Differences in Perception  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: “Chapter 3: Understanding Your Audience: Section 3: Differences in Perception”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: Understanding Your Audience: Section 3: “Differences in Perception” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 3: Differences in Perception” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 86 and read pages 86-88, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This brief section focuses on the individual differences and preconceived notions that can limit how well we work with others.  The main point of this section is to emphasize how understanding about each other can positively impact our communication and improve the degree to which we can share and understand meaning across languages, cultures, and divergent perspectives.  At the end of this reading, try to complete the exercises.  Note that this reading covers the topic outlined in sub-subunits 3.3.1 and 3.3.2.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee.

    • Lecture: YouTube: Dr. Don Wicker's “Organizational Behavior Lecture 3”

      Link: YouTube: Dr. Don Wicker’s “Organizational Behavior Lecture 3” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please watch this entire video (approximately 4 minutes), in which Dr. Wicker reviews many of the same elements in the perceptual process as in Business Communication for Success by using several clarifying graphics.  Dr. Wicker also introduces the concept of attribution (how individuals perceive cause and effect) and revisits the “halo effect” – the self-fulfilling prophecies reviewed in subunit 3.1.  After you complete the lecture, try to write a summary of the main concepts that Dr. Wicker discussed.

      This lecture and paragraph should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: YouTube: Do the Test’s “Test Your Awareness”

      Link: YouTube: Do the Test’s “Test Your Awareness” (YouTube)

      Instructions: View the brief, 1-minute lecture.  See if you reach the same number as the narrator and then reflect on what this demonstrates about perception and communication.  Consider this video in the context of the perception lectures listed above and below.  How can you use your own traits to evaluate factors that contribute to self-concept?  For example, if you have the perceived trait of patience, does this impact how you view yourself?  How might this perceived trait impact your communication with others?  The “awareness test” is a way to challenge our perceptual traits, and allow us to question those traits to gain greater self-knowledge.

      You should spend approximately 15 minutes viewing this lecture and answering the questions above.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.3.1 Why Don’t We All See Eye to Eye?  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 3.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Why Don’t We All See Eye to Eye.”

  • 3.3.2 Individual Differences in Perception  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 3.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Individual Differences in Perception.”

  • 3.4 Getting to Know Your Audience  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: “Chapter 3: Understanding Your Audience: Section 4: Getting to Know Your Audience”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: Understanding Your Audience: Section 4: “Getting to Know Your Audience” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 4: Getting to Know Your Audience” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 88 and read pages 88-94, or click on the above link to download the textbook now. This section presents an important table of perceptual strategies you can use to overcome some of the perceptual issues that can handicap a communicator’s ability to understand audiences – a necessary ingredient in customizing messages to be effective with specific audiences.  At the end of the reading, attempt the exercises.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 3.4.1 through 3.4.3.

      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Missouri State University: Gary Phillips’ “Chapter 5” and University of Arizona, Department of Communications: Dr. Randolph Accetta’s “Engaging the Audience”

      Link: iTunes U: Missouri State University: Gary Phillips’ “Chapter 5” (iTunes U) and University of Arizona, Department of Communications: Dr. Randolph Accetta’s “Engaging the Audience” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down the webpage to “Chapter 5” for the Phillips lecture and “Engaging the Audience” for Dr. Accetta’s lecture, and select “View in iTunes” to launch the lectures about audience analysis.  Then, listen to these entire lectures (approximately 27 minutes and 7 minutes, respectively).  Phillips reinforces the content in Business Communication for Success, while Dr. Accetta’s approach refocuses the topic of audience analysis on using audience traits to keep customers and other stakeholders interested and involved in business-oriented messages.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

  • 3.4.1 Demographic Traits  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 3.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Demographic Traits.”

  • 3.4.2 Improving Your Perceptions of Your Audience  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 3.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Improving Your Perceptions of Your Audience.”

  • 3.4.3 Fairness in Communication  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 3.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Fairness in Communication.”

  • 3.5 Listening and Reading for Understanding  
  • 3.5.1 Listening vs. Hearing  

    Note: This topic is covered by Wrench, Goding, Johnson, and Attias’ Stand Up, Speak Out: “Chapter 4” introduction reading assigned below subunit 4.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Listening vs. Hearing.”

  • 3.5.2 Benefits of Listening  

    Note: This topic is covered by Wrench, Goding, Johnson, and Attias’ Stand Up, Speak Out: “Chapter 4” introduction reading assigned below subunit 4.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Benefits of Listening.”

  • 3.5.3 Active Listening and Reading  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 3.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Active Listening and Reading.”

  • 3.5.4 Tips for Dealing with Difficult Subjects  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 3: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 3.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “When the Going Gets Tough.”

  • The Saylor Foundation's "Unit 3 Assessment"  
  • Unit 4: Effective Business Writing  

    In this unit, you will explore the written word in a business context, including the important but contrastingly asynchronous elements which that communication shares with oral communication.  Successful writing develops from such good habits as reading, targeted writing practice, and critical thinking and is characterized by the use of rhetorical and cognitive strategies.  Accordingly, you will learn to apply appropriate styles and ethical principles in various business writing contexts while recognizing the kinds of barriers that can challenge your communication objectives and outcomes.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 4.1 Oral vs. Written Communication  
  • 4.2 How Is Writing Learned?  
  • 4.2.1 Reading  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 4.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Reading.”

  • 4.2.2 Writing  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 4.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Writing.”

  • 4.2.3 Constructive Criticism and Targeted Practice  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 4.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Constructive Criticism and Targeted Practice.”

  • 4.2.4 Critical Thinking  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 4.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Critical Thinking.”

  • 4.3 Good Writing  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: Effective Business Writing: “Section 3: Good Writing”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: Effective Business Writing: “Section 3: Good Writing” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 3: Good Writing” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 107 and read pages 107-112, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section gives you an overview of the characteristics of good writing, including an important discussion of why and how the traits of good writing promote understanding as well as a table that provides examples of how rhetorical elements and cognate strategies relate to business communication practices.  Attempt the exercises at the end of the reading; instead of sharing your responses with your classmates, try to share your work with a family member or friend.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 4.3.1 and 4.3.2.

      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: YouTube: Dr. Steven R. Van Hook's “Effective Writing Skills”

      Link: YouTube: Dr. Steven R. Van Hook’s “Effective Writing Skills” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please watch this entire video (approximately 10 minutes), which gets quickly to the point that using strong subjects, verbs, and other audience-centered sentence structures produces understanding more quickly and with less effort from audiences.  After you view this video, take about 5 minutes to write a brief summary of the main ideas you learned from this lecture.

      This lecture and summary should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Valerie Gray's “Common Writing Errors”

      Link: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Valerie Gray’s “Common Writing Errors” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down the “Common Writing Errors” (8/27/09), and select “View in iTunes” to launch the lecture.  Then, listen to this entire lecture (approximately 12 minutes), which addresses such writing errors as faulty agreement, passive voice, and dangling modifiers and how they can influence the effectiveness of business communication.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.3.1 More Qualities of Good Writing  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 4.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “More Qualities of Good Writing.”

  • 4.3.2 Rhetorical Elements and Cognate Strategies  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 4.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Rhetorical Elements and Cognate Strategies.”
     

  • 4.4 Style in Written Communication  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: Effective Business Writing: “Section 4: Style in Written Communication”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: Effective Business Writing: Section 4: “Style in Written Communication” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 4: Style in Written Communication” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 112 and read pages 112-116, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section categorizes writing styles as colloquial, casual, informal, or formal and indicates when and where each style is appropriate.  At the end of the reading, attempt the exercises.  For any exercises that require the involvement of classmates, instead try to partner with a friend or family member.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 4.4.1 through 4.4.3.

      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Online College: Business Communication: “Week 2 Lecture”

      Link: iTunes U: Online College: Business Communication: “Week 2 Lecture” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Click on “View in iTunes” for this lecture.  Please listen to this entire lecture (approximately 13 minutes) for an efficient review of how to edit your writing for style, accuracy, and content.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.4.1 Colloquial  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 4.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Colloquial.”

  • 4.4.2 Casual  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 4.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Casual.”

  • 4.4.3 Formal  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 4.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Formal.”

  • 4.5 Principles of Written Communication  
    • Lecture: Swineburn University of Technology: Chris Galloway's “Public Relations Writing”

      Link: Swineburn University of Technology: Chris Galloway’s “Public Relations Writing” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down to the “Public Relations Writing” lecture, select “View in iTunes,” and then listen to this entire lecture (approximately 14 minutes).  This lecture has been included in this course because audience-centered business writing is public relations writing.  This lecture also gives you a greater appreciation for why public relations principles are business writing principles, especially when external audiences are being targeted.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: Effective Business Writing: “Section 5: Principles of Written Communication”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: Effective Business Writing: “Section 5: Principles of Written Communication” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 5: Principles of Written Communication” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 116 and read pages 116-121, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section applies to words many of the same concepts that were applied to language in Chapter 2: Words are governed by rules, shape reality, and have ethical dimensions (e.g., plagiarism and libel).  At the end of this reading, try to complete the exercises.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 4.5.1 through 4.5.4.

      This reading and exercises should take you approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

  • 4.5.1 Words Are Inherently Abstract  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 4.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Words Are Inherently Abstract.”

  • 4.5.2 Words Are Governed by Rules  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 4.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Words Are Governed by Rules.”

  • 4.5.3 Words Shape Our Reality  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 4.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Words Shape Our Reality.”

  • 4.5.4 Words and Your Legal Responsibility  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 4.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Words and Your Legal Responsibility.”

  • 4.6 Overcoming Barriers to Effective Written Communication  
  • 4.6.1 Do Sweat the Small Stuff  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 4.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Do Sweat the Small Stuff.”

  • 4.6.2 Get the Target Meaning  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 4.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Get the Target Meaning.”

  • 4.6.3 Consider the Nonverbal Aspects of Your Message  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 4.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Consider the Nonverbal Aspects of Your Message.”

  • 4.6.4 Review, Reflect, and Revise  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 4: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 4.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Review, Reflect, and Revise.”

  • The Saylor Foundation's "Unit 4 Assessment"  
  • Unit 5: Business Writing in Action  

    In this unit, you will survey the most common written communication formats that represent you and your business, focusing on the content, design, utilization, and social customs associated with each format.  You will become more familiar with the different elements included in each format and the functions they perform with respect to crafting messages that have specific goals and are thus tailored to influence specific audiences.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 5.1 Text, E-mail, and Netiquette  
  • 5.1.1 Texting  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 9.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Texting.”

  • 5.1.2 E-mail  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 9.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “E-mail.”

  • 5.1.3 Netiquette  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 9.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Netiquette.”

  • 5.2 Memorandums and Letters  
  • 5.2.1 Memos  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 9.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Memos.”

  • 5.2.2 Letters  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 9.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Letters.”

  • 5.3 Business Proposals  
  • 5.3.1 Common Proposal Elements  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 9.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Common Proposal Elements.”

  • 5.3.2 Two Types of Business Proposals  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 9.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Two Types of Business Proposals.”

  • 5.3.3 Sample Business Proposal  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 9.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Sample Business Proposal.”

  • 5.4 Reports  
  • 5.4.1 What Is a Report?  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 9.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “What Is a Report?”

  • 5.4.2 Types of Reports  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 9.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Types of Reports.”

  • 5.4.3 How Are Reports Organized?  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 9.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “How Are Reports Organized?”

  • 5.5 Résumés  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: Business Writing in Action: “Section 5: Résumé”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: Business Writing in Action: “Section 5: Résumé (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 5: Résumé” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 289 and read pages 289-298, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section provides the reasoning, guidance, and examples for how to create an acceptable résumé.  Attempt the exercises at the end of the reading.  For any exercise that requires involvement from classmates, instead try to work with friends or family members.  Note this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 5.5.1 and 5.5.2.

      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: YouTube: Rich Farina's “Writing Your Résumé Cover Letter” and “Writing Your Résumé”

      Link: YouTube: Rich Farina's “Writing Your Résumé Cover Letter” (YouTube) and “Writing Your Résumé” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please watch these entire videos (approximately 4 minutes each) to reinforce and further visualize the materials covered in this subunit.  After viewing this video, take approximately 5-7 minutes to write a summary of developing a résumé and cover letter.

      This lecture and summary should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Valerie Gray's “Résumé and Cover Letter – 2”

      Link: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Valerie Gray's “Résumé and Cover Letter – 2” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down the webpage to the “Résumé and Cover Letter” (6/24/09), select “View in iTunes,” and then listen to this entire lecture (approximately 11 minutes), which reinforces this unit’s reading material.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s "Résumé Assessment"

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Résumé Assessment (PDF)

      Instructions: Review Section 5 in Chapter 9 of Business Communication for Success, and then produce a résumé based on information about a hypothetical the job seeker.  Open the link above for detailed instructions and content.  When you have completed your version of the job seeker’s résumé, compare your work to The Saylor Foundation’s “Résumé Assessment Answer Key” (PDF).

      Realize, however, that there can be many options for selecting and presenting information in a résumé, so the résumé you produce will not be the same as the example.  If you discover significant differences between the example and your work, use the following set of evaluation questions to critique your version:

      • Did you break the content into blocks and lists preceded by easy-to-understand, hierarchical headings with similar grammatical structures for each heading level?
      • Did your résumé include consistent content and formatting across all heading levels?
      • Are the details you included prioritized such that the most impressive are presented first and the least impressive last (or were omitted)?
      • Did you use bulleted lists, white space, and text treatments like boldface and italics to highlight information and ensure that the résumé can be reviewed and understood easily?
      You should spend approximately 1 hour on this assessment.

      Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License (HTML), it is attributed to The Saylor Foundation. 

    • Lecture: The Saylor Foundation’s “Résumés”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Résumés” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please watch the entire video (4:27)

      Terms of Use: The resource above is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License (HTML).  It is attributed to The Saylor Foundation.

  • 5.5.1 Main Parts of a Résumé  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 9.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Main Parts of a Résumé.”

  • 5.5.2 Maximize Scannable Résumé Content  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 9.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Maximize Scannable Résumé Content.”

  • 5.6 Sales Messages  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: Business Writing in Action: “Section 6: Sales Message”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: Business Writing in Action: Section 6: “Sales Message” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 6: Sales Message” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 298 and read pages 298-302, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section discusses how a sales message combines emotion and reason and reinforces credibility to create interest in a product or service that leads to a sale.  Attempt the exercises at the end of the reading; for any exercise that requires classmate involvement, try to work with a friend or family member instead.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 5.6.1 and 5.6.2.

      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: YouTube: Simon Bell's “How to Write a Sales Letter, Effective Marketing Letter”

      Link: YouTube: Simon Bell's “How to Write a Sales Letter, Effective Marketing Letter” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please watch this entire video (approximately 5 minutes), which reinforces the materials covered in this unit, shows additional examples, and focuses on the distinct parts of the sales message and their development.  Viewing this lecture and taking notes as you view the video should take less than 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Sales Letter Assessment”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s Sales Letter Assessment (PDF)

      Instructions: Review Section 6 in Chapter 9 of Business Communication for Success, paying particular attention to Table 9.6: The Five Main Parts of a Persuasive Message.  Open the link for further instructions.  This assessment involves inserting words, phrases and statements into a sales letter to enhance the impact of each part of the pitch.  When you have finished filling in the blanks, compare your work to The Saylor Foundation’s “Sales Letter Assessment Answer Key” (PDF).  Realize, however, that there can be many options for selecting and presenting information in a sales letter, so the letter you produce will not be the same as the example.  However, if upon comparing your work with the example, you are not satisfied with what you produced, consider replacing the content in the example with alternatives that are equally effective.  This additional exercise may help you recognize better the range of language that can be used.

      This assessment should take approximately 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License (HTML), it is attributed to The Saylor Foundation. 

  • 5.6.1 Format for a Common Sales Message  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 9.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Common Proposal Elements.”

  • 5.6.2 Sales Message Strategies for Success  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 9.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Sales Message Strategies for Success.”

  • The Saylor Foundation's “Unit 5 Assessment”  
  • Unit 6: Developing Business Presentations  

    In this unit, you will become more knowledgeable about the process of creating a speech and gain confidence in your organizational abilities.  Preparation and organization are two main areas that, when well-developed prior to a presentation, significantly contribute to reducing your level of speech anxiety.  From choosing a topic to finding and evaluating resources as well as avoiding such communication obstacles as cultural perceptions and ethnocentrism, you will become more secure in the decision-making processes that lead to effective oral presentations for a variety of audience types.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 6.1 Before You Choose a Topic  
  • 6.1.1 Determine the General and Specific Purpose  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 10.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Determine the General and Specific Purpose.”

  • 6.1.2 Can I Cover the Topic in Time?  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 10.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Can I Cover the Topic in Time?”

  • 6.1.3 Will My Topic Be Interesting to My Audience?  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 10.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Will My Topic Be Interesting to My Audience?”

  • 6.1.4 How Much Information about My Topic Is Readily Available?  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 10.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “How Much Information about My Topic Is Readily Available?”

  • 6.1.5 Putting It All Together  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 10.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Putting It All Together.”

  • 6.2 Choosing a Topic  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: Developing Business Presentations: “Section 2: Choosing a Topic”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: Developing Business Presentations: “Section 2: Choosing a Topic” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 2: Choosing a Topic” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 311 and read pages 311-317, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section describes how choosing a speech topic involves knowing yourself and your audience; using efficient strategies; and understanding appeal, appropriateness, and ability.  These are also steps that will lead to the development of an effective thesis statement.  Attempt the exercises at the end of the reading; for any exercise that requires classmate involvement, try to work with a family member or friend instead.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 6.2.1 through 6.2.5.

      This reading and these exercises should take you approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Missouri State University: Gary Phillips’ “Selecting a Topic”

      Link: iTunes U: Missouri State University: Gary Phillips’ “Selecting a Topic” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down to the “Chapter 4” lecture, select “View in iTunes,” and then listen to this entire lecture (approximately 17 minutes), which reinforces the material in this unit’s readings.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 6.2.1 Know Yourself and Your Audience  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 10.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Know Yourself and Your Audience.”

  • 6.2.2 Saving Time  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 10.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Saving Time.”

  • 6.2.3 Appeal, Appropriateness, and Ability  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 10.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Appeal, Appropriateness, and Ability.”

  • 6.2.4 Use Your Self-Inventory  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 10.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Use Your Self-Inventor.”

  • 6.2.5 Writing Your Thesis Statement  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 10.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Writing Your Thesis Statement.”

  • 6.3 Finding Resources  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: Developing Business Presentations: “Section 3: Finding Resources”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: Developing Business Presentations: “Section 3: Finding Resources (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 3: Finding Resources” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 317 and read pages 317-328, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section provides guidance on identifying the key points of a speech, which require supporting details from good sources.  It also emphasizes the ethical way to find and use sources for a presentation, including how to avoiding plagiarism and how to evaluate sources for reliability and credibility.  Attempt the exercises at the end of the reading; for any exercise that requires classmate involvement, try to work with a family member or friend instead.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 6.3.1 through 6.3.7.

      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Missouri State University: Gary Phillips’ “Doing Research”

      Link: iTunes U: Missouri State University: Gary Phillips’ “Doing Research (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down to the “Chapter 6 & 7” lecture, select “View in iTunes,” and then listen to this entire lecture (approximately 45 minutes), which reinforces the material in this unit’s readings.

       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 6.3.1 Narrow Your Topic and Focus on Key Points  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 10.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Narrow Your Topic and Focus on Key Points.”

  • 6.3.2 Plan Your Search for Information  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 10.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Plan Your Search for Information.”

  • 6.3.3 Ethics, Content Selection, and Avoiding Plagiarism  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 10.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Ethics, Content Selection, and Avoiding Plagiarism.”

  • 6.3.4 Staying Organized  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 10.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Staying Organized.”

  • 6.3.5 Searching for Information on the Internet  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 10.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Searching for Information on the Internet.”

  • 6.3.6 Evaluating Your Sources  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 10.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Evaluating Your Sources.”

  • 6.3.7 Compiling Your Information  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 10.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Compiling Your Information.”

  • 6.4 Myths and Realities of Public Speaking  
  • 6.4.1 Speaking in Public Is Not Like Killing Lions  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 10.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Speaking in Public Is Not Like Killing Lions.”

  • 6.4.2 You Don’t Have to Be Perfect  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 10.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “You Don’t Have to Be Perfect.”

  • 6.4.3 Organization Is Key to Success  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 10.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Organization Is Key to Success.”

  • 6.4.4 Speaking in Public Is Like Participating in a Conversation  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 10.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Speaking in Public Is Like Participating in a Conversation.”

  • 6.5 Overcoming Obstacles in Your Presentation  
  • 6.5.1 Language  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 10.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Language.”

  • 6.5.2 Nature of Perception  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 10.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Nature of Perception.”

  • 6.5.3 Ethnocentrism  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 10: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 10.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Ethnocentrism.”

  • 6.6 Cultural Differences and How They Impede Cross Cultural Communication  
    • Lecture: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Laura Davis’ “Culture and Communication”

      Link: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Laura Davis’ “Culture and Communication” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down to the “Culture and Communication” (12/18/09) lecture, select “View in iTunes,” and then listen to this entire lecture (approximately 12 minutes), which discusses how culture impacts communication.  While this may seem like the same subject covered in subunit 2.4, the content of this lecture focuses more on behavioral rather than linguistic cultural impediments to effective communication.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • The Saylor Foundation's “Unit 6 Assessment”  
  • Unit 7: Organization and Outlines  

    In this unit, you will return to the rhetorical situations and cognate strategies that control the development of an oral presentation.  In addition, you will encounter sample speeches illustrating how content is built around a set of organizational principles and structural elements that are placed into the planning framework known as an outline.  This unit also covers transitions that help the audience understand how a speaker’s main ideas are connected.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 7.1 Rhetorical Situation  
  • 7.1.1 Context  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 12.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Context.”

  • 7.1.2 Audience  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 12.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Audience.”

  • 7.1.3 Purpose  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 12.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Purpose.”

  • 7.2 Strategies for Success  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: “Chapter 12: Organization and Outlines: Section 2: Strategies for Success”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: Organization and Outlines: “Section 2: Strategies for Success (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 2: Strategies for Success” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 381 and read pages 381-388, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section gives you an overview of the nine cognate strategies, which are widely acknowledged methods for framing, expressing, and representing a message to an audience.  Attempt the questions at the end of the reading.  For exercises that involve working with classmates, try to work with a family member or friend instead.  This reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 7.2.1 through 7.2.8.

      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: iTunes U: University of Arizona: Department of Communications: Dr. Randolph Accetta's “Presentation Strategies”

      Link: iTunes U: University of Arizona: Department of Communications: Dr. Randolph Accetta's “Presentation Strategies” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down to the “Presentation Strategies” (7/6/10) lecture, select “View in iTunes,” and then listen to this entire lecture (approximately 41 minutes), which covers a variety of strategies for planning and customizing business presentations and will also serve as a preview of many topics that are covered in upcoming subunits.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 7.2.1 Tone  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 12.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Tone.”

  • 7.2.2 Emphasis  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 12.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Emphasis.”

  • 7.2.3 Engagement  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 12.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Engagement.”

  • 7.2.4 Clarity  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 12.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Clarity.”

  • 7.2.5 Conciseness  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 12.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Conciseness.”

  • 7.2.6 Arrangement  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 12.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Arrangement.”

  • 7.2.7 Credibility  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 12.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Credibility.”

  • 7.2.8 Reference  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 12.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Reference.”

  • 7.3 Building a Sample Speech  
  • 7.4 Sample Speech Outlines  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: Organization and Outlines: “Section 4: Sample Speech Outlines”

      Link:  Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: Organization and Outlines: “Section 4: Sample Speech Outlines” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 4: Sample Speech Outlines” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 391 and read pages 391-393, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section justifies the use of outlining as part of the speech development process and provides examples of two types of outlines: one focusing on verbal and visual delivery and another on cognate strategies.  Attempt the questions at the end of the reading.  For exercises that involve working with classmates, try to work with a family member or friend instead.

      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Northeast Mississippi Community College: Belinda Russell’s “Outlining” and Missouri State University: Gary Phillips’: “Outlining”

      Link: iTunes U: Northeast Mississippi Community College: Belinda Russell’s “Outlining (iTunes U) and Missouri State University: Gary Phillips’: “Outlining” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down to the “Outlining” (6/20/08) lecture for Russell and the “Chapter 10” lecture for Phillips.  Select “View in iTunes” to launch the lecture, and then listen to these entire lectures (approximately 5 minutes and 10 minutes, respectively).  Russell covers outlining in a more generalized way, and Phillips touches on the academic aspects of outlining, focusing on those needed to complete an outlining assignment.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

    • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Outlining Assessment”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Outlining Assessment” (PDF)
       
      Instructions: Please complete the linked assessment.  Make sure you read the instructions carefully as this assessment is set up in a rather complex way.  The first section presents information you must use to complete the assessment.  The next section provides you with the outline template that you must follow.  A third section helps you complete the assessment by outlining some of the material for you and giving you pointers on how to proceed further.  This is why you should follow the instructions in the step-by-step manner recommended.  Once you have filled in all of the blanks in the outline template, compare your results with the complete outline found in the fourth section of this assessment.
       
      This assessment should take you approximately 30 minutes to complete.

  • 7.5 Organizing Principles for Your Speech  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: Organization and Outlines: “Section 5: Organizing Principles for Your Speech”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 12: Organization and Outlines: “Section 5: Organizing Principles for Your Speech (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 5: Organizing Principles for Your Speech.”  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 393 and read pages 393-398, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section provides an exceptional list of 17 purpose-specific organizing patterns for business communication speeches.  While the usual rhetorical strategies–based patterns are included (cause/effect, comparison/contrast, etc.)—as well as the logic-based ones (chronological, spatial, etc.)—Business Communication for Success adds very specific step-by-step guidance for ceremonial, wedding, award, introduction, and other types of nonacademic functions).  Attempt the questions at the end of the reading.  For exercises that involve working with classmates, try to work with a family member or friend instead.

      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Missouri State University: Gary Phillips’: “Organizing Your Speech”

      Link: iTunes U: Missouri State University: Gary Phillips’: “Organizing Your Speech (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down to the “Chapter 8” lecture, select “View in iTunes,” and then listen to this entire lecture (approximately 23 minutes), which provides a more standard and extended approach to the basic organizational patterns.  After you view this lecture, take 5-7 minutes to write a paragraph that summarizes what you have learned from this lecture.

      This lecture and paragraph should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 7.6 Transitions  
  • The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 7 Assessment”  
  • Unit 8: Presentations to Inform  

    In this unit, you will encounter the goals and types of informative speeches and learn how to motivate your audience by making your material relevant and useful, finding interesting ways to frame your topic and emphasizing new aspects if the topic is a familiar one.  Understanding your audience, including different learning styles and knowledge bases, must also influence how a speech is developed – functionally as well as ethically.  You will appreciate this as you learn how to apply the five presentation components introduced in Unit 7 to the creation of an informative speech.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 8.1 Functions of the Presentation to Inform  
  • 8.1.1 Share  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 13.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Share.”

  • 8.1.2 Increase Understanding  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 13.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Increase Understanding.”

  • 8.1.3 Change Perceptions  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 13.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Change Perceptions.”

  • 8.1.4 Gain Skills  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 13.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Gain Skills.”

  • 8.1.5 Exposition versus Interpretation  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 13.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Exposition versus Interpretation.”

  • 8.1.6 Point of View  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 13.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Point of View.”

  • 8.2 Types of Presentations to Inform  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: Presentations to Inform: “Section 2: Types of Presentations to Inform”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: Presentations to Inform: “Section 2: Types of Presentations to Inform (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 2: Types of Presentations to Inform” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 409 and read pages 409-413, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section covers how an informative speech may explain, report, describe, or demonstrate how to do something and provides examples of additional types of business-specific informative speaking categories.  Attempt the questions at the end of the reading.  For any of the exercises that require work with a classmate, instead try to find a friend or family member to help you.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 8.2.1 through 8.2.4.

      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: YouTube: Mind Bite’s: “Public Speaking: Types of Informative Speeches”

      Link: You Tube: Mind Bite’s: “Public Speaking: Types of Informative Speeches” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please watch this entire video (approximately 3 minutes) to understand a valuable point: that you can give many different types of speeches on the same subject.  Although few resources make this connection, the rhetorical strategies covered in earlier Business Communication for Success readings and in many of the video lectures are what enable the speaker to discuss a subject by using a variety of approaches that produce entirely different content.  Taking notes and viewing the video should take less than 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 8.2.1 Explanation  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 13.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Explanation.”

  • 8.2.2 Report  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 13.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Report.”

  • 8.2.3 Description  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 13.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Description.”

  • 8.2.4 Demonstration  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 13.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Demonstration.”

  • 8.3 Adapting Your Presentation to Teach  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: “Chapter 13: Presentations to Inform: Section 3: Adapting Your Presentation to Teach”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: Presentations to Inform: “Section 3: Adapting Your Presentation to Teach (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 3: Adapting Your Presentation to Teach” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 413 and read pages 413-423, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section points out how successful speeches encourage active listening and use audience-centered approaches and describes in detail several ways to motivate an audience by making material relevant and useful, finding interesting ways to frame topics and emphasizing new aspects if the topic is a familiar one.  Attempt the exercises at the end of the reading.  For any questions that involve working with a classmate, instead try to work with a family member or friend.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 8.3.1 through 8.3.3.

      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Reading: Andy Arrow's “Information Design for Effective Multimedia Presentations”

      Link: Andy Arrow's “Information Design for Effective Multimedia Presentations” (PDF)

      Instructions: Read this short presentation for advice from a media professional on how relevance, context, and simplicity govern how presentation graphics can be designed and/or edited to encourage rather than discourage audience attention. Reading and taking notes should take you less than 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Laura Davis’ “Adapting Verbally”

      Link: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Laura Davis’ “Adapting Verbally” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down to the “Adapting Verbally” (2/15/10) lecture, select “View in iTunes,” and then listen to this entire lecture (approximately 6 minutes), which reinforces the emphasis on modifying the content and language of a speech to suit specific audiences and contexts, introduced in Business Communication to Success. Take about 5-10 minutes to write a summary of what you have learned from this lecture.

      This lecture and summary should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 8.3.1 Motivating the Listener  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 13.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Motivating the Listener.”

  • 8.3.2 Framing  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 13.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Framing.”

  • 8.3.3 Additional Tips  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 13.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Additional Tips.”

  • 8.4 Diverse Types of Intelligence and Learning Styles  
  • 8.5 Preparing Your Speech to Inform  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: “Chapter 13: Presentations to Inform: Section 5: Preparing Your Speech to Inform”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: Presentations to Inform: “Section 5: Preparing Your Speech to Inform (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 5: Preparing Your Speech to Inform” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 425 and read pages 425-431, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section discusses why, in preparing an informative speech, you must consider the audience’s knowledge, avoid unnecessary jargon, give credit to your sources, and present the information ethically.  This section is particularly useful because it introduces several rarely detailed concepts, including reciprocity, nonjudgmentalism, and mutuality.  Attempt the exercises at the end of the reading.  For any questions that require working with a classmate, instead try to work with a friend or family member.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 8.5.1 through 8.5.6.

      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 45 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Missouri State University: Gary Phillips’ “Beginning and Ending Your Speech”

      Link: iTunes U: Missouri State University: Gary Phillips’ “Beginning and Ending Your Speech” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down to the “Chapter 9” lecture, select “View in iTunes,” and then listen to this entire lecture (approximately 31 minutes), which adds necessary information to this unit’s reading materials because Business Communication for Success does not go into detail about what are frequently considered the most important parts of all speeches: the introduction and the conclusion.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 8.5.1 Start with What You Know  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 13.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Start with What your Know.”

  • 8.5.2 Consider Your Audience’s Prior Knowledge  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 13.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Consider Your Audience’s Prior Knowledge.”

  • 8.5.3 Adapting Jargon and Technical Terms  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 13.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Adapting Jargon and Technical Terms.”

  • 8.5.4 Using Outside Information  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 13.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Using Outside Information.”

  • 8.5.5 Presenting Information Ethically  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 13.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Presenting Information Ethically.”

  • 8.5.6 Sample Informative Presentation  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 13: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 13.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Sample Informative Presentation.”

  • 8.6 Creating an Informative Presentation  
  • The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 8 Assessment”  
  • Unit 9: Presentations to Persuade  

    In this unit, you will understand the nature and challenges of persuasion by becoming more familiar with the principles, functions, and organizational structures associated with persuasive speeches.  By focusing on your audience’s traits and needs, you will learn how to present an argument effectively and ethically as well as how to avoid logical fallacies.  This unit also introduces you to the highly business-relevant “elevator speech”: a 30-second persuasive pitch that exemplifies the time-constrained communication challenges often encountered in business settings.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 9.1 What Is Persuasion?  
  • 9.2 Principles of Persuasion  
  • 9.2.1 Principle of Reciprocity  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 14.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Principle of Reciprocity.”

  • 9.2.2 Principle of Scarcity  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 14.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Principle of Scarcity.”

  • 9.2.3 Principle of Authority  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 14.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Principle of Authority.”

  • 9.2.4 Principle of Commitment and Consistency  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 14.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Principle of Commitment and Consistency.”

  • 9.2.5 Principle of Consensus  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 14.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Principle of Consensus.”

  • 9.2.6 Principle of Liking  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 14.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Principle of Liking.”

  • 9.3 Functions of the Presentation to Persuade  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: Presentations to Persuade: “Section 3: Functions of the Presentation to Persuade”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: Presentations to Persuade: “Section 3: Functions of the Presentation to Persuade (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 3: Functions of the Presentation to Persuade” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 443 and read pages 443-447, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section gives you an overview of what persuasive speeches are designed to do: stimulate thought, convince, call to action, increase consideration, or develop tolerance of alternate perspectives.  This section also provides a useful breakdown of different types of calls to action.  Try to complete the exercises at the end of the reading.  For any questions that prompt you to work or share with a classmate, instead try to work with a friend or family member.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 9.3.1 through 9.3.5.

      This reading and these exercises should take you approximately 45 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Missouri State University: Gary Phillips’ “Persuasive Speaking”

      Link: iTunes U: Missouri State University: Gary Phillips’ “Persuasive Speaking” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down the “Chapter 15 and 16” lecture, select “View in iTunes,” and then listen to this entire lecture (approximately 22 minutes), which supplements Business Communication for Success by providing a comprehensive review of the most important aspects of preparing a persuasive speech.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 9.3.1 Stimulate  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 14.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Stimulate.”

  • 9.3.2 Convince  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 14.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Convince.”

  • 9.3.3 Call to Action  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 14.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Call to Action.”

  • 9.3.4 Increase Consideration  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 14.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Increase Consideration.”

  • 9.3.5 Develop Tolerance of Alternate Perspectives  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 14.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Develop Tolerance of Alternate Perspectives.”

  • 9.4 Meeting the Listener’s Basic Needs  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: Presentations to Persuade: “Section 4: Meeting the Listener’s Basic Needs”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: Presentations to Persuade: “Section 4: Meeting the Listener’s Basic Needs (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 4: Meeting the Listener’s Basic Needs” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 447 and read pages 447-456, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section addresses the question of why we engage in communication by using Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and social penetration theory to explain an audience’s needs.  This latter concept is covered more fully in subunit 13.3, which deals with interpersonal communication.  Attempt the exercises at the end of this reading.  For any questions that prompt you to work or share with a classmate, instead try to work with a friend or family member.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 9.4.1 and 9.4.2.

      This reading and these exercises should take you approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

  • 9.4.1 Maslow’s Hierarchy  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 14.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Maslow’s Hierarchy.”

  • 9.4.2 Social Penetration Theory  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 14.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Social Penetration Theory.”

  • 9.5 Making an Argument  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: Presentations to Persuade: “Section 5: Making an Argument”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: Presentations to Persuade: “Section 5: Making an Argument” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 5: Making an Argument” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 456 and read pages 456-463, or click on the above link to download the textbook now.  This section gives you an overview of classical rhetorical strategies for persuasion and then provides an alternative approach that suits business contexts much better: Stephen Toulmin’s claim-data-warrant rhetorical strategy.  This section also provides a useful acronym for remembering seven additional argumentative strategies (GASCAP/T) and concludes with a discussion about evidence and appeals.  Attempt the exercises at the end of this reading.  For any questions that prompt you to work or share with a classmate, instead try to work with a friend or family member.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 9.5.1 through 9.5.3.

      This reading and these exercises should take you approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: The Saylor Foundation: Critical Thinker Academy's “What Is a Strong Argument?”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation: Critical Thinker Academy’s “What Is a Strong Argument?” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please watch this entire video (approximately 7 minutes) for more information about what makes an argument strong enough to be convincing.  After viewing the video, take 5-7 minutes to write a brief paragraph that summarizes what makes a strong argument.

      This lecture and paragraph should take approximately 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This work has been reposted by the kind permission of the Critical Thinking Academy, and can be viewed in its original form here (YouTube).  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 9.5.1 Argumentation Strategies: GASCAP/T  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 14.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Argumentation Strategies: GASCAP/T.”

  • 9.5.2 Evidence  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 14.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Evidence.”

  • 9.5.3 Appealing to Emotions  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 14.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Appealing to Emotions.”

  • 9.6 Speaking Ethically and Avoiding Fallacies  
  • 9.6.1 Eleven Points for Speaking Ethically  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 14.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Eleven Points for Speaking Ethically.”

  • 9.6.2 Avoiding Fallacies  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 14.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Avoiding Fallacies.”

  • 9.7 Sample Persuasive Speech  
  • 9.7.1 Attention Statement  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 7” reading assigned below subunit 14.7.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Attention Statement.”

  • 9.7.2 Introduction  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 7” reading assigned below subunit 14.7.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Introduction.”

  • 9.7.3 Body  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 7” reading assigned below subunit 14.7.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Body.”

  • 9.7.4 Conclusion  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 7” reading assigned below subunit 14.7.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Conclusion.”

  • 9.7.5 Residual Message  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 14: “Section 7” reading assigned below subunit 14.7.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Residual Message.”

  • 9.8 Elevator Speech  
  • The Saylor Foundation's “Unit 9 Assessment”  
  • Unit 10: Nonverbal Delivery  

    In this unit, you will recognize how nonverbal communication is an influential, contextual process that conveys messages without using words.  By comparing different types of nonverbal techniques, including positioning, gesturing, and visual aids, you will learn how to identify and adopt strategies that are effective with different audiences and in different settings.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 10.1 Principles of Nonverbal Communication  
  • 10.1.1 Nonverbal Communication Is Fluid  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 11.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Nonverbal Communication Is Fluid.”

  • 10.1.2 Nonverbal Communication Is Fast  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 11.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Nonverbal Communication Is Fast.”

  • 10.1.3 Nonverbal Communication Can Add to or Replace Verbal Communication  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 11.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Nonverbal Communication Can Add to or Replace Verbal Communication.”

  • 10.1.4 Nonverbal Communication Is Universal  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 11.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Nonverbal Communication Is Universal.”

  • 10.1.5 Nonverbal Communication Is Confusing and Contextual  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 11.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Nonverbal Communication Is Confusing and Contextual.”

  • 10.1.6 Nonverbal Communication Can Be Intentional or Unintentional  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 11.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Nonverbal Communication Can Be Intentional or Unintentional.”

  • 10.1.7 Nonverbal Communication Communicate Feelings and Attitudes  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 11.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Nonverbal Messages Communicate Feelings and Attitudes.”

  • 10.1.8 We Believe Nonverbal Communication More than Verbal We Believe Nonverbal Communication More than Verbal  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 11.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “We Believe Nonverbal Communication More than Verbal.”

  • 10.1.9 Nonverbal Communication Is Key in the Speaker/Audience Relationship  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 11.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Nonverbal Communication is Key in the Speaker/Audience Relationship.”

  • 10.2 Types of Nonverbal Communication  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: “Chapter 11: Nonverbal Delivery: Section 2: Types of Nonverbal Communication”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: Nonverbal Delivery: “Section 2: Types of Nonverbal Communication (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 2: Types of Nonverbal Communication” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 349 and read pages 349-358.  Alternately, click the link above to read just the assigned material for this resource box.  This section gives you an overview of eight types of nonverbal communication: space, time, physical characteristics, body movements, touch, paralanguage, artifacts, and environment.  Attempt exercises 1, and 3-5 at the end of this reading.  For any questions that prompt you to work or share with a classmate, instead try to work with a friend or family member.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 10.2.1 through 10.2.8.

      This reading and these exercises should take you approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee. 

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Laura Davis’ “Nonverbal Communication”

      Link: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Laura Davis’ “Nonverbal Communication (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down to the “Nonverbal Communication” (2/8/10) lecture, select “View in iTunes,” and then listen to this entire lecture (approximately 10 minutes), which supplements the material in Communication for Success on nonverbal communication.  Taking notes and viewing the lecture should take you less than 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 10.2.1 Space  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 11.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Space.”

  • 10.2.2 Positions on the Stage  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 11.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Positions on the Stage.”

  • 10.2.3 Time  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 11.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Time.”

  • 10.2.4 Gestures  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 11.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Gestures.”

  • 10.2.5 Physical Characteristics  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 11.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Physical Characteristics.”

  • 10.2.6 Facial Gestures  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 11.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Facial Gestures.”

  • 10.2.7 Body Movements  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 11.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Body Movements.”

  • 10.2.8 Touch  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 11.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Touch.”

  • 10.2.9 Paralanguage  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 11.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Paralanguage.”

  • 10.2.10 Artifacts  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 11.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Artifacts.”

  • 10.2.11 Environment  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 11.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Environment.”

  • 10.3 Movement in Your Speech  
  • 10.4 Visual Aids  
  • 10.4.1 Purpose, Emphasis, Support, and Clarity  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 11.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Purpose, Emphasis, Support, and Clarity.”

  • 10.4.2 Methods and Materials  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 11.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Methods and Materials.”

  • 10.4.3 Preparing Visual Aids  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 11.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Preparing Visual Aids.”

  • 10.4.4 Using Visual Aids  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 11.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Using Visual Aids.”

  • 10.4.5 Using PowerPoint as a Visual Aid  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 11.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Using PowerPoint as a Visual Aid.”

  • 10.4.6 Use of Color  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 11.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Use of Color.”

  • 10.4.7 Helpful Hints for Visual Aids  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 11.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Helpful Hints for Visual Aids.”

  • 10.5 Nonverbal Strategies for Success with Your Audience  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: Nonverbal Delivery: “Section 5: Nonverbal Strategies for Success with Your Audience”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: Nonverbal Delivery: “Section 5: Nonverbal Strategies for Success with Your Audience” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 5: Nonverbal Strategies for Success with Your Audience” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 373 and read pages 373-376.  Alternately, click the link above to read just the assigned material for this resource box.  This section describes how to use nonverbal communication to enhance your message, to watch reactions, and to consider enrolling an observer to help you become aware of your nonverbal habits and how your audience receives nonverbal messages.  Attempt some of the exercises at the end of this reading.  For any questions that prompt you to work or share with a classmate, instead try to work with a friend or family member.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 10.5.1 through 10.5.3.

      This reading and these exercises should take you approximately 45 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Laura Davis’ “Adapting Visually/Visual Aids”

      Link: iTunes U: Harrisburg Area Community College, Department of English: Laura Davis’ “Adapting Visually/Visual Aids” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please scroll down to the “Adapting Visually/Visual Aids” (2/9/10) lecture, select “View in iTunes,” and then listen to this entire lecture (approximately 5 minutes), which discusses why it is important to tailor visual aids to suit the context in which they are used.  After you have viewed the lecture, take about 10 minutes to write a summary paragraph in which you describe the important concepts and reasons for using visual aids from the lecture.

      This lecture and paragraph should take about 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 10.5.1 Watch Reactions  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 11.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Watch Reactions.”

  • 10.5.2 Enroll an Observer  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 11.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Enroll an Observer.”

  • 10.5.3 Focus on a Specific Type of Nonverbal Communication  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 11: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 11.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Focus on a Specific Type of Nonverbal Communication.”

  • The Saylor Foundation's “Unit 10 Assessment”  
  • Unit 11: Business Presentations in Action  

    In this unit, you will survey oral presentation occasions commonly encountered in the business world, including the objectives, content, and practices associated with each occasion.  You will discover that each task requires preparation, practice, and a solid understanding of the roles and responsibilities associated with the many activities you may perform as a successful business communicator.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 11.1 Sound Bites and Quotables  
  • 11.2 Telephone/VoIP Communication  
  • 11.3 Meetings  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 15: Business Presentations in Action: “Section 3: Meetings”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 15: Business Presentations in Action: “Section 3: Meetings” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 3: Meetings” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 479 and read pages 479-482.  Alternately, click the link above to read just the assigned material for this resource box.  This section is particularly valuable for its comprehensive list of the elements that characterize a formal business agenda and its extensive list of strategies for ensuring that meetings are productive.  Attempt the exercises at the end of this reading.  For any questions that prompt you to work or share with a classmate, instead try to work with a friend or family member.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 11.3.1 and 11.3.2.

      This reading and these exercises should take you approximately 30 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

    • Lecture: Videojug: “How to Run a Meeting”

      Link: Videojug: “How to Run a Meeting” (Flash)

      Instructions: Please watch this entire video (approximately 4 minutes), which features pointers on how productive meetings are run.  More information on the topic of meetings is also covered in section 15.4.  After you view the video, write a paragraph summarizing the main points you learned from the lecture.

      This lecture and paragraph should take you approximately 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 11.3.1 Meeting Agenda  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 11.3 with the Chapter 15: “Section 3” reading.  Focus on the information in Table 15.2.

  • 11.3.2 Strategies for Effective Meetings  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 11.3 with the Chapter 15: “Section 3” reading.  Focus on the information that appears below the heading “Strategies for Effective Meetings.”

  • 11.4 Celebrations  
  • 11.4.1 Proposing a Toast  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 15: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 15.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Proposing a Toast.”

  • 11.4.2 Roasts  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 15: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 15.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Roasts.”

  • 11.5 Media Interviews  
  • 11.6 Introducing a Speaker  
  • 11.7 Presenting or Accepting an Award  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 15: Business Presentations in Action: “Section 7: Presenting or Accepting an Award”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 15: Business Presentations in Action: “Section 7: Presenting or Accepting an Award” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 7: Presenting or Accepting an Award” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 491 and read pages 491-494.  Alternately, click the link above to read just the assigned material for this resource box.  This section discusses the purpose and processes involved in presenting or accepting awards and maps out five key actions for a presenter to consider: the preparation, staying focused on the honoree, building suspense by using surprise, avoiding drama with a direct approach, and gracefully exiting to put the honoree in the spotlight.  Attempt exercises 1, 3 and 4 at the end of this reading.  For any questions that prompt you to work or share with a classmate, instead try to work with a friend or family member.

      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

    • Lecture: YouTube: Dr. Richard L. Weaver’s “Special Occasion Speeches”

      Link: YouTube: Dr. Richard L. Weaver’s “Special Occasion Speeches (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please watch this entire video (approximately 5 minutes) for a review of several specialized speeches based on frequently encountered business and personal occasions.  Viewing the video and taking notes on the lecture should take you less than 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Activity: The Saylor Foundation: “Giving an Award Activity”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation: “Giving an Award Activity” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please complete the linked activity after reading its instructions and reviewing the additional materials it provides, most of which are based on review Table 15.5 in Business Communication for Success.  Note that there is no answer sheet for this activity because your content will be entirely original.  Instead, proceed to the last section of material in the activity where you will find a table into which you should insert the content you develop.  You will be able to assess the adequacy of your work by judging it against the criteria listed in the adjacent columns of the table.

      This activity should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License (HTML), it is attributed to The Saylor Foundation. 

  • 11.8 Serving as Master of Ceremonies  
  • 11.9 Viral Messages  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 15: Business Presentations in Action: “Section 9: Viral Messages”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 15: Business Presentations in Action: “Section 9: Viral Messages” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 9: Viral Messages” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 496 and read pages 496-500.  Alternately, click the link above to read just the assigned material for this resource box.  This section explains how viral messages (i.e., words, sounds, or images that compel the audience to pass them along) can be used to help a business spread the word about a new venture by appealing to an audience’s emotion, using a trigger to provoke reaction, and being highly relevant to the audience.  Attempt the exercises at the end of this reading.  For any questions that prompt you to work or share with a classmate, instead try to work with a friend or family member.  This reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 11.9.1 through 11.9.3.

      This reading and these exercises should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

    • Lecture: The Saylor Foundation: Massimo Burgio’s “Tools, Viral + Social Media Training”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation: Massimo Burgio’s “Tools, Viral + Social Media Training” (PDF)

      Also Available in:
      Flash

      Instructions: Please review this 45-slide presentation, which expands on the review of viral messages in Business Communication for Success.  This slideshow is divided into three segments, each covering an important aspect of social media marketing: blogging, social networks, and viral marketing.  Note, however, that the slides provide detailed information in an abbreviated format which may occasionally require you to interpret content that is not self-explanatory.  If you encounter unfamiliar terminology or websites on the slides, supplement the content with online searches to understand those references.

      You should take about 1 hour to study this presentation.

      Terms of Use: The presentation above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (HTML).  It is attributed to Massimo Burgio.

  • 11.9.1 Effective Viral Messages  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 15: “Section 9” reading assigned below subunit 15.9.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Proposing a Toast.”

  • 11.9.2 Appeal to Emotion  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 15: “Section 9” reading assigned below subunit 15.9.  Focus on the text that appears after the bold font “appeal to emotion.”

  • 11.9.3 Trigger  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 15: “Section 9” reading assigned below subunit 15.9.  Focus on the text that appears after the bold font “trigger.”

  • The Saylor Foundation's “Unit 11 Assessment”  
  • Unit 12: Negative News and Crisis Communication  

    In this unit, you will discover how in times of confusion or crisis, clear and concise communication takes on an increased level of importance.  You will encounter effective ways to deliver negative messages, including the standard process of presenting a buffer or cushion statement, an explanation, the negative news itself, and then a redirecting statement, and you will appreciate how eliciting negative news through feedback is an important way to avoid problems.  Every organization should have a crisis communication plan, which is why you will become familiar with the elements of a crisis plan, including how to manage press conferences.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 12.1 Delivering a Negative News Message  
  • 12.1.1 Negative Message Checklist  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 17: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 17.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Negative Message Checklist.”

  • 12.1.2 Presenting Negative News in Person  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 17: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 17.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Presenting Negative News in Person.”

  • 12.1.3 Presenting Negative News in Writing  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 17: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 17.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Presenting Negative News in Writing.”

  • 12.2 Eliciting Negative News  
  • 12.3 Crisis Communication Plan  
  • 12.3.1 Key Types of Information during an Emergency  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: “Section 17” reading assigned below sub-subunit 12.3.  Please focus on the bulleted points at the beginning of the reading that follows “Focus on key types of information during an emergency.

  • 12.3.2 Developing Your Crisis Communication Plan  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: “Section 17” reading assigned below subunit 12.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Developing Your Crisis Communication Plan.”

  • 12.4 Press Conferences  
  • The Saylor Foundation's “Unit 12 Assessment”  
  • Unit 13: Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Business Communication  

    In this unit, you will learn about the self-concept and dimensions of the self as they characterize your intrapersonal communication (i.e., how you communicate with yourself).  In addition, you will examine how you communicate with other individuals—your interpersonal communication habits and needs—and how those characteristics can be explained by social penetration theory and predicted by rituals associated with human interaction and conversation.  You will also learn how effective communication can improve how individuals handle disagreements and misunderstandings. 

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 13.1 Intrapersonal Communication  
  • 13.2 Self-Concept and Dimensions of Self  
  • 13.2.1 Self-Concept  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 16: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 16.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Self-Concept.”

  • 13.2.2 Dimensions of Self  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 16: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 16.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Dimensions of Self.”

  • 13.3 Interpersonal Needs  
  • 13.4 Social Penetration Theory  
  • 13.4.1 Principles of Self-Disclosure  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 16: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 16.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Principles of Self-Disclosure.”

  • 13.4.2 Interpersonal Relationships  

    Note: This topic is covered by  Business Communication for Success: Chapter 16: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 16.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Interpersonal Relationships.”

  • 13.5 Rituals of Conversation and Interviews  
  • 13.5.1 Conversation as a Ritual  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 16: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 16.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Conversation as a Ritual.”

  • 13.5.2 Employment Interviewing  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 16: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 16.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Employment Interviewing.”

  • 13.6 Conflict in the Work Environment  
  • 13.6.1 Conflict Management Strategies  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 16: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 16.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Conflict Management Strategies.”

  • 13.6.2 Evaluations and Criticism in the Workplace  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 16: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 16.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Evaluations and Criticism in the Workplace.”

  • The Saylor Foundation's “Unit 13 Assessment”  
  • Unit 14: Intercultural and International Business Communication  

    In this unit, you will be introduced to communication challenges that cross cultural and national boundaries.  Because intercultural and international businesses focus less on the borders that separate people and more on the communication that brings them together, you need to be prepared for when your role as a business communicator crosses cultures, languages, value and legal systems, and borders.  This unit will describe the convergent and divergent cultural characteristics that typify the business world and will review the effects of intercultural communication on management styles and the global marketplace.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 14.1 Intercultural Communication  
  • 14.2 How to Understand Intercultural Communication  
  • 14.3 Common Cultural Characteristics  
  • 14.3.1 Rites of Initiation  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 18.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Rites of Initiation.”

  • 14.3.2 Common History and Traditions  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 18.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Common History and Traditions.”

  • 14.3.3 Common Values and Principles  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 18.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Common Values and Principles.”

  • 14.3.4 Common Purpose and Sense of Mission  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 18.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Common Purpose and Sense of Mission.”

  • 14.3.5 Common Symbols, Boundaries, Status, Language, and Rituals  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 18.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Common Symbols, Boundaries, Status, Language, and Rituals.”

  • 14.4 Divergent Cultural Characteristics  
  • 14.4.1 Individualistic Versus Collectivist Cultures  

    Note: This topic is covered by  Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 18.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Individualistic Versus Collectivist Cultures.”

  • 14.4.2 Explicit –Rule Cultures versus Implicit-Rule Cultures  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 18.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Explicit-Rule Cultures versus Implicit-Rule Cultures.”

  • 14.4.3 Uncertainty-Accepting Cultures versus Uncertainty-Rejecting Cultures  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 18.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Uncertainty-Accepting Cultures versus Uncertainty-Rejecting Cultures.”

  • 14.4.4 Time Orientation  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 18.4. In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Time Orientation.”

  • 14.4.5 Short-Term versus Long-Term Orientation  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 18.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Short-Term versus Long-Term Orientation.”

  • 14.4.6 Masculine versus Feminine Orientation  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 18.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Masculine versus Feminine Orientation.”

  • 14.4.7 Direct versus Indirect  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 18.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Direct versus Indirect.”

  • 14.4.8 Materialism versus Relationships  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 18.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Materialism versus Relationships.”

  • 14.4.9 Low-Power Distance versus High-Power Distance  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 18.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Low-Power Distance versus High-Power Distance.”

  • 14.5 International Communication and the Global Marketplace  
  • 14.5.1 Political Systems  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 18.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Political Systems.”

  • 14.5.2 Legal Systems  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 18.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Legal Systems.”

  • 14.5.3 Economic Systems  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 18.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Economic Systems.”

  • 14.5.4 Ethical Systems  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 18.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Ethical Systems.”

  • 14.5.5 Global Village  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 18.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Global Village.”

  • 14.6 Styles of Management  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: Intercultural and International Business Communication: “Section 6: Styles of Management”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: Intercultural and International Business Communication: “Section 6: Styles of Management” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 6: Styles of Management” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 596 and read pages 596-599.  Alternately, click the link above to read just the assigned material for this resource box.  To explain how people and their relationships to dominant and subordinate roles are a reflection of their culture and cultural viewpoints, this section describes three theories of management – referred to as X, Y, and Z – which are examples of distinct and divergent views on worker motivation, need for supervision, and the possibility of collaboration.  At the end of the reading, try answering the exercise questions.  For questions that prompt you to work or share with a classmate, work with a family member or friend instead.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined for sub-subunits 14.6.1 through 14.6.3.

      This reading and these exercises should take you approximately 30 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

    • Lecture: iTunes U: O. A. Bud Ham Consulting: Bud Ham’s “Styles of Management and Decision Making”

      Link: iTunes U: O. A. Bud Ham Consulting: Bud Ham’s “Styles of Management and Decision Making” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please select “View in iTunes” for the “Styles of Management and Decision Making” lecture, and listen to this entire lecture (approximately 14 minutes) for additional styles of management and how they influence decision making in a company.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 14.6.1 Theory X  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 18.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Theory X.”

  • 14.6.2 Theory Y  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 18.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Theory Y.”

  • 14.6.3 Theory Z  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 6” reading assigned below subunit 18.6.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Theory Z.”

  • 14.7 The International Assignment  
  • 14.7.1 Preparation  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 7” reading assigned below subunit 18.7.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Preparation.”

  • 14.7.2 Acculturation Process  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 7” reading assigned below subunit 18.7.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Acculturation Process.”

  • 14.7.3 Living and Working Abroad  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 18: “Section 7” reading assigned below subunit 18.7.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Living and Working Abroad.”

  • The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 14 Assessment”  
  • Unit 15: Group Communication, Teamwork, and Leadership  

    In this unit, you will learn about the differences between a group and a team and by doing so will gain a better understanding of the life cycles, member roles, and problem-solving characteristics of those units.  In addition, you will be introduced to some of the standard practices associated with business meetings and how leadership styles impact teamwork and group outcomes.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 15.1 What Is a Group?  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: “Chapter 19: Group Communication, Teamwork, and Leadership: Introduction” and “Section 1: What Is a Group?”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: “Chapter 19: Group Communication, Teamwork, and Leadership: Introduction” and “Section 1: What Is a Group?” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read the webpages for the Chapter 19 introduction and “Section 1: What Is a Group?” in their entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 606 and read pages 606-612.  Alternately, click the link above to read just the assigned material for this resource box.  This section makes a distinction between groups and teams, breaks groups down into various types based on their structure and function, and discusses the impact of group size on member participation.  Try to answer the exercise questions at the end of the reading.  For any questions that prompt you to work or share with a classmate, instead work with a family member or friend.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 15.1.1 through 15.1.3.

      This reading and these exercises should take you approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Liberty University’s “Defining a Group”

      Link: iTunes U: Liberty University’s “Defining a Group” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please select “View in iTunes” for the “Defining a Group” ("Chapter 1") lecture, and listen to this entire lecture (approximately 6 minutes), which provides additional details on the nature of groups.  After you view the lecture, write a brief paragraph that paraphrases the definition of a group.

      This lecture and paragraph should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

      Although the overarching concepts presented in the above lecture are equitable and generally agreed upon, the particular examples used may reflect a conservative Christian bias. The opinions expressed in this lecture do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Saylor Foundation or its affiliates.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 15.1.1 Types of Groups in the Workplace  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 19.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Types of Groups in the Workplace.”

  • 15.1.2 Primary Groups and Secondary Groups  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 19.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Primary Group and Secondary Groups.”

  • 15.1.3 What Is a Group?  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19 “Section 1” reading assigned below subunit 19.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “If Two’s Company and Three’s a Crowd, What is a Group?”

  • 15.2 Group Life Cycles and Member Roles  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: Group Communication, Teamwork, and Leadership: “Section 2: Group Life Cycles and Member Roles”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: Group Communication, Teamwork, and Leadership: “Section 2: Group Life Cycles and Member Roles” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 2: Group Life Cycles and Member Roles” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 613 and read pages 613-622.  Alternately, click the link above to read just the assigned material for this resource box.  This section gives you an overview of the predictable patterns that groups tend to follow from their creation to their dissolution.  It also discusses how groups assign roles to members in order to function efficiently and the life cycles those roles also tend to experience.  Attempt to answer the questions at the end of the webpage.  For any questions that prompt you to work or share with a classmate, instead try to work with a friend or family member.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 15.2.1 through 15.2.3.

      This reading and these exercises should take you approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Miami Dade College: Irene Canel-Petersen and Yvette Lujan’s “Small Group Communication” and Liberty University’s “Groups Norms and Roles”

      Link: iTunes U: Miami Dade College: Irene Canel-Petersen and Yvette Lujan’s “Small Group Communication” (iTunes U) and Liberty University’s “Group Norms and Roles” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please select “View in iTunes” for the lectures titled “Small Group Communication” and “Group Norms and Roles” ("Chapter 6"), and listen to these entire lectures (approximately 45 minutes and 8 minutes, respectively) for a deeper understanding of the dynamics of small groups and group roles.

      Although the overarching concepts presented in the above lecture from Liberty Univeristy are equitable and generally agreed upon, the particular examples used may reflect a conservative Christian bias. The opinions expressed in this lecture do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Saylor Foundation or its affiliates.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

  • 15.2.1 Group Life Cycle Patterns  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 19.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Group Life Cycle Patterns.”

  • 15.2.2 Life Cycle Member Roles  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 19.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Life Cycle Member Roles.”

  • 15.2.3 Positive and Negative Member Roles  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 2” reading assigned below subunit 19.2.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Positive and Negative Member Roles.”

  • 15.3 Group Problem Solving  
    • Reading: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: Group Communication, Teamwork, and Leadership: “Section 3: Group Problem Solving”

      Link: Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: Group Communication, Teamwork, and Leadership: “Section 3: Group Problem Solving” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read “Section 3: Group Problem Solving” in its entirety.  If you have already downloaded Business Communication for Success, please turn to page 622 and read pages 622-629.  Alternately, click the link above to read just the assigned material for this resource box.  This section details seven steps that can characterize problem solving in groups.  Of particular note is the table that introduces an example of a cost-benefit analysis for a set of solutions proposed to solve a hypothetical problem.  At the end of the reading, try to answer the exercise questions.  For any question that prompts you to work or share with a classmate, instead try to work with a friend or family member.  Note that this reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 15.3.1 through 15.3.7.

      This reading and these exercises should take you approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

    • Lecture: YouTube: Kate Warren's “Effective Group Decision Making”

      Link: YouTube: Kate Warren's “Effective Group Decision Making” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please watch this entire video (approximately 4 minutes) to learn about four phrases that groups tend to pass through as they arrive at decisions.

      This lecture and paragraph should take less than 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Liberty University’s “Groups Performance”

      Link: iTunes U: Liberty University’s “Groups Performance” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please select “View in iTunes” for the “Groups Performance” ("Chapter 10") lecture, and listen to this entire lecture (approximately 5 minutes), which establishes guidelines for evaluating group performance.  Taking notes and viewing this lecture should take you less than 15 minutes.

      Although the overarching concepts presented in the above lecture are equitable and generally agreed upon, the particular examples used may reflect a conservative Christian bias. The opinions expressed in this lecture do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Saylor Foundation or its affiliates.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 15.3.1 Define the Problem  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 19.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Define the Problem.”

  • 15.3.2 Analyze the Problem  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 19.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Analyze the Problem.”

  • 15.3.3 Establish Criteria  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 19.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Establish Criteria.”

  • 15.3.4 Consider Possible Solutions to the Problem  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 19.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Consider Possible Solutions to the Problem.”

  • 15.3.5 Decide on a Solution  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 19.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Decide on a Solution.”

  • 15.3.6 Implement the Solution  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 19.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Implement the Solution.”

  • 15.3.7 Follow Up on the Solution  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19“Section 3” reading assigned below subunit 19.3.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Follow Up on the Solution.”

  • 15.4 Business and Professional Meetings  
  • 15.4.1 Preparation  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 19.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Preparation.”

  • 15.4.2 Conducting the Meeting  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 19.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Conducting the Meeting.”

  • 15.4.3 Using Technology to Facilitate Meetings  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 19.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Using Technology to Facilitate Meetings.”

  • 15.4.4 Organizational Communication  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 9: “Section 4” reading assigned below subunit 19.4.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Organizational Communication.”

  • 15.5 Teamwork and Leadership  
  • 15.5.1 Teamwork  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 19.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Teamwork.”

  • 15.5.2 Leadership  

    Note: This topic is covered by Business Communication for Success: Chapter 19: “Section 5” reading assigned below subunit 19.5.  In particular, focus on the text below the heading “Leadership.”

  • The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 15 Assessment”  
  • Final Exam  
  • NCCRS Credit Recommended Exam  
    • Optional Final Exam: The Saylor Foundation's "BUS210 Final Exam"

      Link: The Saylor Foundation's "BUS210 Final Exam" (HTML)

      Instructions: The above linked exam has been specially created as part of our National College Credit Recommendation Service (NCCRS) review program.  Successfully passing this exam will make students eligible to receive a transcript with 3 hours of recommended college credit.

      Please note that because this exam has the possibility to be a credit-bearing exam, it must be administered in a proctored environment, and is therefore password protected.  Further information about Saylor's NCCRS program and the options and requirements for proctoring, can be found here.  Please make sure to read this page carefully before attempting this exam.

      If you choose to take this exam, you may want to first take the regular, certificate-bearing BUS210 Final Exam as a practice test, which you can find above.


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