316 courses ePortfolio Forums Blog FAQ

Management Leadership

Purpose of Course  showclose

All managers are leaders.  All leaders are managers.  Which of these statements is true?  Neither.  The words are often confused, even in academic settings, because we think that both leaders and managers are in charge of a specific task or group of people.  However, there are many differences between the two.  One such distinction is that a manager may not be in charge of people at all.  For example, a manager may be in charge of data, including its acquisition, analysis, and dissemination.  Or consider the fact that a leader may have no formal power; many of history’s greatest leaders only had power “earned” from their peers instead of power granted by another individual or group.  Think of our country’s founding fathers, like Thomas Jefferson, who went against the British government to draft the Declaration of Independence—the situation created the “team,” and from that the recognized leaders emerged.  All of these distinctions will be explored in this course.

Not only will this course distinguish between managers and leaders, but it will provide you with some of the resources to be both a competent manager and a good leader.  Whether you want to run a doctor’s office or a company with thousands of employees, management and leadership skills are the keys that open those doors.  Many believe that the highest positions are given to those that know the most about the business, but in reality those positions are reserved for leaders whose leadership skills transcend business acumen.  These skills are difficult to teach in any setting, so it is important to study them carefully and look for real world situations in which to practice them.

The structure of this course focuses mostly on leadership, because a good portion of management skills are reserved for technical knowledge in a position.  This course will begin with an introduction that will help further the distinction between leadership and management, and then you will be introduced to major theories and models of leadership and of leadership development from a variety of perspectives.  Next, you will be introduced to the process of decision-making in a variety of leadership settings.  You will then study the processes of leading independently, or without direct authority.  The final unit will focus on managing groups and teams.  You may not be a leader after concluding this course, but you certainly will have a better understanding of the qualities of leadership.  Perhaps you will discover there is a leader right at your fingertips.

Since April 29th, 2013, students have been able experience portions of this course through the interactive problem based learning pedagogy from Sunstone Business School MOOCSunstone Business School

Saylor.org has partnered with Sunstone Business School to have select content pieces and sections of this courses delivered in an instructor led, problem based short course, titled Being an Effective New Leader.  Versions of this MOOC will last for approximately 2 weeks.

Course Information  showclose

Welcome to BUS401.  Below, please find some general information on the course and its requirements.
 
Course Designers: Phillip Whitley and Spyridon Patton
 
Primary Resources: This course is comprised of a range of different onlinematerials, as the subject is extensive and lends itself to both written and visual formats.  While many different materials are used, the following is a list of primary sources:

  • Time magazine’s  “The Time 100: Leaders and Revolutionaries”
  • Legacee.com Murray Johannsen’s Leadership and Management series
  • Mindtools.com series on Leadership Skills
  • Free Management Library’s articles on Leadership by Carter McNamara
  • Zainbooks’ Lesson in Leadership and Team Management

Requirements for Completion: You are expected to complete the readings and video assignments for each unit.  At the end of each unit, there is a set of reading questions which will enable you to properly frame the assigned material within the overall objectives for the unit and for the course.  At the end of the final unit, there is a Final Exam that must be completed.  Please note that you will only receive an official grade on your Final Exam.  In order to “pass” this course, you will need to earn a 70% or higher on the Final Exam.  Your score on the exam will be tabulated as soon as you complete it.  If you do not pass the exam, you may take it again.
 
Time Commitment: This course should take you approximately 96.5hours to complete.  Each unit includes a “time advisory” that lists the amount of time you are expected to spend on each subunit.  These should help you plan your time accordingly.  It may be useful to take a look at these time advisories and to determine how much time you have over the next few weeks to complete each unit, and then to set goals for yourself.  For example, Unit 1 should take you 12.75 hours.  Perhaps you can sit down with your calendar and decide to complete subunit 1.1 (a total of 3 hours) on Monday night; sub-subunits1.2.1 through 1.2.3(a total of 4.5hours) on Tuesday night; etc.
 
Tips/Suggestions: Remember that the time advisories are simply estimates.  You should dedicate time to reviewing resources and studying the content of the materials presented in this course.  It will be helpful to take comprehensive notes on the resources in this course.  These notes will serve as a useful study guide as you prepare for your Final Exam. 



 
A version of this course is also available in iTunes U.
Preview the course in your browser or view our entire suite of iTunes U courses.  

Learning Outcomes  showclose

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  • Distinguish the concept of leadership from the concept of management.
  • Compare and contrast the major theories of leadership.
  • Analyze the decision-making process and change management.
  • Assess the skills necessary to exert power and influence in a non-authoritative leadership role.
  • Evaluate the qualities necessary to effectively manage or lead in a team/group environment.

Course Requirements  showclose

In order to take this course, you must:

√    Have access to a computer

√    Have continuous broadband internet access

√    Have the ability/permission to install plug-ins or software (e.g. Adobe Reader or Flash)

√    Have the ability to download and save files and documents to a computer

√    Have the ability to open Microsoft files and documents (.doc, .ppt, .xls, etc.)

√    Have competency in the English language

√    Have completed BUS208 and BUS209 successfully.

Unit Outline show close


Expand All Resources Collapse All Resources
  • Unit 1: Introduction  

    What are management and leadership?  What is the purpose of studying how to lead a team?  Aren’t all leaders born and not made?  If that is the truth, then millions of people are wasting their time trying to improve their leadership skills.  Fortunately, trying to become a better leader is not a waste of time.  While it is true that some leaders are born, most are made by studying what makes an effective leader.

    In this introductory unit, you will explore the four pillars of good management: management, leadership, groups, and teams.  Management and leadership are often used interchangeably; the same applies for groups and teams.  Management is about allocating resources; leadership is about empowering people.  A group is a collection of individuals with a similar interest.  Teams have a similar goal, but teams work together.  A good leader will help a group and become a team.

    To prepare you for this course, this unit concludes with a look at some great leaders in history.  These four individuals are selected for their broad experiences and abilities to manage groups and teams.  The spectrum goes from sports team management to inspiring political movements, and from brilliant corporate management to excellence in military and national leadership. 

    Unit 1 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 1 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 1.1 Definitions  
  • 1.1.1 Management  
  • 1.1.2 Leadership vs. Management  
  • 1.1.3 Leadership Styles  
  • 1.1.4 Teams  

    Note: This subunit is covered by the Rapid Intellect article assigned beneath subunit 1.1.3.

  • 1.2 Great Leaders  

    Note: There are thousands of leaders that have graced the pages of history, and there are many more who may have crossed your own path in life.  Certainly no two leaders are exactly alike.  The four leaders discussed below are all well known, but they are four very different people that lived in different times and circumstances.  Each has approached their role as a leader based on their personality and developed a style of leadership that suited their situation.  Each has been effective in his own way.  The examples below, while well-known and often discussed in the business world, are not the only successful leaders; certainly there are others that will come to mind as you read the leadership bios below.  As you learn about these famous leaders, consider which of Lewin’s leadership styles (see sub-subunit 1.1.2) each leader exemplifies.  You may also want to keep a running journal of their similarities as well as their differences, and you will have an opportunity to review your findings in the guided reading questions provided at the end of this unit.

  • 1.2.1 Vince Lombardi  
  • 1.2.2 Steve Jobs  
    • Reading: Leadership with You’s “Steve Jobs: Leadership Case Study”

      Link: Leadership with You’s “Steve Jobs: Leadership Case Study” (HTML and YouTube)
       
      Instructions: Read the entire article linked above.  You may also choose to click the hyperlinks within the text, such as the video link of Steve Jobs’ commencement speech at Stanford University.  Steve Jobs was the co-founder and CEO of Apple.  This article explores Steve Jobs’ attitudes toward his company, Apple, as well as his perspectives on leadership.  Remember that he started this company from scratch and that it is now the second largest corporation in the world behind Exxon/Mobil.
       
      Studying this resource and exploring the hyperlinks should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.2.3 Nelson Mandela  
  • 1.2.4 Teddy Roosevelt  
    • Reading: Time’s “The Time 100: Leaders and Revolutionaries”: Edmund Morris’s “Teddy Roosevelt”

      Link: Time’s “The Time 100: Leaders and Revolutionaries”: Edmund Morris’s “Teddy Roosevelt” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Read the entire article on the webpage linked here.  Click the “Next” button at the end of the article to navigate through the webpages.   This article describes the leadership qualities of Teddy Roosevelt, the 26th President of the United States.
       
      Studying this reading should take approximately 2 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.2.5 Jack Welch  
    • Web Media: MIT World’s “A Conversation with Jack Welch”

      Link: MIT World’s “A Conversation with Jack Welch” (Flash)
       
      Also available via: iTunes
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and watch this entire video in which former General Electric CEO, Jack Welch, discusses his views on leadership with an audience at the MIT Sloan School of Management.  Note Welch’s emphasis on the importance of performance and accountability.  Before his retirement from GE in 2001, Business Week noted that Welch had created more value for shareholders than any other CEO in history.
       
      Viewing this video and pausing to take notes should take approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Unit 1 Assessment  
  • Unit 2: Leadership Theory  

    People have studied leadership since ancient times, and theories of leadership have been around for centuries (Plato, Sun Tzu, Machiavelli, etc.); however, it wasn’t until the 20th century that the modern theories began to take shape.  Today, researchers study leadership the same way that they study other aspects of psychology: they seek to get a better understanding of people’s behavior and motivation. 

    The problem with some of these theories is that they tend to contradict instead of complement each other.  They seek to identify one set of rules or behaviors that turns someone into a leader.  The reality is likely a combination of all the theories and some ideas that have yet to be defined.  It is best to study these theories with an open mind and understand that they each have their own merits.  Remember that emphasis should not be placed on any one theory.

    Unit 2 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 2 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 2.1 Trait Theory  

    Note: Trait theory concerning management is the belief that leaders are born with certain characteristics (or traits) that make them successful; in other words, being a leader is innate or based on the qualities of one’s personality.  This theory assumes that a person who is born with certain traits will ultimately be a great leader.

  • 2.1.1 What Is Trait Theory?  
  • 2.1.2 Common Traits in Leaders  
    • Reading: U.S. Small Business Administration’s “Lead”

      Link: U.S. Small Business Administration’s “Lead” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and review the information on this webpage.  This is a brief list of nine personality traits identified by leadership research pioneer Raymond Cattell in 1954, along with several traits uncovered since then.  Note this listing is based on conventional personality qualities.

      Studying this reading should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: Legacee: Murray Johansen’s “Nine Characteristics of Successful Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders”

      Link: Legacee: Murray Johansen’s “Nine Characteristics of Successful Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, read the nine characteristics of successful business leaders, and view the video that appears immediately after the “Wrap-up” section.  Preceded by a picture of Steve Jobs and Bill Gates together, this presentation briefly describes nine traits applied directly to business leadership based upon the pioneering work of David McClelland.
       
      Studying this reading, viewing this video, and note-taking should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.2 Behavioral  
  • 2.2.1 “Two” Factor Models  
  • 2.2.1.1 University of Iowa  
    • Reading: New Mexico State University: David Boje’s “The Isles Leadership: The Voyage of the Behaviorists”

      Link: New Mexico State University: David Boje’s “The Isles Leadership: The Voyage of the Behaviorists” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire webpage.  Professor Boje has provided an entertaining summary of all behavioral theories of leadership, but this presentation includes a useful summary of the “University” models as well.  He begins with a fable by way of introduction then reviews each theory.  The section marked Lewin, et al. -1938 is the Iowa model; Fleishman et al. 1945 is the Ohio State model, and Michigan University – Katz, et al. is self-explanatory.  You will find this piece useful to review other behavioral models if you wish.  Professor Boje is associated with New Mexico State University.  This reading covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 2.2.1.1-2.2.1.3.
       
      Studying this reading should take approximately 4 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.2.1.2 University of Michigan  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below sub-subunit 2.2.1.1.  In particular, focus on the section under the “Michigan University – Katz et al.” heading.

  • 2.2.1.3 Ohio State University  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below sub-subunit 2.2.1.1.  In particular, focus on the section under “Fleishman et al. 1945” heading.

  • 2.2.2 Leadership Grid  
  • 2.3 Situational Leadership  
  • 2.3.1 Leadership Styles  
  • 2.3.2 Maturity Levels of Agents: Hersey-Blanchard  
    • Reading: Military Review: George Yeakley’s “Situational Leadership”

      Link: Military Review: George Yeakley’s “Situational Leadership” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, scroll down to the section titled “Situational Leadership,” and read this section as well as the section that follows.  This presentation was prepared for an ROTC leadership training course.  It reviews the major tenets of the situational theory of leadership within the military leadership context
       
      Studying this reading should take approximately 2 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above. The material above has been posted with permission of The Air University. It can be viewed in its original form here. 

  • 2.4 Skill Based: Uses and Limitations  
  • 2.5 Visionary  
  • 2.5.1 Visionary Characteristics and Models  
    • Reading: Create the Future: Frank Martinelli’s “Encouraging Visionary Board Leadership”

      Link: Create the Future: Frank Martinelli’s “Encouraging Visionary Board Leadership” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the information on this webpage.  This text is geared toward an audience of board members of nonprofit organizations, which certainly can utilize a visionary leadership style.  Martinelli presents the steps needed to develop a visionary style of leadership as well as barriers which could impinge on that development.

      Studying this reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.5.2 Behavioral Components  
  • 2.6 Transformational Leadership  
  • Unit 2 Assessment  
  • Unit 3: Change Management and Decision-Making  

    The most difficult task for a manager is implementing changes without disrupting the whole business.  Changes to the normal business operation will have supporters and protestors.  It is important for a manager to understand the point of views from both sides.  Sometimes the changes are minor, such as a new benefits plan.  Other times major changes must be made, such as moving the operations across the country and laying off employees.  The only certainty with change is that you cannot please everyone, but a good manager will anticipate reactions and focus on effective communication.

    Both major and minor changes are often the result of a decision-making process.  There are many different ways to approach a decision, and each method has an appropriate time and place.  Decisions can be based on dictatorial edicts, on a leader’s decision derived from consultation with subordinates, or on a more collective process where everyone can develop and agree on the final outcome.  These methods will be presented in this unit.  In addition, one must also address the real probability that decisions, regardless of the process by which they are derived, will be clouded by any of a number of biases.  We present the most critical of those biases, including anchoring, “groupthink” and selective perception in this unit as well.

    Unit 3 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 3 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 3.1 Change Management  
  • 3.1.1 Types of Change  
    • Reading: Free Management Library: Carter McNamara’s “Organizational Change and Development”

      Link: Free Management Library: Carter McNamara’s “Organizational Change and Development” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: For this sub-subunit, you will read two sections of McNamara’s article.  First, read the “Introduction,” which you will find in the section titled “Foundations for Managing Change in Organizations.”  The Introduction will give you an overview of the need for change management.  Second, read “Specific Types of Organizational Change,” which you will find in the section titled “Overview of Change Management.”  Click on each of the four links in sequence to read the four pages covering differing perspectives on organizational change: “Types of Organizational Change,” “The Three Shades of Change,” “Coping with Type I Change,” and “Managing Type II Change.”  The first link will download a PDF file adapted from “The Field Guide to Consulting and Organizational Development.”  The remaining links will open as HTML pages.
       
      Studying this reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.1.2 Lewin’s Three-Step Model of Change  

    Note: The social scientist, Kurt Lewin, believed that change functions as a balance of forces that either drives employees toward a goal (driving force) or pulls employees in opposite directions (restraining force).  He understood that change happens as a process, and he developed a three-step model of change in order to successfully transition through planned change.  The first stage, considered “unfreeze” is to prepare a business or organization for the change, the second stage is to relieve any uncertainty after the change is implemented, and the last stage is “refreeze” or maintaining that the changes are being used appropriately.

  • 3.1.3 Communicating Change  
    • Web Media: YouTube: IABC/Chicago’s “Communicating Change”

      Link: YouTube: IABC/Chicago’s “Communicating Change” (YouTube)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view this entire video.  IABC is the international Association of Business communications.  This video summarizes a panel presentation at a conference in Chicago on communicating change.  The participants discuss change communication projects within their organization.  Turn up the volume a little.  You may have to play it twice as these communicators suffer from poor recording devices.
       
      Viewing this video (several times if needed) and pausing to take notes should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.2 Decision Making  
  • 3.2.1 Individual Decisions  
    • Reading: Mind Tools’ “The Vroom-Yetton-Lago Decision Model”

      Link: Mind Tools’ “The Vroom-Yetton-Lago Decision Model” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and study the entire webpage.  Although brief, this presentation summarizes two individual decision-making styles – autocratic and consultative (each with two variants) – along with the team or collaborative style which can be used for the next topic.  The highlight is the extensive tree diagram.  By following this tree, you will be able to develop an extensive taxonomy to enable you to distinguish between the three styles. (The article identifies each style with a code.  Use it to help you follow along.)
       
      Studying this resource should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.2.2 Team Decisions  
  • 3.2.3 Optimal (Rational) Decisions  
    • Reading: U.S. Army War College: Lt.Col. Stephen A. Shambach’s “Strategic Decision-making in the Information Age”

      Link: U.S. Army War College: Lt.Col. Stephen A. Shambach’s “Strategic Decision-making in the Information Age” (HTML) (PPT)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and you will go to the Table of Contents.  Under “First Day Presentations,” select the link to “A. Rational Decision-Making Model,” and read this entire section.  This will describe the first model presented which the rational or optimal decision making model.  There is a link embedded to an Appendix B which will take you to a PowerPoint presentation of the model referred to in the presentation.  You may wish to review this for one example of this type of decision-making model.  This material is taken from a workshop held at the War College in 1996, comparing various leadership decision models and their relevancy to military decision-making.
       
      Studying this section of the reading should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above. The material above has been posted with permission of The Air University. It can be viewed in its original form here.

  • 3.2.4 Satisficing  

    Note: Satisficing is a strategy, where a decision is settled upon as being “good enough” instead of working on an optimal solution.  A team may do this to evade incurring additional costs or using extra resources that may come with deciding on an ideal solution.

  • 3.2.5 Biases  

    Note: Biases are a regular part of everyday life.  The best way to avoid a bias when making a decision is to pretend you are seeing all available information for the first time.  History’s successes and failures may help when making decisions, but they run the risk of influencing decisions when the situation is not the same.

  • 3.2.5.1 Anchoring  
  • 3.2.5.2 Groupthink  

    Note: Remember that groupthink involves a group nonchalantly coming to a consensus without discussing or considering fully the main issue at hand.  This may be because one person in the group has more influence over the others, or because the group is not motivated to resolve the issue. 

    • Reading: Psychologists for Social Responsibility’s “What Is Groupthink?”

      Link: Psychologists for Social Responsibility’s “What Is Groupthink?” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read this entire webpage.  This is a scholarly presentation on the concept of groupthink and includes an annotated bibliography that you may wish to use to pursue on your own.  The works of Byron Janis are the originals. 
       
      Studying this reading should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.2.5.3 Selective Perception  
    • Reading: Illinois State University’s “POS 101: Selective Perception”

      Link: Illinois State University’s “POS 101: Selective Perception” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and review this brief presentation on the topic of selective perception.  Selective perception is best summarized by the phrase “we hear what we want to hear” and base decisions in that way.
       
      Studying this reading should take less than 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Unit 3 Assessment  
  • Unit 4: Leading Without Formal Authority  

    While many students of this course will go on to manage teams, organizations, and companies, everyone will have opportunities to lead without being granted any actual authority (called “legitimate power”).  To leverage these opportunities, you must know what types of power exist and when to use them.  For example, having expert power allows someone to step-up, because they have the most knowledge about a specific subject.

    Leading without authority goes beyond power; the ability to influence without manipulation, emotional intelligence, and interpersonal skills are all important aspects of gaining power and leadership without having direct authority over a group or team.  After studying these topics, you will be able to recognize when a leader takes over a situation and to determine who may be the best leader for a given situation. 

    Unit 4 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 4 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 4.1 Power  
  • 4.1.1 Sources  
    • Reading: CLI: Terry Stimson’s “Sources of Power”

      Link: CLI: Terry Stimson’s “Sources of Power” (HTML)
       
      Instruction: Please read the entire article by Terry Stimson.  Consider answering the questions at the end of the reading for your own benefit.
       
      Reading and answering the questions should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: LearnManagement2.com’s “Leadership Power”

      Link: LearnManagement2.com’s “Leadership Power” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the information on this webpage.  Also, click on the PowerPoint link for a useful summary of the sources of power.
       
      Studying this resource should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.1.2 Forms of Exerting Leadership  
  • 4.1.2.1 Dominance  
  • 4.1.2.2 Conflict Prevention  
  • 4.1.2.3 Empowerment  
  • 4.2 Influence  
  • 4.2.1 Compliance  
    • Web Media: YouTube: Dr. Robert Cialdini’s “Dr. Robert Cialdini –Expert in the Fields of Persuasion, Compliance, and Negotiation”

      Link: YouTube: Dr. Robert Cialdini’s “Dr. Robert Cialdini - Expert in the Fields of Persuasion, Compliance, and Negotiation” (YouTube)
       
      Instructions: This 9-minute video is really a visual promotion for Dr. Cialdini, who is Professor Emeritus of Business at Arizona State University and internationally recognized in the field of influence.  This video is a compendium of clips for lectures and appearances on MSNBC and CNBC, among others.  It is useful for the entire section, but pay attention to the material on compliance which is interspersed through this presentation.
       
      Viewing this video and pausing to take notes should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

      The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

      Submit Materials

  • 4.2.2 Identification (with the Leader and Organization)  
  • 4.2.3 Internalization (or “Buying into the Leader”)  
    • Reading: The University of Rhode Island Schmidt Labor Research Center: Richard W. Scholl’s “Leadership Overview”

      Link: The University of Rhode Island, Schmidt Labor Research Center: Richard W. Scholl’s “Leadership Overview” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read the first three sections of this prelude to a course on leadership offered at the university.  The first section – “What Is Leadership?” – is a good review for Unit 1.  The next section – “What Is Leadership Effectiveness and How Is It Assessed?” – includes material on the role of influence as a measure of leadership effectiveness.  The third section on leadership styles is in part a review of Unit 2 and contains the material about the importance of internalization in leadership.
       
      Studying this reading should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.2.4 Minority Influence  
  • 4.3 Emotional Intelligence (EI)  

    Note: Emotional Intelligence is not the same as understanding or empathy.  Rather, it is the ability to identify, understand, and manage emotions of oneself and if applicable, the emotions of a group.

  • 4.3.1 Understanding EI : The “New Hampshire Perspective”  
    • Reading: University of New Hampshire’s “What Is Emotional Intelligence?”

      Link: University of New Hampshire’s “What Is Emotional Intelligence?” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, read the first webpage, and click on the links to all six parts of the reading.  This is six part presentation from the University of New Hampshire.  Two of the school’s professors, John Meyer and Peter Salovey, claim credit for developing this concept.  By clicking on every section, you will receive a comprehensive presentation on the subject.
       
      Studying this reading should take approximately 3 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.3.2 Emotional Intelligence Models  
  • 4.3.3 Emotional Intelligence and Leadership  
  • 4.4 Interpersonal Skills  
  • 4.4.1 Communication  
    • Reading: U.S. Air Force: Dr. John A. Kline’s “Communication and Leadership”

      Link: U.S. Air Force: Dr. John A. Kline’s “Communication and Leadership” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire text.  This article, prepared for the Air Force course in leadership, focuses on the role of communication in leadership, including pitfalls to avoid and ways to improve communications with subordinates.
       
      Studying this reading should take approximately 2 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above. The material above has been posted with permission of The Air University. It can be viewed in its original form here.

  • 4.4.2 Assertiveness  
    • Reading: Webster University: Walker School of Business and Technology’s “Assertive Leadership”

      Link: Webster University: Walker School of Business and Technology’s “Assertive Leadership” (HTML)

      Instructions: The blog page you first view is really a prelude for the main article, which can be found by clicking on the link after “Learn More” at the end of the main webpage.  Entitled “Assertiveness: Why It Matters and How It Will Help You Lead” (2010), the article, sponsored by Tampa based Gary L. Wood and Associates, will lead you through the relationship between assertiveness and leadership.  You will need Adobe Reader to view the article.
       
      Studying this resource should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.4.3 Conflict Resolution  
    • Reading: University of Missouri – St. Louis: Amy Ohlendorf’s “Conflict Resolution in Project Management”

      Link: University of Missouri – St. Louis: Amy Ohlendorf’s “Conflict Resolution in Project Management” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire text.  The context of the article is conflict management in IT project teams, but the bulk of the article is devoted to the nature of conflict and the generic presentation of conflict resolution strategies.  Ms. Ohlendorf is an Information Systems specialist at the University of Missouri, St. Louis.  There is a notated reference list at the end that you may find useful.
       
      Studying this resource should take approximately 2 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Unit 4 Assessment  
  • Unit 5: Managing Groups and Teams  

    Whether your power base is legitimate or otherwise, you may find yourself potentially in a leadership position within a group or team.  But what is the difference between a group and a team?  This was touched on in the first unit, but further distinction is needed here.  Groups are often formed organically.  Think about a group of car enthusiasts: they come together because of a similar interest.  There may not be an underlying goal other than to share ideas and discuss topics of mutual interest.  Teams are formed more strategically.  For example, think about a professional sports team; management carefully selects and trains players, and together they work toward the common goal of winning games. 

    Teams should function in the way a group does: with a more relaxed atmosphere, which will allow each contributor to feel comfortable in his or her role.  Maintaining this atmosphere can be difficult, because teams sometimes work in very stressful environments.  This is why building a good team with great dynamics is so important and so challenging.  A team that functions well together will be more productive than a team that does not have a good dynamic.  Thus, this unit will enable you to explore the world of teams and groups.  You will learn about the internal processes that underlie team/group formation and maintenance as well as the role of leadership in these types of settings.  The unit opens with a discussion of diversity.  While the value of diversity in an organization is not restricted to team processes, scholars and business practitioners both agree that team performance is improved by a diverse membership.

    As stated throughout, this course will not make you a good leader or member of a team, but it can give you the tools that will help you recognize what makes a team effective and identify the players that serve best as leaders.

    Unit 5 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 5 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 5.1 Managing Diversity  
  • 5.1.1 The Value of Diversity  
  • 5.1.2 Inclusion and Diversity  
  • 5.1.3 Conflict  
  • 5.1.4 Motivation  
  • 5.1.5 Inclusion and Diversity  
    • Web Media: YouTube: Tony Anderson’s “Tony Anderson – The Demographics of Global Business”

      Link: YouTube: Tony Anderson’s “Tony Anderson – The Demographics of Global Business” (YouTube)
                 
      Instructions: The link will take you to the first of three segments of a presentation made by Tony Anderson, Midwest Area Managing Partner of Ernst and Young.  This presentation was given to the 2009 Annual Meeting of Chicago United an organization devoted to promoting diversity and inclusion in all organizations.  When you are done viewing this segment click on the right the link marked “The Business Case for Diversity…”, which is segment 2.  Then click on the video marked “ Motivating, Developing, Coaching…” to complete the presentation.  The entire set is about 20 minutes in length.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 5.2 Internal Group Processes  
  • 5.2.1 Cohesion  
    • Reading: Lewis-Clark State College’s “Group Cohesion”

      Link: Lewis-Clark State College’s “Group Cohesion” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and review the information on this webpage.  This is a set of notes from a course provided for athletic team leaders on the subject.  Pay close attention to Carron’s model, which is the dominant model of group cohesion.  Try the critical thinking question provided at the bottom of the page.
       
      Studying these notes and attempting the critical thinking question should take approximately 45 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 5.2.2 Communication  
    • Reading: Montana State University Extension Service: Dave Sharpe’s “Group Communication”

      Link: Montana State University Extension Service: Dave Sharpe’s “Group Communication” (HTML)
        
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read this entire article.  This working paper is part of the University’s Extension (outreach) program in community development.  It includes the factors influencing communication, the logistics of group communication, the essentials of verbal and nonverbal communication, and the responsibilities of both leaders and members in maintaining good communication channels.
       
      Studying this reading should take approximately 2 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 5.2.3 Conflict  
  • 5.2.4 Motivation  
    • Reading: Dr. Rasha Salama’s “Motivation towards Teamwork”

      Link: Dr. Rasha Salama’s “Motivation towards Teamwork” (PPT)
       
      Instructions: Click on the above link, then select “36041” to download the PowerPoint presentation file to your computer.  This is a 28 slide presentation on the subject of team motivation.  Dr. Salama, of the Faculty of Medicine of Suez Canal University in Egypt, presented this PowerPoint to the University Of Pittsburgh Graduate School Of Public Health.  While oriented to public health professionals the presentation presents the key elements required here.  There is a critical thinking question in Slide 28 you may wish to review.
       
      Studying this resource and addressing the critical thinking question should take approximately 2 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 5.3 Building and Managing Teams  
  • 5.3.1 Groups  
    • Reading: Rapid Intellect: Lawrence E. Zeff and Mary A. Higby’s “Teaching More than You Know”

      Link: Rapid Intellect: Lawrence E. Zeff and Mary A. Higby’s “Teaching More than You Know” (HTML)
       
      Instruction: Please click on the link above, and read the entire webpage, which provides a useful distinction between the generic concept of groups and its subunit teams.  The application presented here is geared towards classroom management and organization, but it is framed by the general context of illuminating the difference between the two concepts.  You will find additional references at the end that you may wish to explore on your own as well.  This reading covers the topics outlined for sub-subunits 5.2.1 and 5.2.2.
       
      Studying this reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 5.3.2 Teams  

    Note: This topic is covered by the Rapid Intellect article assigned beneath sub-subunit 5.2.1.

  • 5.3.3 Group Development  
  • 5.3.4 Dynamics  
  • 5.3.5 Team Building  
  • 5.3.6 Virtual Teams  
  • 5.4 Team Leadership  
  • 5.4.1 Credibility  
  • 5.4.2 Balancing Management and Leadership  
    • Reading: Business Leadership Review: Richard Bolden, Jonathan Gosling, and John Burgoyne’s “High Performance Leadership”

      Link: Business Leadership Review: Richard Bolden, Jonathan Gosling, and John Burgoyne’s “High Performance Leadership” (PDF)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read this entire text.  This article presents the outcomes of a three-year workshop, which sought to assess the relationship between leadership development and performance management.  There is also some discussion on diversity (see subunit 5.4).  The authors are scholars at the universities of Exeter and Lancaster in Great Britain.
       
      Studying this reading should take approximately 4 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 5.4.3 Transitional Leadership  
    • Reading: American Society for Training and Development: Joseph T. Christy’s “Successful Leadership Transition”

      Link: American Society for Training and Development: Joseph T. Christy’s “Successful Leadership Transition” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire article.  While Joseph Christy’s background is in juvenile justice, the article here presents a fairly comprehensive and generalized overview on the subject.  A team framework with a procedure for dealing with leadership transitions already in place will be able to minimize the disruption caused by leadership change, leading to a smooth period of transition.
       
      Studying this reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Unit 5 Assessment  
  • Final Exam  

« Previous Unit Next Unit » Back to Top