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Introduction to Mechanics

Purpose of Course  showclose

Physics 101 is the first course in the Introduction to Physics sequence. In general, the quest of physics is to develop descriptions of the natural world that correspond  closely to actual observations.  Given this definition, the story behind everything in the universe is  one of physics.  In practice,  the field of physics is more often limited to the discovery and refinement of the basic laws that underlie the behavior of matter and energy.  While biology is founded upon physics, in practice, the study of biology generally assumes that the present understanding of physical laws is accurate.  Chemistry is more closely dependent on physics and   assumes that physical laws provide accurate predictions.  Engineering, for the most part, is applied physics. In this course, we will study physics from the ground up, learning the basic principles of physical laws, their application to the behavior of objects, and the use of the scientific method in driving advances in this knowledge.  This first course of the three-course series (the subsequent courses in the series are Introduction to Electromagnetism and Introduction to Modern Physics) will cover the area of physics known as classical mechanics. Classical mechanics is the study of motion based on the physics of Galileo Galilei and Isaac Newton.

While mathematics is the language of physics, you will only need to be familiar with high school level algebra, geometry, and trigonometry.  The small amount of additional math and calculus that we need will be developed during the course.

Course Information  showclose

Welcome to PHYS101.  General information on this course and its requirements can be found below.

Primary Resources: This course is comprised of a range of different free online materials.  However, the course makes primary use of the following resources:
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s Physics I: Classical Mechanics Video Lectures
  • The textbook to accompany this course is OpenStax College’s College Physics.You may find it helpful to download the PDF version and save  the PDF file as it will be used throughout the entire course. Problems will be assigned from this text. These are extremely important as they will be similar to those on the final exams. Solutions to the problem sets  are available, but it is important that you make every effort to solve the problems before looking at the solutions. Getting the answers is not what is important.  It is more important that you understand how to go about finding the answers in a systematic way. The Student Solutions Manual for College Physics can be found here under Learning Resources.
  • Additional  problems will be assigned from Calculus-Based Physicsby Jeffery W. Schnick. Please feel free to browse this text, but our use of the text will only be for problemsand their solutions. Although there will be no readings assigned from this text, it may be useful to look at the appropriate sections of the text when working the problems, particularly if you get stuck.
  • University of Toronto: Professor David Harrison’s “Physics Flash Animations”
Requirements for Completion: In order to complete this course, you will need to work through each unit and all of its readings and lectures.  You will also need to complete: 
  • The Final Exam
Note that you will only receive an official grade on your Final Exam.  However, in order to adequately prepare for this exam, you will need to work through the problems assigned throughout the course.

In order to “pass” this course, you will need to earn a 70% or higher on the Final Exam. Your score on the exam will be tabulated as soon as you complete it.  If you do not pass the exam, you may take it again.

Time Commitment: This course should take you a total of about 130 hours to complete.  Each unit includes a “time advisory” that lists the amount of time you are expected to spend on it and each of its subunits.  These should help you plan your time accordingly.  It may be useful to take a look at these time advisories and to determine how much time you have over the next few weeks to complete each unit, and then to set goals for yourself.  For example, Unit 1 should take approximately 6.75 hours.  Perhaps you can sit with your calendar and decide to complete subunit 1.1 (a total of 3.75 hours) on Monday night and subunit 1.2 (a total of 3 hours) on Tuesday night.  Unit 2 should take you 13.25 hours to complete. Perhaps you can schedule time to complete subunit 2.1 (a total of 4 hours) on Wednesday  night; subunit 2.2 (a total of 2.75 hours) on Thursday night; etc.

Tips/Suggestions: Take comprehensive notes as you complete the resources in this course.  It may also help to keep the problems you solve in one notebook for easy reference.  These notes will serve as a useful review as you prepare and study for the Final Exam.

Good luck to you in this undertaking you are about to embark on.

Learning Outcomes  showclose

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  • Explain the difference between a theory and a law.
  • Identify the values of the most common metric prefixes.
  • Compare and contrast distance and displacement.
  • Define and distinguish between vector and scalar physical quantities.
  • Solve 1-dinentional kinematics problems.
  • Describe the effects of gravity on an object’s motion.
  • Add and subtract vectors.
  • Separately analyze the horizontal and vertical motions in projectile problems.
  • Determine the net force on an object.
  • Use Newton's second law of motion to analyze dynamic problems.
  • Solve problems involving springs.
  • Compare and contrast the physical properties associated with linear motion and rotational motion.
  • State Newton's law of gravity in words.
  • Solve problems involving planets and satellites.
  • Define the work done on an object by a force.
  • Describe the relationship between work done and the change in kinetic energy.
  • Describe the concept of potential energy and how it relates to work.
  • Solve dynamics problems using conservation of energy.
  • Describe the distinction between renewable and non-renewable energy sources.
  • State Newton's 2nd law in terms of momentum.
  • Use conservation of momentum to solve collision problems.
  • Define the conditions necessary for a rigid body to be in equilibrium.
  • Solve statics problems.
  • Solve kinematics and dynamic problems involving rotational motion.
  • Compare and contrast the dynamics of linear and rotational motion.
  • Apply energy concepts to rotational motion.

Course Requirements  showclose

In order to take this course, you must:
 
√    Have access to a computer.
 
√    Have continuous broadband Internet access.
 
√    Have the ability/permission to install plug-ins or software (e.g., Adobe Reader or Flash).
 
√    Have the ability to download and save files and documents to a computer.
 
√    Have the ability to open Microsoft files and documents (.doc, .ppt, .xls, etc.).
 
√    Have competency in the English language.
 
√    Have read the Saylor Student Handbook.

Unit Outline show close


Expand All Resources Collapse All Resources
  • Unit 1: Introduction to Physics  

    Our first step in this course is to gain a basic understanding of the language and analytical techniques that are specific to physics.  This unit will include a brief outline of physics and the scientific method, measurement units and scientific notation, and the concepts of significant figures, order-of-magnitude estimates, and scaling.

    Unit 1 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 1 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 1.1 Physical Quantities and Units  
    • Lecture: YouTube: Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s “Lecture 1: Units/Dimensional Analysis/Scaling”

      Link: YouTube: Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s “Lecture 1: Units/Dimensional Analysis/Scaling” (YouTube)

      Also available in:
      iTunes U
      HTML (Transcript)
      PDF (Transcript)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view the entire lecture, pausing to take notes, before moving on to the reading below.

      As mentioned in the course information section, Professor Lewin’s lectures can be difficult and fast-paced. We don’t expect you to immediately be able to fully master all of the content he presents. Note that the most important concepts will be covered within the text you will be reading next. As you watch, focus instead on grasping the major points of the lecture. What do you think they are? Jot these down in your notes. You can also use the Saylor Foundation’s “Lecture Aid” (DOC) as a supplement and guide while watching this lecture. This document includes some useful equations and some of the key points that Professor Lewin makes. If you are determined to master the material covered in this lecture, we applaud you! We recommend watching the sections in which Lewin works on and converts his equations slowly and deliberately. He does a lot of quick calculations, but watch them at your own pace until you feel you can master them. Refer to the Lecture Aid for more assistance.

      Note, too, that the “Powers of 10” video that Lewin refers to has been removed from this recording for copyright reasons. Don’t worry about this; the video establishes the concept of orders of magnitude, which we have defined in the Lecture Aid.

      Watching this lecture should take approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read the Preface and sections 1.1 and 1.2 of “Chapter 1: Introduction: The Nature of Science and Physics,” on pages 7 to 24. Look over the corresponding conceptual questions to test your understanding of the sections. Work on solving problems 4 and 10 on page 33. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve the problems before looking at the solutions. Hint: For question 10, assume that the orbit is perfectly circular and recall that circumference can be found by multiplying the distance x 2 pi.

      Reading this section and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here. Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Optional Reading: The Saylor Foundation’s “Lecture Aid”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Lecture Aid” (DOC)
       
      Instructions: This lecture aid includes some high-level takeaways and equations covered in Lewin’s first lecture. Feel free to add to this document; we deliberately left it in DOC format to encourage you to add to and expand it. Consider sharing your notes with your classmates on our discussion forum for this course.

    • Optional Reading: Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s “Lecture 1 Notes: Thigh Bones (Femur) of Mammals”

      Link: Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s “Lecture 1 Notes: Thigh Bones (Femur) of Mammals” (PDF)

      Instructions: If you are intrigued by Lewin’s discussion of the femurs of mammals, feel free to use his handout to complete your own analysis.

      Terms of Use: This document is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License. It is attributed to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the original version can be found here.

  • 1.2 Accuracy, Precision, and Significant Figures  
    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 1.3 and 1.4 of “Chapter 1: Introduction: The Nature of Science and Physics” (pages 25 to 32).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions to test your understanding of the sections. Work on solving problems 15, 21, and 27 on page 33. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve the problems before looking at the solutions.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: Texas A&M University: “Math Skills Review, Significant Figures”

      Link: Texas A&M University: “Math Skills Review, Significant Figures” (HTML)

      Instructions: After reading the College Physics material, please click on the link above, and review these rules on significant digits.

      Reading this webpage should take approximately 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Unit 1 Assessment  
    • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 1 Assessment”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 1 Assessment”
       
      Instructions: Answer the questions in this assessment to test your knowledge of the material covered in this unit. The answers will be displayed when you click “Submit.”
       
      Note: You must be logged into your Saylor Foundation School account in order to access this assessment.  If you do not yet have an account, you will be able to create one, free of charge, after clicking the link.

  • Unit 2: Motion in a Straight Line  

    Our formal study of physics begins with kinematics, which is defined as the study of motion without considering its causes.  The word “kinematics” comes from a Greek term meaning “motion.”  In this unit, we will study motion without worrying about what forces cause or change it.  Such considerations come in later units.  In this unit, we will examine the simplest type of motion – namely, motion along a straight line, or one-dimensional motion.

    Unit 2 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 2 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 2.1 Vectors, Scalars, and Coordinate Systems  
  • 2.2 Velocity, Speed, and Acceleration  
    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 2.3 and 2.4 of “Chapter 2: Kinematics” (pages 39 to 51).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on pages 77 and 78 to test your understanding of the sections. Work on solving problems 14 and 15 on page 81. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve them before looking at the solutions.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Web Media: University of Toronto: Professor David Harrison’s Physics Flash Animations: “Constant Acceleration”

      Link: University of Toronto: Professor David Harrison’s Physics Flash Animations“Constant Acceleration” (Flash)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and select the play button to launch the animation.  Make sure you understand both the slope (derivative) and areal (integral) meanings of position, velocity, and acceleration.

      Reviewing this material should take approximately 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.3 Motion with Constant Acceleration  
    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 2.5 and 2.6 of “Chapter 2: Kinematics” (pages 51 to 61).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on page 78 to test your understanding of the sections. Work on solving problems 21, 26, and 32 on pages 81 and 82. The solutions arein the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve them before looking at the solutions.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.4 Falling Objects  
    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read section 2.7 of “Chapter 2: Kinematics” (pages 62 to 68).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on page 78 to test your understanding of the sections. Work on solving problems 41 and 47 on pages 82 and 83. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve them before looking at the solutions.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Activity: Saint Anslem College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems”

      Link: Saint Anselm College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems” (PDF)

      Instructions: Work on solving problems 1, 2, and 3 from 106A and 3 from 107.  The solutions are available, but make a serious attempt to solve the problems before looking at the solutions.

      Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.5 Graphical Analysis  
    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read section 2.8 of “Chapter 2: Kinematics” (pages 68 to 75).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on pages 78–80 to test your understanding of the sections. Work on solving problem 59 on page 83. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve the problem before looking at the solution.

      Reading these sections and completing the problem should take approximately 2 hours.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Web Media: University of Toronto: Professor David Harrison’s Physics Flash Animations: “Racing Balls”

      Link:  University of Toronto: Professor David Harrison’s Physics Flash Animations“Racing Balls” (Flash)

      Instructions:  Before running the animation, make an educated guess about which of the two balls will reach the wall first. If your prediction is wrong, figure out why.  To view the animation, click on the link above and then select the play button.  Hint: Think of a speed vs. time graph.

      Reviewing this material should take approximately 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Activity: Saint Anslem College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems”

      Link: Saint Anselm College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems” (PDF)

      Instructions: Work on solving problems 1, 2, and 3 from SAC108. The solutions are available, but make a serious attempt to solve the problems before looking at the solutions.

      Completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Unit 2 Assessment  
    • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 2 Assessment”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 2 Assessment”
       
      Instructions: Answer the questions in this assessment to test your knowledge of the material covered in this unit. The answers will be displayed when you click “Submit.”
       
      Note: You must be logged into your Saylor Foundation School account in order to access this assessment.  If you do not yet have an account, you will be able to create one, free of charge, after clicking the link.

  • Unit 3: Kinematics in Two Dimensions  

    Most motions in nature follow curved paths rather than straight lines. Motion along a curved path on a flat surface or a plane is two-dimensional and thus described by two-dimensional kinematics. Two-dimensional kinematics is a simple extension  of the one-dimensional kinematics covered in the previous unit. This simple extension will allow us to apply physics to many more situations, and it will also yield unexpected insights about nature.

    Unit 3 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 3 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 3.1 Kinematics in Two Dimensions  
    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read section 3.1 of “Chapter 3: Two-Dimensional Kinematics” (pages 85 to 88).

      Reading this section should take approximately 1 hour.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.2 Vector Addition and Subtraction  
  • 3.3 Constant Acceleration Motion  
    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 3.2 and 3.3 of “Chapter 3: Two-Dimensional Kinematics” (pages 88 to 100).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on pages 116 and 117 to test your understanding of the sections.  Work on solving problems 1, 7, 13, and 19 on pages 118 and 119. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve them before looking at the solutions.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Activity: Saint Anselm College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems”

      Link: Saint Anselm College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems” (PDF)

      Instructions: Work on solving problems 1, 2, and 3 from SAC106 and problems 1 through 4 from SAC109A. The solutions are available, but make a serious attempt to solve the problems before looking at the solutions.

      Completing this activity should take approximately 2 hours.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.4 Projectile Motion  
  • Unit 3 Assessment  
    • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 3 Assessment”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 3 Assessment”
       
      Instructions: Answer the questions in this assessment to test your knowledge of the material covered in this unit. The answers will be displayed when you click “Submit.”
       
      Note: You must be logged into your Saylor Foundation School account in order to access this assessment.  If you do not yet have an account, you will be able to create one, free of charge, after clicking the link.

  • Unit 4: Dynamics  

    The study of motion is kinematics, which  describes the way objects move, their velocity, and their acceleration. Dynamicsconsider the forces that affect the motion of moving objects. Newton’s laws of motion are the foundation of dynamics. These laws provide examples of the breadth and simplicity of principles under which nature functions. They are also universal laws in that they apply to similar situations on Earth as well as in space.

    Unit 4 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 4 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 4.1 Newton's First and Second Laws of Motion  
    • Lecture: YouTube: Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s “Lecture 6: Newton’s Laws”

      Link: YouTube: Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s “Lecture 6: Newton’s Laws” (YouTube)

      Also available in:
      iTunes U
      HTML (Transcript)
      PDF (Transcript)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view the entire lecture, pausing to take notes, before moving on to the reading below.

      Watching this lecture should take approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 4.1, 4.2, and 4.3 of “Chapter 4: Dynamics: Force and Newton’s Laws of Motion” (pages 123 to 132).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on pages 155 and 156 to test your understanding of the sections.  Work on solving problems 1, 7, and 13 on page 157. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve them before looking at the solution.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.2 Newton's Third Law of Motion and Normal and Tension Forces  
  • 4.3 Applications of Newton's Laws of Motion  
    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 4.6 and 4.7 of “Chapter 4: Dynamics: Force and Newton’s Laws of Motion” (pages 142 to 150).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on page 156 to test your understanding of the sections.  Work on solving problems 25, 30, 33, 34, 46, 49, and 51 on pages 158–160. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve them before looking at the solutions.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 3 hours.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Activity: Saint Anselm College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems”

      Link: Saint Anselm College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems” (PDF)

      Instructions: Work on solving problems 1 through 10 from SAC114.  The solutions are available, but make a serious attempt to solve the problems before looking at the solutions.

      Completing this activity should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.4 Friction  
  • 4.5 Springs  
  • 4.6 The Simple Pendulum  
  • Unit 4 Assessment  
    • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 4 Assessment”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 4 Assessment”
       
      Instructions: Answer the questions in this assessment to test your knowledge of the material covered in this unit. The answers will be displayed when you click “Submit.”
       
      Note: You must be logged into your Saylor Foundation School account in order to access this assessment.  If you do not yet have an account, you will be able to create one, free of charge, after clicking the link.

  • Unit 5: Circular Motion and Gravity  

    In this unit, we will study the simplest form of curved motion: uniform circular motion, or motion in a circular path at constant speed. In some ways, this unit is a continuation of the previous unit on dynamics, but we will introduce new concepts such as angular velocity and acceleration, centripetal force, and the force of gravity.

    Unit 5 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 5 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 5.1 Angular Velocity and Acceleration  
  • 5.2 Centripetal Force  
  • 5.3 Newton's Law of Gravity  
    • Lecture: YouTube: Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s “Lecture 7: Gravity”

      Link: YouTube: Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s “Lecture 7: Gravity” (YouTube)

      Also available in:
      iTunes U
      HTML (HTML)
      PDF (HTML)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view the entire  lecture, pausing to take notes, before moving on to the reading below.

      Watching this lecture should take approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 6.5 and 6.6 of “Chapter 6: Uniform Circular Motion and Gravitation” (pages 201 to 212).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on page 216 to test your understanding of the sections.  Work on solving problems 33, 39, 45, and 49 on pages 219 and 220. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve them before looking at the solutions.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Activity: Saint Anslem College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems”

      Link: Saint Anselm College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems” (PDF)

      Instructions: Work on solving problems 1 through 4 from SAC115. The solutions are available, but make a serious attempt to solve the problems before looking at the solutions.

      Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Unit 5 Assessment  
    • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 5 Assessment”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 5 Assessment”
       
      Instructions: Answer the questions in this assessment to test your knowledge of the material covered in this unit. The answers will be displayed when you click “Submit.”
       
      Note: You must be logged into your Saylor Foundation School account in order to access this assessment.  If you do not yet have an account, you will be able to create one, free of charge, after clicking the link.

  • Unit 6: Work and Energy  

    Energy is the capacity of a physical system to perform work. It plays an essential role both in everyday events and in scientific phenomena. You can probably  name many forms of energy from that provided by our foods to the energy we use to run our cars to the sunlight that warms us on the beach. Not only does energy have many interesting forms, but it is involved in almost all phenomena and is one of the most important concepts of physics.
     
    Energy can change forms, but it cannot appear from nothing or disappear without a trace. Thus, energy is one of a handful of physical quantities that we say is conserved.

    Unit 6 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 6 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 6.1 Work and Kinetic Energy  
  • 6.2 Conservative Forces and Potential Energy  
    • Lecture: YouTube: Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s “Lecture 14: Orbits and Escape Velocity”

      Link: YouTube: Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s “Lecture 14: Orbits and Escape Velocity” (YouTube)

      Also available in:
      iTunes U
      HTML (HTML)
      PDF (HTML)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above and watch this lecture, pausing to take notes, before moving on to the material below.

      Watching this lecture should take approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 7.3 and 7.4 of “Chapter 7: Work, Energy, and Energy Resources” (pages 228 to 236).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on page 254 to test your understanding of the sections.  Work on solving problem 16 on page 256. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve the problem before looking at the solution.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 6.3 Conservation of Energy  
  • 6.4 Power  
    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 7.7, 7.8, and 7.9 of “Chapter 7: Work, Energy, and Energy Resources” (pages 243 to 251).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on page 255 to test your understanding of the sections.  Work on solving problems 30, 36, 42, 46, 52, and 58 on pages 257–259. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve them before looking at the solutions.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 3 hours.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Activity: Saint Anslem College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems”

      Link: Saint Anselm College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems” (PDF)

      Instructions: Work on solving problems 1 through 4 from SAC124. The solutions are available, but make a serious attempt to solve the problems before looking at the solutions.

      Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Unit 6 Assessment  
    • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 6 Assessment”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 6 Assessment”
       
      Instructions: Answer the questions in this assessment to test your knowledge of the material covered in this unit. The answers will be displayed when you click “Submit.”
       
      Note: You must be logged into your Saylor Foundation School account in order to access this assessment.  If you do not yet have an account, you will be able to create one, free of charge, after clicking the link.

  • Unit 7: Momentum and Collisions  

    We use the term momentum in various ways in everyday language. We speak of sports teams gaining and maintaining the momentum to win. Generally, momentum implies a tendency to continue on course – to move in the same direction – and is associated with mass and velocity. Momentum has its most important application in analyzing collision problems, and, like energy, is important because it is conserved. Only a few physical quantities are conserved in nature, and studying them yields fundamental insight into how nature works, as we shall see in our study of momentum.

    Unit 7 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 7 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 7.1 Momentum and Impulse  
    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 8.1, and 8.2 of “Chapter 8: Linear Momentum and Collisions” (pages 261 to 265).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on page 282 to test your understanding of the sections.  Work on solving problems 1, 9, and 15 on page 284. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve them before looking at the solutions.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Activity: Saint Anslem College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems”

      Link: Saint Anselm College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems” (PDF)

      Instructions: Work on solving problems 1 through 4 from SAC125. The solutions are available, but make a serious attempt to solve the problems before looking at the solutions.

      Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 7.2 Conservation of Momentum in Collisions  
  • 7.3 Collisions in Two Dimensions  
    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 8.6, and 8.7 of “Chapter 8: Linear Momentum and Collisions” (pages 274 to 280).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on page 282 and 283 to test your understanding of the sections.  Work on solving problems 49, 55, 57, and 61 on pages 286 and 287. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve them before looking at the solutions.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Unit 7 Assessment  
    • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 7 Assessment”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 7 Assessment”
       
      Instructions: Answer the questions in this assessment to test your knowledge of the material covered in this unit. The answers will be displayed when you click “Submit.”
       
      Note: You must be logged into your Saylor Foundation School account in order to access this assessment.  If you do not yet have an account, you will be able to create one, free of charge, after clicking the link.

  • Unit 8: Statics and Torque  

    What might desks, bridges, buildings, trees, and mountains have in common – at least in the eyes of a physicist? The answer is that they are ordinarily motionless relative to the Earth. Thus, their acceleration in the Earth frame of reference is zero. Newton’s second law states that net F = ma,so the net external force is zero on all stationary objects and for all objects moving at constant velocity. There are forces acting, but they are balanced. That is, the forces are in equilibrium.

    Unit 8 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 8 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 8.1 Conditions for Equilibrium  
    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 9.1, 9.2, and 9.3 of “Chapter 9: Statics and Torque” (pages 289 to 298).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on page 310 to test your understanding of the sections.  Work on solving problems 1, 6, and 14 on pages 312 and 313. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve them before looking at the solutions.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Web Media: Khan Academy’s “Cross Product and Torque”

      Link: Khan Academy’s “Cross Product and Torque” (YouTube)

      Instructions: This video discusses torque as a cross product of the lever arm and the force vector and illustrates how the direction of the torque is related to the directions of the lever arm and the force.

      Watching this video and pausing to take notes should take you approximately 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Web Media: University of Toronto: Professor David Harrison’s Physics Flash Animations: “Vector Cross Product”

      Link: University of Toronto: Professor David Harrison’s Physics Flash Animations: “Vector Cross Product” (Flash)

      Instructions:In this animation,  you will vary the angle between the two vectors and observe the effect on the cross product.

      Reviewing this material should take approximately 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Activity: Saint Anslem College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems”

      Link: Saint Anselm College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems” (PDF)

      Instructions: Work on solving problems 1 and 2 from SAC118. The solutions are available, but make a serious attempt to solve the problems before looking at the solutions.

      Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 8.2 Applications of Statics  
  • 8.3 Simple Machines  
    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 9.5 and 9.6 of “Chapter 9: Statics and Torque” (pages 301 to 309).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on pages 310 and 311 to test your understanding of the sections.  Work on solving problem 32 on page 314. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve the problems before looking at the solutions.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Unit 8 Assessment  
    • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 8 Assessment”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 8 Assessment”
       
      Instructions: Answer the questions in this assessment to test your knowledge of the material covered in this unit. The answers will be displayed when you click “Submit.”
       
      Note: You must be logged into your Saylor Foundation School account in order to access this assessment.  If you do not yet have an account, you will be able to create one, free of charge, after clicking the link.

  • Unit 9: Angular Momentum  

    Why do tornadoes spin so rapidly? The answer is that the air masses that produce tornadoes are themselves rotating, and when the radii of the air masses decrease, their rate of rotation increases. An ice skater increases her spin in an exactly analogous way. The skater starts her rotation with outstretched limbs and increases her spin by pulling them in toward her body. The same physics describes the spin of a skater and the wrenching force of a tornado. Clearly, force, energy, and power are associated with rotational motion. These and other aspects of rotational motion are covered in this unit. We will see that all important aspects of rotational motion either have already been defined for linear motion or have exact analogs in linear motion.

    Unit 9 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 9 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 9.1 Kinematics of Rotational Motion  
    • Lecture: YouTube: Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s “Lecture 19: Rotating Bodies”

      Link: YouTube: Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s “Lecture 19: Rotating Bodies” (YouTube)

      Also available in:
      iTunes U
      HTML (Transcript)
      PDF (Transcript)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and watch this lecture, pausing to take notes, before moving on to the reading below.

      Watching this lecture should take approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 10.1 and 10.2 of “Chapter 10: Rotational Motion and Angular Momentum” (pages 317 to 326).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on page 348 to test your understanding of the sections.  Work on solving problems 1 and 3 on page 352. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve them before looking at the solutions.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: James H. Dann and James J. Dann’s People’s Physics Book: “Chapter 9: Rotational Motion”

      Link: James H. Dann and James J. Dann’s People’s Physics Book: “Chapter 9: Rotational Motion” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above, scroll down the page to “Ch 9: Rotational Motion,” and  select the link to open the PDF document.  Read the entirety of Chapter 9 after viewing Professor Lewin’s lecture on Rotating Bodies.  From pages 9-4 to 9-10, solve problems 1-4, 10-13, 16, and 21.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 9.2 Dynamics of Rotational Motion  
    • Lecture: YouTube: Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s “Lecture 21: Torque”

      Link: YouTube: Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Professor Walter Lewin’s “Lecture 21: Torque” (YouTube)

      Also available in:
      iTunes U
      HTML (Transcript)
      PDF (Transcript)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and watch this lecture, pausing to take notes, before moving on to the reading below.

      Watching this lecture should take approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: OpenStax College’s College Physics

      Link: OpenStax College’s College Physics (PDF)

      Instructions: Read sections 10.3 and 10.4 of “Chapter 10: Rotational Motion and Angular Momentum” (pages 326 to 336).  Look over the corresponding conceptual questions on page 349 to test your understanding of the sections.  Work on solving problems 10, 16, 24, and 30 on pages 352 and 353. The solutions are in the Student Solution Manual found here under Learning Resources, but make a serious attempt to solve them before looking at the solutions.

      Reading these sections and completing the problems should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

      Terms of Use: This content is available for free here.  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Activity: Saint Anslem College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems”

      Link: Saint Anselm College: Jeffery W. Schnick’s Calculus-Based Physics: “1st Semester SAC Physics Problems” (PDF)

      Instructions: Work on solving problems 3 from SAC103 and 1, 2, and 3 from SAC123. The solutions are available, but make a serious attempt to solve the problems before looking at the solutions.

      Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 9.3 Conservation of Angular Momentum  
  • Unit 9 Assessment  
    • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 8 Assessment”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 8 Assessment”
       
      Instructions: Answer the questions in this assessment to test your knowledge of the material covered in this unit. The answers will be displayed when you click “Submit.”
       
      Note: You must be logged into your Saylor Foundation School account in order to access this assessment.  If you do not yet have an account, you will be able to create one, free of charge, after clicking the link.

  • Final Exam  

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