Course Syllabus for "ARTH209: Twentieth Century Art (OLD)".

This course explores the history of cultural and artistic developments of the twentieth century in the Western world (Europe and the United States). We will concentrate on major styles in painting and sculpture, including Cubism, Fauvism, Futurism, Expressionism, Dada, Surrealism, Pop Art, and Op-Art. We will also discuss Modernism and Post-Modernism in architecture. You will learn about the aesthetic ideals, systems of belief, as well as political, religious, and social conditions that these styles reflect. One of the main objectives of this course is to identify a number of the changes that occurred within Western cultures during the twentieth century and to examine the causes of those developments. Material is presented in chronological order and covers the timeframe between 1870 to the end of the twentieth century. In this course you will be introduced to a variety of terms, such as names of styles, art historical categories, notions, words art historians use to describe, analyze, and critique paintings, sculptures, and architectural buildings. Use the Wikibooks’ Art History Glossary* every time you come across a new term and need clarification. * Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

Course Requirements

In order to take this course, you must:

√    Have access to a computer

√    Have continuous broadband internet access

√    Have the ability/permission to install plug-ins or software (Adobe Reader)

√    Have the ability to open Microsoft files and documents (.doc)

√    Be competent in the English language

√    Have read the Saylor Student Handbook

√    Have completed ARTH111: Introduction to Western Art History: Proto-Renaissance to Contemporary Art

Course Information

Course Information: Welcome to ARTH209.  Below, please find some general information on the course and its requirements.

Course Designer: Anahit Ter-Stepanian, Ph.D.

Primary Resources: The course is based on a wide range of resources, including podcasts from arthistoryunstaffed.com, articles on topics of modern art from the Museum of Modern Art website and World Wide Art Resources, and museum materials on specific exhibits.

Requirements for Completion: To pass this course you will need to have a score of 70% or higher for the Final exam.  You will also have to take the tests for each of the eight units:

Time Commitment: You will need 128 hours to complete the course.

Tips/Suggestions: Please read all assigned materials and take notes.  All end-of-unit quizzes and the Final exam are based on the information included in posted materials. 

Course Overview

  • 5.2 Bauhaus  
  • 5.3 The International Style in Architecture  
  • 5.3.1 Le Corbusier  
  • 5.3.2 Ludwig Mies van der Rohe  
  • Unit 6: The Emergence of Modernism in America and Abstract Expressionism  

    In this unit, we will explore the emergence of Modernism in the United States.  Americans were introduced to Modernism only in 1913, when The Armory Show in New York presented a collection of European modernist artists’ work.  The political turmoil in Western Europe of 1930s forced many of the leading modernist artists to find refuge in the United States shifting the center of modernism to this country.

    Unit 6 Time Advisory

    This unit will take approximately 15 hours to complete.

    ☐    Subunit 6.1: 6 hours

    ☐    Subunit 6.2: 2 hours

    ☐    Subunit 6.3: 6 hours

    Unit6 Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of characteristics and technical principles of American artists and contributors of Abstract Expressionism.
    • Explain the differences between Action Painting and Color Field Painting.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of main contributors to the development of mid-century American Abstractionism.
  • 6.1 The Armory Show in New York, 1913  
  • 6.2 American Art between Wars and after World War II  
  • 6.3 Abstract Expressionism  
  • Unit 7: Pop Art, Land Art, Conceptual Art, Installation Art, Photorealism  

    In this unit, we will discuss the art movements and trends that appeared a reaction against the nonfigurative and abstract art.  First, we will explore Pop Art with its imagery of return to the object, philosophy of commercialization of art, and praise of consumerism. Then, we will focus on Land Art and installations. At the end of the unit, we will explore Conceptual art and some examples of Photorealism. 

    Unit 7 Time Advisory

    This unit will take approximately 36 hours to complete.

    ☐    Subunit 7.1: 3 hours

    ☐    Subunit 7.2: 3 hours

    ☐    Subunit 7.3: 4 hours

    ☐    Subunit 7.4: 4 hours

    ☐    Subunit 7.5: 3 hours

    ☐    Subunit 7.6: 3 hours

    ☐    Subunit 7.7: 3 hours

    ☐    Subunit 7.8: 3 hours

    ☐    Subunit 7.9: 3 hours

    ☐    Subunit 7.10: 4 hours

    ☐    Subunit 7.11: 3 hours

    Unit7 Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

    • Describe and identify characteristics and technical principles of Pop Art, Minimalist art, Action sculpture, and post-war sculpture.
    • Explain the philosophy and beliefs of Pop and Minimalist artists.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of main contributors to the development of Pop Art in the United States, Minimalist art, post-war sculpture.
  • 7.1 Pop Art  
  • 7.2 Andy Warhol  

    Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 7.1.  Please focus on the page about Andy Warhol that appears after you have clicked on “Detail View” beneath the artist’s name.

  • 7.3 Roy Lichtenstein  

    Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 7.1.  Please focus on the page about Roy Lichtenstein that appears after you have clicked on “Detail View” beneath the artist’s name.

  • 7.4 Sculpture: Claes Oldenburg and George Segal  
  • 7.4.1 Claes Oldenburg  
  • 7.4.2 George Segal  
  • 7.5 Minimalist Art  
  • 7.6 Action Sculpture: Joseph Beuys  
  • 7.7 Installation Art  
  • 7.8 Land Art  
  • 7.9 Christo and Jeanne-Claude  
  • 7.10 Conceptual Art  
  • 7.11 Photorealism  
  • Unit 8: After-War and Post-Modernist Architecture  

    After WWII, a number of architectural styles emerged.  We will first discuss Brutalism, the last modernist trend in the twentieth-century architecture. In 1955, Le Corbusier saw completion of one of his most innovative design ideas – the Norte Dame du Haut church in Ronchamp, France.  The building is considered the icon of Brutalism, a style that found responses in the United States as well.  Brutalism is characterized by the use of textured concrete surfaces.  Then, we will explore Post-Modern architecture, which became a reaction against Modernist minimalism and rejection of historicism. At the end, we will study Deconstructivism, a style which displays distorted geometrical shapes, bold use of color, non-traditional building materials, curvilinear displaced forms, and dynamic facades. 

    Unit 8 Time Advisory

    This unit will take approximately 15 hours to complete.

    ☐    Subunit 8.1: 5 hours

    ☐    Subunit 8.2: 5 hours

    ☐    Subunit 8.3: 5 hours

    Unit8 Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

    • Describe and identify characteristics and technical principles of Brutalism, Post-Modern architecture, and Deconstructivism.
    • Explain the design features of Brutalism, Post-Modern architecture, and Deconstructivism.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of main contributors to the development of Brutalism, Post-Modern architecture, and Deconstructivism.
  • 8.1 Brutalism  
  • 8.2 Postmodernism Art and Architecture  
  • 8.3 Deconstructivism  
  • Unit 9: Final Exam