Monday Morning Roundup: What We’ve Got Here is Failure to Ameliorate (College Costs)

Tuition. Loans. Aid. (Up; up; down…). If only there were a cheat code for higher education, right?


College net price is rising” (Washington Post)
I know…we couldn’t believe it either (kidding). The upshot here is that College Board has released a report checking in on recent price trends in public & private tuitions, as well as student borrowing. Surprise, surprise: tuitions are up, borrowing is up, while public funding and direct financial aid is down. And that’s what is meant by “net” price — tuition “has long risen faster than inflation,” but in a change over the past couple of years, “financial aid is not keeping pace.”

Students’ Debt Loads Increase Again” (Inside Higher Ed)
Herein, a bit more information about students borrowing habits, based on a report from the Institute for College Access and Success.

College sticker prices in Washington region” (Washington Post)
A little clarification on the net vs. sticker costs of higher ed institutions, and a price list for the region’s colleges.

Viewpoint: For-Profit Education is Not Dead Yet” (TIME)
In which the author calls us all the transistor radios of education. And the metaphor kind of works. (Thanks to Steph S. for the link!)

Bits and Pieces:

Minnesota clarifies: Free online ed is okay” (Washington Post)
So, some of the recent news, in case you’ve missed it, concerns an…unfortunate…twenty-years-young law in Minnesota that seems to have proactively forgotten about the Internet. Yeah, they’ve been the target of a few jokes, but they’ve spoken out to (mostly) dispel our fears.

The Internet Agenda” (Inside Higher Ed)
Offered here in the spirit of fair play, this opinion piece by a University of Virginia prof expresses some qualms about new trends in education. U.Va. has recently partnered with a certain big-name MOOC provider, but is also still dealing with the repercussions of this summer’s controversy — a decent excuse for some skittishness. Related: this fascinating read.

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