Documentary film screening (D.C.): Courageous Learning

If you are in D.C., consider this event for your calendar; if not, keep an eye out for this documentary film (and when you spot it, watch it).

The U.S. Congressional E-Learning Caucus hosts the premier of documentary film Courageous Learning on June 23, 2014 at noon in the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center (Room HVC-200).

From the announcement by the caucus:

Courageous Learning is a documentary exploring challenges, barriers and paths involved in obtaining an education as a veteran, working adult, single parent, and anyone else whose life got in the way of finishing higher education.

More to the point, this film tells the stories of several individuals who represent hundreds of thousands — probably millions — of people worldwide. This film does not dwell on tragedy-in-slow-motion or waste time castigating the system: it focuses on real people finding real education solutions in concert with the organizations that work to secure the future of higher education, such as Saylor Academy partner school Excelsior College.

Note that those who wish to attend the screening should RSVP to [email protected]

The event will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by Amy Laitinen of the New America Foundation, and including:

  • Tony Carnavale, Director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce
  • Force Master Chief Tom Snee, USN (Ret) Adult Student and Executive Director, Fleet Reserve Association
  • Mark Stevenson, Student at University of Maryland University College
  • Dr. Gene McClellan, Applied Research Associates

 

2 thoughts on “Documentary film screening (D.C.): Courageous Learning

  1. June 23, 2014

    Kerry Lippert Reply

    People should be able to take free college courses in the United States. Saylor.org should also become accredited.

    • June 26, 2014

      Sean Connor Reply

      As controversial as free education can be in the U.S., there seems to be broad political consensus that the cost needs to come down radically. While only a minority of students pay a full tuition, many who would be qualified for grants and other subsidies are too discouraged by sticker shock to even apply (or they have no desire to take on student loans). I don’t know that accreditation is in our future (I don’t know that is is not in our future, either), but we will keep working to make connections to affordable credit!

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