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Art Appreciation and Techniques

Purpose of Course  showclose

Please note: Our faculty members have indicated that several important changes need to be made in order to improve the course and your experience as a student. In 2013, we will be re-releasing this course under the simplified title: ARTH101: Art Appreciation and Techniques. Until then, you are welcome to work through this course at your own leisure; there’s still a lot to learn here! After that date, you will still be able to access this version of the course as an “archived” course, but we will no longer be maintaining it.

Please let us know if you have any questions or suggestions at http://www.saylor.org/feedback

The goal of this course is to encourage you to develop an interest in and appreciation for art in all its variety and learn how to express this appreciation in an informed and critical way.  The first and shortest unit asks: “What is art?” and works toward an understanding of its place and purposes in our lives and world.  The second unit will present you with some vocabulary commonly used to describe and analyze art and introduce you to what is often referred to as the “language of art”: the elements of design (such as line or color) and the principles of design that govern the way those elements come together in an artwork.  In the third and fourth units of the course, we will explore a host of different media (two-dimensional as well as three-dimensional) and take a look at the specific techniques associated with each of them.  The last two units of this course survey the development of art from the time of cave paintings to the present.  We will discuss the determining impact cultural context has on art.

Note: Throughout this course, we will use one primary textbook: Professor Charlotte Jirousek’s “Art, Design, and Visual Thinking.”  You may want to bookmark this webpage now for ease of use.  This resource is an online textbook that was designed to support a course Professor Jirousek teaches at Cornell University.  The link to the textbook is http://char.txa.cornell.edu/.  The table of contents of the textbook, which is the component of the site we will be using, is on the left side of the webpage.  The passages assigned as readings can be accessed by scrolling down in the table of contents.  Note that the author frequently embeds links to other sites in his entries; as you work through the assigned readings, please be sure to visit each of the links she includes.

Note that this course is an alternative to ARTH101B, and that you may choose to take either ARTH101A or ARTH101B in order to learn the basics of Art Appreciation and Techniques.  These courses cover the same material, but in a slightly different way.

Course Information  showclose

Welcome to ARTH101.  Below, please find general information on this course and its requirements. 

Course Designer: Elisabeth Miller

Primary Resources: This course requires you to learn from a multiplicity of free online resources.  However, one resource will serve as the main reference and can be considered the course textbook:

The following resource will also be used repeatedly throughout the entirety of the course:

Requirements for Completion: In order to complete this course you will need to work through each unit of the course and pass the Final Exam with a score of 70% or higher.  If you do not pass the exam, you may take it again.  Included within the units are readings, lectures, videos, and assignments or exercises that we have called “guided observations.”  While the “guided observations” are not graded, the Final Exam will test you on the knowledge you acquired completing them.

Time Commitment: This course should take you approximately 55 hours to complete.  The time advisories listed under each unit title will help you organize your calendar.  Since units are unequal in the time investment they require on your part, you may want to take a look at the time advisories for each unit before you begin the course.  

Tips/Suggestions: In addition to reading the material, listening to the lectures, watching the videos, and completing the assignments, you will need to take careful notes and spend time reviewing to be able to assimilate the information you will be tested on in the Final Exam.  The instructional boxes accompanying the links to the course resources will help you focus your study.    



Learning Outcomes  showclose

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  • Provide several different definitions of the term “visual arts.”
  • Explain the debates that surround the act of defining art.
  • List and discuss some of the roles that the visual arts have historically played.
  • Define and apply terms used to describe and analyze a work of visual art.
  • Describe and discuss works of visual art using appropriate vocabulary.
  • Define and explain in a technical fashion the different methods, mediums, and materials that artists use to create two-dimensional and three-dimensional works of visual art.
  • Compare and contrast different methods, mediums, and materials artists use to create two-dimensional and three-dimensional works of visual art.
  • Identify the important stylistic developments in the history of art.
  • Compare and contrast the artistic styles that have defined different historical eras and geographies.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the importance of acknowledging cultural and historical contexts when approaching art.

Course Requirements  showclose

In order to take this course, you must:

√    Have access to a computer.

√    Have continuous broadband internet access.

√    Have the ability/permission to install plug-ins or software (e.g. Adobe Reader of Flash).

√    Have the ability to download and save files and documents to a computer.

√    Have the ability to open Microsoft files and documents (.doc, .ppt, .xls, etc.).

√    Be competent in the English language.

√    Have read the Saylor Student Handbook.

Unit Outline show close


Expand All Resources Collapse All Resources
  • Unit 1: What Is Art?  

    This unit asks a series of basic questions about the nature of art: What is it?  Does art record truth?  Does it record beauty?  Does it imitate the world around us or does it express a more important truth than nature itself does?  Does it create fantasy?  Does one need to be skilled to create art?  When French artist Marcel Duchamp repositioned, signed, and titled a urinal “Fountain” in 1917, presenting it as a work of art, it was neither the first nor the last time that the exhibition of a supposed art object would end in controversy and stir debate on what constitutes the criteria by which an object can be called “art.”  While different definitions of art abound, art, either as a product, process, or skill, has been made an integral part of our living environments since the days of prehistoric cave paintings.  Whether it expresses an idea of beauty, an opinion, a worldview, or emotions, or whether it strives to record the world or lift viewers out of complacency, art always functions outside of a basic fight for survival.  Art can express and create meaning in our lives and, though we may need art to make our lives pleasurable or significant, we do not use it to survive on a physical level. 

    In this unit, we will familiarize ourselves with different definitions of art and explore the themes that art commonly treats.

    Unit 1 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 1 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 1.1 Common Roles Assumed by the Visual Arts  
    • Reading: Cornell University: Charlotte Jirousek’s Art, Design, and Visual Thinking: “Purposes of Art”

      Link: Cornell University: Charlotte Jirousek’s Art, Design, and Visual Thinking: “Purposes of Art” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: When you click on the above link, scroll down in the left pane of the webpage titled “Table of Contents” until you find the heading “Purposes of Art.”  Click on this link and then read the passage “Purposes of Art.”  Please read the passage to get a sense for the many different roles art can fulfill.  

      This reading should take approximately 15 minutes to complete. 
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.2 Toward a Definition of Art  
    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org’s “Duchamp and the Ready-Mades”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s "Duchamp and the Ready-Mades" (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please watch this video in order to get a sense, through the specific example of Marcel Duchamp’s art, for the debates inherent in the definition of art.
       
      About the link: SmartHistory.org is an open textbook on art and art history.  Watching this video should take approximately 10 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Reading: Cornell University: Charlotte Jirousek’s Art, Design, and Visual Thinking: “The Evolution of the Idea of Art”

      Link: Cornell University: Charlotte Jirousek’s Art, Design, and Visual Thinking: "The Evolution of the Idea of Art" (HTML)
       
      Instructions: This passage is situated just below the passage “Purposes of Art” in the table of contents of the webpage above.  Please read the passage in its entirety to get a sense for how art can be defined.  Note that the definition has changed throughout history and across cultures. 

      This reading should take approximately 15 minutes to complete. 

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: The University of British Columbia: Dr. Robert J. Belton’s Art History: A Preliminary Handbook: “What is Art?”

      Link: The University of British Columbia: Dr. Robert J. Belton’s Art History: A Preliminary Handbook: “What is Art?” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read this passage in order to get a sense for how art is most commonly defined.

      This reading should take approximately 10 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy’s “The Definition of Art”

      Link: The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: "The Definition of Art" (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read this entry in order to get a sense for what makes an art object different from other objects.  Pay attention to the entry’s discussion of the questions and controversies that can arise when one tries to define art.
       
      About the link: The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy was conceived and is maintained by experts in the field.  While it is a constantly evolving encyclopedia, cited articles are taken from a fixed edition in the archive of the encyclopedia.  This reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Activity: The Saylor Foundation’s ARTH101: Guided Observation 1

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s ARTH101: Guided Observation 1 (PDF)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above for further thought on the debates that can arise when trying to define art.

      This activity should take approximately 1 hour to complete.

    • Activity: The Saylor Foundation’s ARTH101: Guided Observation 2

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s ARTH101: Guided Observation 2 (PDF)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above to further examine, through the observation of Eugène Delacroix’s Liberty Leading the People, the many roles that can be fulfilled by one artwork. 

      This activity should take approximately 1 hour to complete.

  • Unit 2: Becoming Art-Literate  

    The Visual Arts can communicate stories, opinions, thoughts, and emotions through visual means.  Through formal elements of design, like line, shape, space, movement, color, light, texture, and pattern, artists can give meaning to their work.  The way in which these elements are organized in an artwork to form a whole pertains to the principles of design.  The principles of design can be thought of as the “grammar” of the visual arts.  “Styles” in art are identifiable when a group of artworks share characteristic formal attributes.  A “style” can be specific to one artist or a group of artists, but it is also partly culturally determined and a result of the social and historical influences merging in the place the artist is working in.

    Since it is difficult to speak about artworks without mentioning an area or time of provenance, this unit will first introduce you to the common chronological delimitations used to study art and give you a glimpse into the way style can be culturally determined.  We will then explore the elements and principles of design and familiarize ourselves with the vocabulary commonly used to describe and analyze artworks.  Learning how to speak about art will enable you to become conscious of the way art “speaks” its own language.

    Unit 2 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 2 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 2.1 Useful Preliminaries: Art and Chronology  
    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org’s “For the Very Beginner”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “For the Very Beginner” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please read this article (PDF) and watch this video for some useful preliminaries about art as it relates to history.  You will also get a glimpse of how style can evolve over time.
       
      About the Link: SmartHistory.org is an open textbook on art and art history.  Watching this video and reading the text should take approximately 20 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: The article and video above are released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  It is attributed to SmartHistory.org and the original version can be found here (HTML and Adobe Flash). 

  • 2.2 Form and Content  
  • 2.3 The Language of Design: The Elements of Design  

    Note: Depending on the resource you are interacting with, the “elements of design” will also be referred to as the “visual elements of art,” the “visual elements of design,” the “plastic elements of design,” the “plastic elements of art,” the “formal elements of design,” or the “formal elements of art.”  Together with the principles of design that we will address in the following sub-unit, the visual elements constitute what is called the “language of design” or the “language of art.”

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org’s “The Skill of Describing”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “The Skill of Describing” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please watch this video to get a sense for the way speaking about the formal attributes of a work of art can uncover meaning.  The video will also address how the form and the content of a piece are intrinsically merged.
       
      About the Link: SmartHistory.org is an open textbook on art and art history.  Watching this video should take approximately 5 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  It is attributed to SmartHistory.org and the original version can be found here (Adobe Flash).

    • Reading: Cornell University: Charlotte Jirousek’s Art, Design, and Visual Thinking: “Language of Design”

      Link: Cornell University: Charlotte Jirousek’s Art, Design, and Visual Thinking: "Language of Design" (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read the passage “Language of Design.”  You can find it by going to the table of contents of the textbook situated on the left pane of the webpage above. 

      This reading should take approximately 30 minutes to complete. 

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage.

    • Lecture: Cerritos College: “The Language of Art”

      Link: Cerritos College: "The Language of Art" (mp3)?

      Instructions: This recording is part of a series of podcasts for an ART100 course taught at Cerritos College, a community college in California.  Please click on “Podcasts” and download and listen to the recording in its entirety (1 hour, 19 minutes).  This lecture covers the formal elements of an artwork, the principles of design (called the “principles of composition” in the podcast), and materials and techniques commonly used by artists.  Many of the images discussed in this lecture are available under “Images” on the same page; please open these in a separate window while you are listening to the podcast.  Note that this lecture covers the material you need to know for subunits 2.3–2.4 and units 3–4. 
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.3.1 Point and Line  
  • 2.3.2 Form, Shape, Space, and Movement  
  • 2.3.3 Light and Color  
    • Reading: Webexhibits.org’s Causes of Color: “Vision: Eye and Mind,” and “Vision: Color Theory”

      Links: Webexhibits.org’s Causes of Color:Vision: Eye and Mind” (HTML), and “Vision: Color Theory” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read these passages that describe the ways in which we perceive light and color.  Note that each passage is several pages long.  Please click on “Next” every time you reach the bottom of a page if that option is available.

      This reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Work license: you may share the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and that you do not alter, transform, or build upon it.

    • Lecture: Kent State University: Instructor Jack McWhorter’s “Color Theory”

      Link: Kent State University: Instructor Jack McWhorter’s "Color Theory" (iTunes U)
       
      Instructions: These recordings are available through iTunes.  Please listen to the following tracks on color theory, which are part of the series of recordings entitled “Color Theory”: “Components of Color,” “Hue,” “Value,” “Temperature,” “Color Harmony,” “Color Keys,” “Color Symbolism,” “Complementary Color,” “Descriptive and Subjective Color,” “Local Color,” “Interaction,” and “Mixing Pigments.”

      Listening to these recordings should take approximately 1 hour to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage above.

  • 2.3.4 Pattern and Texture  
  • 2.4 The Language of Design: The Principles of Design  

    Note: This subunit is covered by the lecture assigned beneath subunit 2.3.  Please focus on the lecture from about 39:50 to 56:50 (17 mins.).  Together with the elements of design, the principles of design constitute the language of design.  The “principles of design” can also be referred to as the “principles of composition.”

  • 2.4.1 Balance  
  • 2.4.2 Proportion  
  • 2.4.3 Rhythm  
  • 2.4.4 Emphasis  
  • 2.4.5 Unity  
  • Unit 3: Two-Dimensional Media  

    The tools, materials, and techniques an artist uses have a direct impact on an artwork’s formal aspect.  An artist usually chooses his/her media based on the formal result he/she is trying to attain.  When artists of the Renaissance in Northern Europe started using oil paint, for example, they realized that they could render texture in a realistic or “tactile” way.  As a consequence, their paintings started displaying astonishing detail in the rendering of surfaces.  

    In this unit, we will study the media (or materials) from which artists can choose.  We will learn about media used to create two-dimensional works of art, such as paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, and films.


    Note: This unit is covered by the lecture assigned beneath subunit 2.3.  Please focus on the lecture from 1:01:55- 1:11:50 and 1:16:50-1:18:20 (11mins).

    Unit 3 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 3 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 3.1 Painting  
  • 3.1.1 Encaustic  
  • 3.1.2 Fresco Secco and Fresco  
  • 3.1.3 Egg Tempera Versus Oil Paint  
    • Reading: Webexhibits.org’s Color Vision and Art: “Light, Color and Vision: Paints”

      Link: Webexhibits.org’s  Color Vision and Art: “Light, Color and Vision: Paints” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read the four pages within the section “Paints” by clicking on “Next” each time you reach the bottom of a page.  The pages you will have read are titled: “From Egg Tempera to Oil,” “How the Paints Differ,” “Applying the Paint and the Technique of Color Modeling,” and “Optical Qualities of the Paint Surface.”

      This reading should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Work license: you may share the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and that you do not alter, transform or build upon it.

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org’s “Tempera Paint”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s "Tempera Paint" (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please watch this video to gain an understanding of the medium of egg tempera paint, which was very commonly used at the beginning of the Renaissance period, as well as the techniques (such as hatching) and effects associated with it.
       
      About the Link: SmartHistory.org is an open textbook on art and art history.  Watching this video should take approximately 15 minutes.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Reading: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Oil Painting: Materials and Techniques”

      Link: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Oil Painting: Materials and Techniques” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read the short article to reinforce your knowledge of the properties of oil paint as well as to get a feel for the wide range of effects it can produce when applied with varying types of brushes.

      This reading should take approximately 10 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the museum’s website.

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org’s “Oil Paint”

      Link: SmartHistory.org's "Oil Paint" (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please watch this video to get a feel for the way the medium of oil paint was used during the Renaissance, its impact on the history of Western art, and the effects that can be achieved through its use.  Be particularly attentive to the video’s mention of the medium’s luminosity, versatility, and expressivity.  Note that this medium enables the artist to blend colors directly on the canvas.
       
      About the Link: SmartHistory.org is an open textbook on art and art history.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

  • 3.1.4 Mosaic  
  • 3.1.5 Watercolor  
  • 3.1.6 Acrylic  
  • 3.1.7 Collage  
  • 3.2 Drawing  
  • 3.2.1 The Materials and Techniques  
    • Reading: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Drawing Materials and Media”

      Link: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Drawing Materials and Media” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read the above.  Take careful notes on the important materials and mediums that have been used throughout history to draw.  Please also click on the thumbnail images embedded within the article to view drawings and read about them.

      This reading should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the museum’s website.

  • 3.2.2 Drawing in Traditional Artistic Education  
  • 3.3 Printmaking  
  • 3.3.1 Relief Prints  
  • 3.3.2 Intaglio  
  • 3.3.3 Lithography  
  • 3.3.4 Silkscreen  
  • 3.4 Photography and the Motion Picture  
  • 3.4.1 The Process of Photography  
  • 3.4.2 Photography as Art  
    • Reading: SmartHistory.org’s “Early Modern Photography”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s "Early Modern Photography" (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read this article in order to get a sense for the way photography made its way into the category of “art” in the early twentieth century. 
       
      About the Link: SmartHistory.org is an open textbook on art and art history.  This reading should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org’s “Cartier-Bresson’s Behind the Gare St.Lazare”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Cartier-Bresson’s Behind the Gare St.Lazare” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please watch this video, in which Henri Cartier-Bresson’s photograph entitled “Behind the Gare Saint Lazare,” is discussed.  Pay particular attention to the topics of photography as snapshot and photography as art.  Listen carefully to the discussion of the visual elements and principles of design present within this photograph.
       
      About the Link: SmartHistory.org is an open textbook on art and art history.  This video will take approximately 5 minutes to watch.
       
      Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  It is attributed to SmartHistory.org and the original version can be found here (Adobe Flash).

  • 3.4.3 From Still Images to Motion Pictures  
    • Reading: Paul Burns’ The History of the Discovery of Cinematography: chapters 13, 14 and 15.

      Link: Paul Burns’ The History of the Discovery of Cinematography: chapters 13, 14 and 15. (HTML)

      Instructions: Read chapters 13, 14, and 15 from the textbook above.  You will find them by going to the table of contents situated on the left pane of the webpage above.  Focus on the following entries: “1887, Eadweard James Muybridge,” “1888, Louis Aimé Augustin Le Prince,” “1888, Marie Georges Jean Melies,” “1889, Thomas Edison,” “1893, Eadweard James Muybridge,” the two entries titled “1895, Auguste-Louis Lumière,” and the entry titled “The Lumière Experimental Films.”
       
      About the Link: The History of the Discovery of Cinematographywas written by Paul Burns, a film historian and author.  This reading should take approximately 3 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Unit 4: Three-Dimensional Media  

    In this fourth unit, we will explore the tools, materials, and techniques used to create three-dimensional works of art like sculptures, architectural works, certain craft objects, and decorative arts.  Note that viewers approach sculptures or buildings in motion, and can either circle the artwork or enter into it—quite different from the way in which viewers approach two-dimensional artworks.  Sculptures and architecture thus offer a variety of viewpoints to the observer.  The materials a sculptor or architect chooses need to obey some physical properties that do not apply to two-dimensional art works.  For example, while we have seen that two-dimensional artworks often achieve visual balance, or the illusion of mass, a three-dimensional artwork will also have to take into account the actual properties of balance or weight.

    Note: This unit is covered by the lecture assigned beneath subunit 2.3.  Please focus on the lecture from 1:11:50-1:16:50 (5mins).

    Unit 4 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 4 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 4.1 Sculpture: Additive versus Subtractive Techniques  
  • 4.1.1 Casting, an Additive Technique  
    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org’s “Bronze Casting”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Bronze Casting” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please watch this video to gain an understanding of the Lost-Wax technique, which was for many centuries the most common technique of casting bronze.
       
      About the Link: SmartHistory.org is an open textbook on art and art history.  This video will take approximately 10 minutes to watch.
       
      Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  It is attributed to SmartHistory.org and the original version can be found here (Adobe Flash). 

  • 4.1.2 Carving, a Subtractive Technique  
    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org’s “Quarrying and Carving Marble”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Quarrying and Carving Marble” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please watch this video to gain an understanding of the technique of carving marble through the example of Michelangelo, a master of the medium.  Please note the difference between “additive” processes of sculpture and “subtractive” processes of sculpture.
       
      About the Link: SmartHistory.org is an open textbook on art and art history.  This video will take approximately 10 minutes to watch.
       
      Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  It is attributed to SmartHistory.org and the original version can be found here (Adobe Flash). 

  • 4.2 Some Common Materials of Sculpture and Other Three-Dimensional Craft Objects  
  • 4.2.1 Techniques of Working Metal  
  • 4.2.2 Wood  
  • 4.2.3 Glass  
  • 4.2.4 Ceramics  
  • 4.2.5 Textiles  
    • Web Media: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Jacquard Weaving”

      Link: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Jacquard Weaving” (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please watch this short video for an introduction to the process of weaving.  The video will first show you the basic technique for weaving.  Make sure you understand what a “loom” and a “plain weave” are.  The video will then introduce you to the “Jacquard weaving” technique.  Note that to make designs with the process of weaving, the decorative designs are woven within the fabric of the textile.  The designs, therefore, have to be completely planned for before the textile is woven with the loom.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the museum’s website.

    • Web Media: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Oriental Carpet Videos by Jennifer Wearden”

      Link: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Oriental Carpet Videos by Jennifer Wearden” (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please go to the webpage above and watch all the associated videos.  Curator Jennifer Wearden introduces us to oriental carpets and the techniques attached to their production.  Take notes on the important vocabulary and techniques she introduces throughout these videos.  The videos you should have viewed when you complete this subunit are as follows: “Oriental Carpets: Curator’s Introduction,” “Oriental Carpets: Basic Carpet Structure,” “Oriental Carpets: Carpet Construction,” “Oriental Carpets: Warp, Weft, and Knots,” “Oriental Carpets: Top and Bottom,” “Oriental Carpets: Edges,” “Oriental Carpets: Symmetrical Knots,” “Oriental Carpets: Counting Symmetrical Knots,” “Oriental Carpets: Assymetrical Knots,” “Oriental Carpets: Counting Assymetrical Knots,” “Oriental Carpets: Colour Variation,” “Oriental Carpets: Colour Abrash,” and “Oriental Carpets: Colour Corrosion.”

      These videos will take approximately 15 minutes to watch.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the museum’s website.

    • Reading: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Samplers, Stitches, and Techniques”

      Link: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Samplers, Stitches and Techniques” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read the article.  It will introduce you to techniques of embroidery.

      This reading should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the museum’s website.

    • Reading: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Introduction to Quilting”

      Link: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Introduction to Quilting” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read the article.  It will introduce you to techniques of quilting as well as to the historical significance of this medium.

      This reading should take approximately 10 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the museum’s website.

  • 4.3 Architecture  
    • Reading: The Eastman House Museum’s “Shapes and Shelters: Image Notes”

      Link: The Eastman House Museum’s “Shapes and Shelters: Image Notes” (HTML)
       
      Also available in:
      Microsoft Word (without photos; select link from box at top of page)
      PDF (without photos; select link from box at top of page)
       
      Instructions: Please read this page to get an idea of the most common building techniques and architectural forms as well as their place within the history of architecture.

      This reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.4 Decorative Arts  
  • 4.4.1 The Victorian Era  
  • 4.4.2 Arts and Crafts  
    • Reading: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “The Arts and Crafts Movement”

      Link: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “The Arts and Crafts Movement”
       
      Instructions: Please read the article while taking careful notes on the reasons behind and the facts surrounding the emergence of the Arts and Crafts Movement.

      This reading should take approximately 5 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the museum’s website.

    • Web Media: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Learn About Style: Arts and Crafts”

      Link: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Learn About Style: Arts and Crafts”
       
      Instructions: Please go to the webpage above.  Work through the five categories that you can access at the bottom of the page: “Learn About Style,” “People,” “Building and Interiors,” “Related Style,” and “Take the Quiz.”  Note that within each category, different subcategories can be accessed by clicking on thumbnail images. 

      This reading should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the museum’s website.

    • Web Media: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “International Arts and Crafts Microsite”

      Link: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “International Arts and Crafts Microsite” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please go to the webpage above.  It was made in the context of a temporary exhibition held at the Victoria and Albert Museum in 2005.  It will introduce you to the international reach of the Arts and Crafts Movement.  First, click on “The Exhibition.”  Read the passages “Britain,” “Europe,” “America,” and “Japan” by clicking on their titles, and by clicking "Next Page" above the text.  Then, go back to “Home,” and click on “Explore.”  From there, view the “Exhibition Highlights.”  You can also go on an online tour by clicking on “Virtual Tour.”

      Reading, and viewing the exhibit should take approximately 45 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the museum’s website.

  • 4.4.3 Art Nouveau  
    • Reading: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Study Room Resource: Art Nouveau”

      Link: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Study Room Resource: Art Nouveau” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read the article.  Though it was developed as a guide to the two-dimensional Art Nouveau resources in the Victoria and Albert Prints and Drawings Study Room, it is a good introduction to Art Nouveau as a whole.  Please also click on the thumbnail images at the bottom of the article to view and learn more about specific Art Nouveau artworks.  

      This reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the museum’s website.

    • Web Media: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Art Nouveau Glass”

      Link: The Victoria and Albert Museum’s “Art Nouveau Glass” (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please watch the video, which takes a close look at Art Nouveau Glass vessels while at the same time discussing the Art Nouveau movement more broadly.

      This video will take approximately 10 minutes to watch.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the museum’s website.

      The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

      Submit Materials

  • 4.4.4 Art Deco  
  • 4.4.5 Frank Lloyd Wright  
  • 4.4.6 De Stijl  
  • 4.4.7 Bauhaus/Modern  
  • 4.4.8 Post-Modern  
  • Unit 5: Art in Time and Place: The Western World  

    The formal and stylistic aspects of artworks are often largely determined by the era and location in which they were created.  In this unit, we will study art through its evolution in time and place in the Western world.  You will develop the tools you need to identify the major formal and stylistic trends punctuating the timeline of Western Art History.  This approach will enable us to see the relationship between works of art and their specific social-historical contexts.  This unit will also reveal a certain continuum that runs through Western Art, from Ancient Greece to modern times.

    Unit 5 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 5 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 5.1 Earliest Art: Cave Paintings  
    • Reading: SmartHistory.org’s “Origins”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s "Origins" (PDF)
       
      Also available in:
      YouTube
       
      Instructions: Please read this article and watch this video in order to get a sense for the way art and representation have been an inherent part of human activity since the Paleolithic period.  Note the way in which paintings that have been recovered from that time period tend to revolve around the themes of game, hunting, and fertility.
       
      About the Link: SmartHistory.org is an open textbook on art and art history.  This reading and video should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  It is attributed to SmartHistory.org and the original version can be found here (HTML and Adobe Flash). 

  • 5.2 Art of the Ancient Near East and Egypt  
  • 5.2.1 Art of the Ancient Near East  
  • 5.2.2 The Art of Ancient Egypt  
    • Reading: The Ancient Egypt Site’s “The History of Ancient Egypt”

      Link: The Ancient Egypt Site’s “The History of Ancient Egypt” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please go to the webpage above.  Click on “History.”  After you have read this first page, click on “Early Dynastic Period” at the bottom of the page.  Read “Early Dynastic Period.”  From there, click on “Step Pyramid” within the text to read about the kinds of pyramids that were being built in the early Dynastic period.  Once you have read about the stepped pyramid, go back to “Early Dynastic Period” and click on “Narmer Palette,” at the bottom of the page.  You will learn about the Narmer Palette, an important representative of early Egyptian art. 

      Then, go to the following period of Ancient Egyptian history, “Old Kingdom,” accessible from the table of contents located on the left pane of the screen.  When you get to the end of the page, click on “Giza” to learn about the Great Pyramids. 

      Next, go to the table of contents to access and read “1st Intermediate Period.”  From the table of contents, also access and read the pages “Middle Kingdom,” “2nd Intermediate Period,” and “New Kingdom.”  When you have reached the bottom of the page titled “New Kingdom,” click on “Valley of the Kings” and proceed to read that page. 

      Then, from the table of contents, access and read the pages titled “Late Dynastic Period” and “Greek-Roman.”  While working through this material, pay close attention to the discussion of temples and sculptures.  Do not click on the links describing the specifics of each Dynasty.

      This reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the Non-Commercial terms of use displayed on the website above.

  • 5.3 Art in Ancient Greece and Rome  
  • 5.3.1 Greece  
    • Web Media: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: “Ancient Greece”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: “Ancient Greece” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: This is an interactive resource.  Please look through the timeline of ancient Greece.  Click on the following links found within the timeline and read the corresponding essays: “Geometric Period,” “Archaic Period,” “Classical Period,” and “Hellenestic Period.”  Make sure to view the images that accompany these overviews by clicking on the “View Slide Show” option.

      This reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 5.3.2 Rome  
    • Web Media: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: “Italian Peninsula”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: “Italian Peninsula” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: This is an interactive resource.  Please look through the timeline of the Italian Peninsula.  Click on the following links found within the timeline and read the corresponding essays: “Etruscan Culture,” “Roman Republic,” and “Roman Empire.”  Make sure to view the images that accompany these overviews by clicking on the “View Slide Show” option.

      This reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 5.4 Art during the Middle Ages  
  • 5.4.1 Early Christian and Byzantine Art  
  • 5.4.2 Barbarian Art  
  • 5.4.3 Ottonian Art  
  • 5.4.4 Romanesque Art  
  • 5.4.5 Gothic Art  
  • 5.5 Art from the Renaissance to the Nineteenth Century  
  • 5.5.1 The Renaissance  
  • 5.5.2 Mannerism  
  • 5.5.3 Baroque and Rococo Art  
  • 5.5.4 Eighteenth-Century Art  
  • 5.5.5 Romanticism  
  • 5.6 Modern Art  
  • 5.6.1 Change in the Nineteenth Century  
  • 5.6.2 What is Modernism in Art?  
    • Reading: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Parme Giuntini’s “Becoming Modern”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Parme Giuntini’s “Becoming Modern” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read this article for an understanding of the forces that helped shape what we call “Modernism” as well as to get a sense for its characteristics.

      This reading should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

  • 5.6.3 Realism Versus Academic Art  
    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr Steven Zucker’s “Academic Art: Gérôme's Pygmalion and Galatea”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Academic Art: Gérôme's Pygmalion and Galatea” (QuickTime and HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please listen to the audio and read the accompanying article.  Understanding the artistic background of academic art will subsequently help you comprehend the break that modern artistic movements, such as realism, achieved.

      The listening and reading should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Reading: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Gersh-Nesic’s “Realism”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Gersh-Nesic’s “Realism” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read the article linked above to get a sense for why, how, and when Realism, as an artistic movement, emerged.

      This reading should take approximately 5 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Courbet’s Burial at Ornans”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Courbet’s Burial at Ornans” (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please watch this video, which discusses an important Realist work by Courbet: “Courbet’s Burial at Ornans.”

      This video will take approximately 7 minutes to watch.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Reading: SmartHistory.org’s “The Stonebreakers”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “The Stonebreakers” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read this article, which discusses Courbet’s “Stonebreakers” as well as the artist’s realism.  

      This reading should take approximately 5 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Manet’s Le Déjeuner Sur l’Herbe”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Manet’s Le Déjeuner Sur l’Herbe” (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please watch this video, which discusses an artwork by the historically most significant Realist painter painting after Courbet: Manet.

      This video will take approximately 7 minutes to watch.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris, Dr. Steven Zucker, and Dr. Beth Gersh-Nesic’s “Édouard Manet's Olympia”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris, Dr. Steven Zucker, and Dr. Beth Gersh-Nesic’s “Édouard Manet's Olympia” (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please watch the video linked above and read the associated article.  They discuss an important artwork by the Realist painter Manet.  Take notes on its “modern” characteristics as well as on the way it was received by its contemporary audience.

      This video will take approximately 14 minutes to watch.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

  • 5.6.4 Impressionism  
    • Reading: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Gersh-Nesic’s “Impressionism”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Gersh-Nesic’s “Impressionism” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read the article linked above.  It will introduce you to a movement that emerged after Realism: Impressionism.

      This reading should take approximately 10 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Monet’s Rouen Cathedral Series”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Monet’s Rouen Cathedral Series” (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please view the video linked above.  It discusses a series of paintings (made by artist Claude Monet) that are good representatives of the Impressionist movement as a whole.

      This video will take approximately 4 minutes to watch.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Renoir’s Moulin de la Galette”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Renoir’s Moulin de la Galette” (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please view the video linked above.  It discusses an Impressionist painting by artist Auguste Renoir.

      This video will take approximately 5 minutes to watch.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

  • 5.6.5 Post-Impressionism  
    • Reading: The ArtStory.org’s “Post-Impressionism”

      Link: The ArtStory.org’s “Post-Impressionism” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read this article to get a sense for what Post-Impressionism is.  Though “Post-Impressionism” is composed of many artistic styles, it is often defined by the way it reacted to, and often against, Impressionism.

      This reading should take approximately 20 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Post-Impressionsim, Seurat’s A Sunday on La Grande Jatte–1884”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Post-Impressionism, Seurat's a Sunday on La Grande Jatte–1884” (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please view the video linked above.  It discusses an artwork by Georges Seurat.  Take notes on the characteristics of the painting that can be considered reactions to Impressionism.

      This video will take approximately 11 minutes to watch
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Van Gogh’s Portrait of the Joseph Roulin”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Van Gogh’s Portrait of the Joseph Roulin” (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please view the video linked above.  It discusses an artwork by Post-Impressionist artist Vincent Van Gogh.  Take careful notes, especially on the subjects of structure and color.

      This video will take approximately 5 minutes to watch
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Cézanne's Still Life with Apples”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Cézanne's Still Life with Apples” (HTML, Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please view the video linked above and read the accompanying article.  They discuss an artwork by the Post-Impressionist painter Paul Cézanne.  Take notes on Cézanne’s relationship to older artistic traditions, how he at once reflected on visual traditions (including Impressionsim) and innovated through form.

      This reading and video should take approximately 10 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Gauguin’s Vision After the Sermon: Jacob Wrestling with the Angel”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Gauguin’s Vision After the Sermon: Jacob Wrestling with the Angel” (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please view the video linked above, which discusses artwork by Post-Impressionist painter Paul Gauguin.  According to speakers Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker, how is Gauguin’s use of color innovative?

      This video will take approximately 7 minutes to watch.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

  • 5.6.6 The Early Twentieth Century  
    • Reading: TheArtStory.org’s “Modern Art Movements: 1870 to Present”

      Link: TheArtStory.org’s “Modern Art Movements: 1870 to Present” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please go to the link above.  There are two timelines on the linked page.  Please look at the top timeline.  In this subunit, you will be learning about early twentieth century artistic movements.  Therefore, please click on the following movements within the timeline: “Fauvism,” “Expressionism,” “Futurism,” “Cubism,” “Suprematism,” “Dada,” “The Bauhaus,” “Constructivism,” and “Surrealism.”  Each time you click on the name of a movement, an “Overview” option will appear.  Read each overview.  In the top right corner of each page with an overview, there are examples of artworks under “Works of Art.”  View the artworks and read about them.  Below “Works of Art,” you will also find a section titled “Key Artists.”  Click on “Detail View” for each artist mentioned in the “Overview.”  Click on the thumbnail images in “Major Works” to get an idea for the style of the artworks and to view them on a bigger scale.

      This reading should take approximately 2 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon” (HTML, Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please go the webpage above and view the video.  It discusses an impactful artwork made by Pablo Picasso in the early twentieth century: Les Demoiselles d’Avignon.  Please also read the associated article.

      This reading and video should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

  • 5.6.7 World War II and Beyond  
    • Reading: TheArtStory.org’s “Modern Art Movements: 1870 to Present”

      Link: TheArtStory.org’s “Modern Art Movements: 1870 to Present” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please go to the link above.  There are two timelines on the linked page.  This time, look at the second timeline: “Movements: 1940 to 1980.”  In this subunit, you will be learning about artistic movements that developed after World War II.  Please click on all the movements within the timeline to proceed and read each “Overview” (each time you click on the name of a movement, an “Overview” option will appear).  In the top right corner of each page with an overview, there are examples of artworks under “Works of Art.”  View the artworks and read about them.  Below “Works of Art,” you will also find a section titled “Key Artists.”  Click on “Detail View” for each artist mentioned in the  “Overview.”  Click on the thumbnail images in “Major Works” to get an idea for the style of the artworks and to view them on a bigger scale.

      This reading should take approximately 2 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Web Media: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Abstract Expressionism, Pollock’s One: Number 31, 1950”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker’s “Abstract Expressionism, Pollock’s One: Number 31, 1950” (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Please go the webpage above and view the video, which discusses an artwork by the Abstract Expressionist artist Jackson Pollock.

      This video will take approximately 3 minutes to watch.
       
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Activity: The Saylor Foundation’s ARTH101: Guided Art Observations 5

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s ARTH101: Guided Art Observations 5 (PDF)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above to try your hand at identifying context when encountering a work of art.

      This activity should take approximately 1 hour to complete.

  • Unit 6: Art in Time and Place: A Few Non-Western Examples  

    While Western Art has traditionally been the object of study for Art Historians in the West, it is becoming more and more evident that a more global approach to the History of Art is of benefit to the discipline.  Accordingly, this unit will introduce you to the non-Western arts of Asia, Africa, and the Americas.

    Unit 6 Time Advisory   show close
    Unit 6 Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 6.1 Asian Arts  
  • 6.1.1 The Art of India  
  • 6.1.2 The Art of China  
    • Reading: The British Museum’s “Ancient China”

      Link: The British Museum’s “Ancient China” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read this short passage to get a sense for some of the broad cultural influences that helped shape ancient Chinese art.  Also, view the “Related Objects,” accessible by clicking on the thumbnail images in the upper right corner of the page.

      This reading should take approximately 5 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: The British Museum’s “Imperial China”

      Link: The British Museum’s “Imperial China” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please read this short passage to get a sense for some of the cultural and artistic developments that took place in the era of Imperial China.  Also, view the “Related Objects,” accessible by clicking on the thumbnail images in the upper right corner of the page.

      This reading should take approximately 5 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: The British Museum’s Online Tours: “Mountains and Water: Chinese Landscape Painting”

      Link: The British Museum’s The British Museum’s Online Tours: “Mountains and Water: Chinese Landscape Painting” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please work your way through the “Online Tour.”  Note that it contains 14 pages.  It will introduce you to an important genre of Chinese painting, landscape painting, as it developed through the centuries.

      This reading should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 6.1.3 The Art of Japan  
  • 6.2 The Islamic Middle East and Africa  
  • 6.2.1 The Islamic Middle East  
  • 6.2.2 Africa  
  • 6.3 The Americas  
  • 6.3.1 North America  
  • 6.3.2 South and Central America  
  • Final Exam  

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