Project Management

Purpose of Course  showclose

A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge defines project as “a temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result.  The temporary nature of projects indicates a definite beginning and end.  The end is reached when the project’s objectives have been achieved or when the project is terminated because its objectives will not or cannot be met, or when the need for the project no longer exists.” (PMBOK, 2008, p. 5).  The discipline of project management has various definitions.  Some describe it as a systematic method of planning and guiding a project from start to finish, while others have defined project management as a methodical approach of achieving targets and goals while optimizing the use of resources such as people, money, time, and space.  Some have referred to project management as the ability to be open and to elicit commitments through effective communication regarding how team members are willing to participate.  More specifically, the PMBOK (2008) defines project management as “the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project activities to meet the project requirements.” (p. 6).  Project management is therefore accomplished through the appropriate application and integration of systematic and logically grouped project management processes within five process groups including initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, as well as closing.  Thus, good project managers should be able to understand and effectively execute all project management processes for each unique project while communicating effectively within their own teams as well as with all stakeholders across the organizational network.  Project managers must also be artful at delegation, and they must understand that a cohesive team that works well together is critical to their success.  While many associate project management with military logistics, information technology, and construction, project management procedures are integrated in some aspect of most occupations.  Today, in addition to their normal duties, employees are often expected to take on additional assignments to get the job done on time and under budget.  This course will walk you through the nuts and bolts of project management.  From understanding the project life cycle to setting priorities and expectations to controlling expenses and reporting results, project management touches several resources within organizations.  You will examine roles and environments and various techniques of planning, evaluation, and control.   An overview of the tools used in contemporary project management will also be discussed throughout the course.

Course Information  showclose

Welcome to Business 402: Project Management Principles.  Below, please find some general information on the course and its requirements.

Course Designer: Dionne Mahaffey

Primary Resources: This course is composed of a range of different free, online materials.  However, the course makes primary use of the following resources:

Requirements for Completion: In order to complete this course, you will need to work through each unit and all of its assigned materials.  Pay special attention to Unit 1 as this lays the groundwork for understanding the more advanced, exploratory material presented in later units. You will also need to complete:

  • Unit 1 Assessment
  • Unit 1 Discussion Board
  • Unit 2 Activity
  • Unit 2 Discussion Board  
  • Unit 3 Activity
  • Unit 3 Discussion Board
  • Unit 4 Activities
  • Unit 4 Assessment
  • Unit 4 Discussion Board  
  • Unit 5 Assessment
  • Unit 5 Discussion Board
  • Unit 6 Activity
  • Unit 6 Assessment
  • Unit 6 Discussion Board
  • The Final Exam

Note that you will only receive an official grade on your final exam.  However, in order to adequately prepare for this exam, you will need to work through the assessments, activities, and discussion board assignments listed above.
In order to “pass” this course, you will need to earn a 70% or higher on the Final Exam.  Your score on the exam will be tabulated as soon as you complete it.  If you do not pass the exam, you may take it again.

Time Commitment: This course should take approximately 136.75 hours to complete. Each unit includes a “time advisory” that lists the amount of time you are expected to spend on each subunit.  These should help you plan your time accordingly.  It may be useful to take a look at these time advisories and to determine how much time you have over the next few weeks to complete each unit, and then to set goals for yourself.  For example, Unit 1 should take you 27.25 hours.  Perhaps you can sit down with your calendar and decide to complete subunit 1.1  (a total of 3.25 hours) on Monday night; subunits 1.2 and 1.3 (a total of 4.75 hours) on Tuesday night; subunit 1.4 (a total of 4.5 hours) on Wednesday night; etc. 

Tips/Suggestions: Please read through each unit carefully.  Then, read each resource and listen to the assigned lectures.  The assessments found in some subunits will help affirm your understanding of the course content.  Try to take comprehensive notes on each resource.  When taking notes, it may help to pay particular attention to the learning outcomes set out at the beginning of each unit.  Reviewing these notes will be useful as you prepare and study for your Final Exam.



Learning Outcomes  showclose

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  • Define the terms project and project management.
  • Describe the project life cycle, project selection, project environment, and approval process.
  • Identify the project management process groups including initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing.
  • Explain the role of the project manager in initiating and completing a project.
  • Explain knowledge areas including project integration management, project scope management, project time management, project cost management, project quality management, project human resource management, project communications management, project risk management, and project procurement management
  • Identify and apply the steps that must be taken to complete projects on time and on budget.
  • Identify and apply human-resources skills in forming and developing a team.
  • Describe how to organize the organizational structure for a project.
  • Identify tools and techniques for planning and tracking  a project.
  • Develop methods for motivating teams and keeping them focused.
  • Explain how to make leadership decisions concerning organizational structure and the role of project resources on a project’s team.
  • Identify project risks.
  • Explain global project management.

Course Requirements  showclose

In order to take this course, you must:

√    Have access to a computer.

√    Have continuous broadband Internet access.

√    Have the ability/permission to install plug-ins (e.g. Adobe Reader or Flash) and software.

√    Have the ability to download and save files and documents to a computer.

√    Have the ability to open and edit Microsoft Office files and documents (.doc, .docx, .ppt, .pptx, .xls, .xlsx, etc.).

√    Have competency in the English language.

√    Have read the Saylor Student Handbook.

Preliminary Information

Unit Outline show close


Expand All Resources Collapse All Resources
  • Unit 1: Project Management Defined  

    According to A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (2008), a project is “a temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result.”  The broader definition states that a project is “an endeavor that requires an organized set of work efforts that are planned in a level of detail that is progressively elaborated as more information is discovered.”  Projects should result in developing a new product or service, improving or modifying existing goods, services, and procedures.  The bringing together of skilled resources to create something new or different using effective management processes is the cornerstone of project management. In practice, project management is defined as “the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project activities to meet the project requirements” (PMBOK, 2008, p. 6). A project manager should be able to identify project requirements, address the various needs, concerns, and expectations of the stakeholders as the project is planned and carried out, and also to balance the competing project constraints in terms of project scope, quality, schedule, budget, resources and risk.

    In this unit, you will be given a foundation in project management through explorations of the history of the discipline, as well as a discussion of the contemporary frameworks used by organizations today. 

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 1.1 Introduction to Projects  
    • Reading: HRA Consulting: Michael Harding Roberts’ Project Management Book: “Chapter 1 - Introduction and Principles”

      Link: HRA Consulting: Michael Harding Roberts’ Project Management Book: “Chapter 1 - Introduction and Principles” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Click on the link above, select the title for Chapter 1 in the table of contents, and read the entire chapter, which provides introductory information on the discipline of project management.  Make sure to click on the “next” link at the bottom of the page in order to continue on to the second page of the chapter.    Please note that this reading also covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 1.1.1 and 1.2.1, including sub-subunits 1.1.2.1 through 1.1.2.4.

      You should spend approximately 30 minutes studying and reading this resource. 
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above. 

  • 1.1.1 What Is the Definition of “Project?”  
    • Reading: Connexions: Merrie Barron and Andrew Barron’s “What Is a Project?”

      Link: Connexions: Merrie Barron and Andrew Barron’s “What Is a Project?” (PDF)

      Instructions: Click on the link above, and read the entire module, which defines project. You may download the PDF or ePub version of this text by clicking on the appropriate link under “Download” at the bottom of the webpage.

      This reading should take approximately 15-20 minutes, which includes taking notes. 
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.  This book is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License and is an Open Educational Resource.

    • Lecture: YouTube: Rita Mulcahy’s “Getting Started in Project Management: An Introduction”

      Link: YouTube: Rita Mulcahy’s “Getting Started in Project Management: An Introduction” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Click on the link above to access the YouTube video, and view the brief lecture titled “Getting Started in Project Management.”  Please listen to this brief lecture to get an overview of project management. 

      Viewing the lecture and pausing to take notes should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: George Mason University: Professor Farrokh Alemi’s Lecture Notes on “Definition of Project Management and Goals of Project Management”

      Link: George Mason University: Professor Farrokh Alemi’s Lecture Notes on “Definition of Project Management and Goals of Project Management” (PowerPoint, Flash, or .swf)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and under the “Presentations” section, select the first link (“Slides”) for the “Definition of Project Management and Goals of Project Management.”  This lecture presents definitions and examples a project, project management, and a project manager.  Please note that the material is presented in several formats: audio narration, PowerPoint slides, and Adobe Flash presentations (.swf). 

      You should dedicate approximately 30 minutes to reading, taking notes, and studying these lecture slides.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: SlideShare: Craig Brown’s “What Is Project Management?”

      Link: SlideShare: Craig Brown’s “What Is Project Management?” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and navigate through the lecture slides by using the button at the bottom of each slide.  This presentation, titled “Project Management: 1. What Is Project Management,” includes 63 slides.  This lecture presents the definitions of project, process groups, the triple constraint, project management, the project manager, and project management framework that are closely in line with PMBOK (2008). This lecture also addresses the importance of project management and an integrated approach.

      Studying this lecture should take approximately 1.5 hours to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Liberty University: John Leighliter's “What Is a Project?”

      Link: iTunes U: Liberty University: John Leighliter's “What Is a Project?” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Click on the link above to access the iTunes U webpage for the Foundations of Project Management course at Liberty University.  Then, click on “View in iTunes” for the lecture titled “What Is a Project?”  Please listen to this brief 6-minute definition of the term project

      Taking notes and listening to the lecture should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.1.2 The Four Characteristics of a Project  
  • 1.1.2.1 Finite Time  

    Note: This topic is covered by the Roberts reading assigned below subunit 1.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the “Introduction and Principles” section of Roberts’ Project Management Book. 

  • 1.1.2.2 People Assigned  

    Note: This topic is covered by the Roberts reading assigned below subunit 1.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the “Introduction and Principles” section of Roberts’ Project Management Book.

  • 1.1.2.3 Clear Roles and Responsibilities  

    Note: This topic is covered by the Roberts reading assigned below subunit 1.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the “Introduction and Principles” section of Roberts’ Project Management Book.

  • 1.1.2.4 Deliverables  

    Note: This topic is covered by the Roberts reading assigned below subunit 1.1.  In particular, focus on the text below the “Introduction and Principles” section of Roberts’ Project Management Book.

  • 1.2 The Evolution of Project Management  
    • Reading: Connexions: Merrie Barron and Andrew Barron’s "History of Project Management”

      Link: Connexions: Merrie Barron and Andrew Barron’s “History of Project Management” (PDF)

      Instructions: Click on the link above, and read the article on the history of project management. You may download the PDF or ePub version of this text by clicking on the appropriate link under “Download” at the bottom of the webpage. 

      This reading should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.  This book is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License, and is an Open Educational Resource.

    • Lecture: George Mason University: Professor Farrokh Alemi’s Lecture Notes on “The History of Project Management”

      Link: George Mason University: Professor Farrokh Alemi’s Lecture Notes on “The History of Project Management” (PDF, PowerPoint, Flash, or .swf)

      Instructions: This lecture reviews evolution of the project management field.  Please click on the “More” link in the “Assigned Reading” section after the second reading titled Weaver’s “The Origins of Modern Project Management” to download the PDF.  Read the entire text (21 pages).  Then, scroll down to the section titled “Presentations,” and click on the link for the two lectures titled:  “History of Project Management before 1950s” and “History of Project Management after the 1950s.”  Please note that the material is presented in several formats: audio narration, PowerPoint slides, and Adobe Flash presentations (.swf). 

      You should spend approximately 1.5 hours reading, taking notes, and studying these lectures.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.3 Operations vs. Project Management  
  • 1.4 Project Management Overview  
  • 1.4.1 Project Management Defined  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 1.4.   In particular, make sure to read and review Section 1.1 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Pay attention to the definition of project management that opens the reading and note any vocabulary or terms highlighted in bold.

  • 1.4.2 Project Defined  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 1.4.  In particular, make sure to read and review Section 1.2 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex.  Make sure to take notes on the two main characteristics of a project, outlined in the beginning of the reading.

  • 1.4.3 Project Context  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 1.4.  In particular, make sure to read and review Section 1.3 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Take note of the terms in bold as key vocabulary and concepts. 

  • 1.4.4 Key Skills of the Project Manager  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 1.4.  In particular, make sure to read and review Section 1.4 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex.  Note the similarities and differences between operations management skills and project management skills.

  • 1.4.5 Project Management Knowledge Areas  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 1.4.  In particular, make sure to read and review Section 1.5 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex.  Read the text below each subheading carefully to better understand project management knowledge areas that are set out by the Project Management Institute. 

  • 1.5 Project Leadership Skills & Roles  
  • 1.6 Profiling a Project  
    • Lecture: YouTube: National Programme on Technology Enhanced Learning: Arun Kanda’s “Project Appraisal: Part One”

      Links:  YouTube: National Programme on Technology Enhanced Learning: Arun Kanda’s “Project Appraisal: Part One” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and watch the video (Part One) on project appraisal.  This lecture covers how to appraise the project effectiveness, how to choose the right project, and how to prepare a project feasibility report.  In developing a project feasibility report, you have to consider whether the project is worthwhile by evaluating many factors such as economic, financial, technical etc.  This lecture will go through the process of project identification, appraisal, and selection.  You will learn how to calculate Net Present Value (NPV), Internal Rate of Return (IRR), Payback Period, Loan Return Capability, and so on.  This video will improve your understanding of how to successfully create an initial assessment of a project’s viability. 

      Viewing this lecture and pausing to take notes should take approximately 1.25 hours to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: YouTube: National Programme on Technology Enhanced Learning: “Project Appraisal: Part Two”

      Link:  YouTube: National Programme on Technology Enhanced Learning:  “Project Appraisal: Part Two” (YouTube)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and watch the entire video (Part Two) on project appraisal. This lecture covers financial appraisal of projects (e.g. estimation of the cost of the project and its timing; estimation of the likely revenues during each period; the cost of capital; the planning horizon of the project; the risk in the project as evidenced by the worst and best values of costs and revenues; benefit/cost ratio of discounted cash flows; debt service coverage ratio; and a company’s reputation in terms of assets, liabilities, and record of previous repayments, etc.). This video will improve your understanding of how to successfully create an initial assessment of a project’s viability. 

      Viewing this video and pausing to take notes should take approximately 1.5 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: Project Management: from Simple to Complex: “Chapter 2: Project Profiling”

      Link: Project Management: from Simple to Complex: “Chapter 2: Project Profiling” (PDF)
       
      Instructions: Click on the link above to access the textbook, Project Management: from Simple to Complex.  Read Chapter 2 in its entirety.  Click on the links in the table of contents to access sections 2.1 through 2.4 of this chapter.  This reading will provide you with an overview of how to create a snapshot of the project in an effort to create an outline of the tasks involved in the project endeavor.  Attempt the exercises at the end of each section.  Please note that these readings cover the topics outlined in sub-subunits 1.6.1 through 1.6.4. 

      You should spend approximately 2 hours with this resource.
       
      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

  • 1.6.1 Using a Project Profile  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 1.6. Please make sure to read and review Section 2.1 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Make sure to note the definition of the bolded word project profiling in the reading.

  • 1.6.2 Project Profiling Models  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 1.6. Please make sure to read and review Section 2.2 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Make sure you understand the different dimensions of typology, Shenhar and Dvir’s observations, and Youker’s identification of project attributes.

  • 1.6.3 Complex Systems  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 1.6.  Please make sure to read and review Section 2.3 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Make sure you understand the characteristics of complex systems as outlined by this reading.

  • 1.6.4 Complexity Index Structure  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 1.6.  Please make sure to read and review Section 2.4 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. This section will further explain the Complexity Index, which was introduced in the Section 2.3 reading.

  • 1.7 Project Management Success or Failure  
  • 1.7.1 Defining Risk  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 1.7.  Make sure to read and review Section 11.1 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Note the definitions and characteristics of risk, project risk, and risk management.

  • 1.7.2 Risk Management Process  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 1.7.  Make sure to read and review Section 11.2 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Read the text under each subheading carefully; pay attention to Figure 11.2, which provides a visual of risk and impact.

  • 1.7.3 Project Risk by Phases  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 1.7.  Make sure to read and review Section 11.3 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Make sure you understand risk associated with each phase of a project: initiation phase, planning phase, execution phase, and closeout phase.

  • 1.8 Discussion Board  
    • Activity: The Saylor Foundation’s “BUS402: Unit 1 Discussion Questions”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “BUS402: Unit 1 Discussion Questions” (HTML)

      Instructions: Consider responding to the following questions by posting your response on the course discussion board for BUS402. You may also respond to other students’ posts.

      1. According to PMBOK (2008), what is a project? What is project management?

      2. What is your experience as a project manager? What key skills should a successful project manager have?

      3. What factors do you need to consider when you start to prepare a project feasibility report? Please describe key factors and provide a few examples for each.

      This activity should take approximately 3 hours to complete. 

    • Assessment: ProProf’s “Pre-Assessment Quiz on Project Management Fundamentals”

      Link: ProProf’s “Pre-Assessment Quiz on Project Management Fundamentals” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and complete the assessment to the best of your ability.  This is a pre-assessment quiz to help you determine how much you already know about project management.  To begin the test, enter “Tester” in the name field, and then click start.  You do not have to enter your real name. 

      You should spend approximately 1 hour on this assessment.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Unit 2: Project Life Cycle  

    Every project has a life cycle, or a series of milestones and accomplishments that must be met throughout the project.  The first stage of the project management life cycle (PML) is initiation.  In this stage, the project is chartered and mission statements as well as the project’s overall goals are defined.  The project manager is identified and the team is assembled.  In this stage, some organizations draft a mission statement just for the project. 

    The next phase is the planning phase.  During this second phase, tasks are assigned and details are provided to describe each task.  Project deliverables are also identified.  In phase three, prototypes are developed, the project is tested, quality is reviewed, and production is initiated.  This is called the execution phase.  It is also referred to as the control or implementation phase. 

    The last phase of a project is closure. Reviews are held when the project is complete. During this last phase, one has the opportunity to review lessons learned and to archive data and records.   Customer feedback is sought regarding the life cycle and delivery of the system.  In this unit, you will learn that projects should follow a systematic approach with a defined beginning and ending. 

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 2.1 What Is a Project Life Cycle?  
  • 2.1.1 Project Phases  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 2.1.  In particular, pay attention to Section 3.1 in Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Take notes on what happens during each project phase: initiation phase, planning phase, execution phase, and closeout phase.  Note that the resources for subunits 2.2 through 2.4 go more in-depth into each phase.

  • 2.1.2 Project Organization  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 2.1.  In particular, read and review Section 3.2 in Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Pay attention to the figures that represent visuals of project organization in this section.

  • 2.1.3 Measuring Organizational Complexity  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 2.1.  In particular, read and review section 3.3 in Project Management: from Simple to Complex. In this section, you will analyze a project function based on the Complexity Index, as well as assign a complexity score to the project.

  • 2.2 Initiation Phase  
    • Reading: Connexions: Merrie Barron and Andrew Barron’s “Project Initiation”

      Link: Connexions: Merrie Barron and Andrew Barron’s “Project Initiation” (PDF)
       
      Instructions: Click on the link above, and read the entire article, which discusses the first phase of the project management lifecycle. You may download the PDF or ePub version of this text by clicking on the appropriate link under “Download” at the bottom of the webpage.

      This reading should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.  This book is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License, and is an Open Educational Resource.

    • Lecture: George Mason University: Professor Farrokh Alemi’s Lecture Notes on “Project Initiation and Planning”

      Link: George Mason University: Professor Farrokh Alemi’s Lecture Notes on “Project Initiation and Planning” (PowerPoint, Flash, YouTube, or .swf)
       
      Instructions: This lecture reviews the first phase of the project management lifecycle.  Scroll down to the section titled “Presentations,” and click on the link for the preferred format for the lecture on project initiation.  Please note that the material is presented in several formats: audio narration, PowerPoint slides, .swf, and YouTube video. 

      You should spend approximately 15 minutes studying  this lecture.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.3 Planning Phase  
    • Lecture: YouTube: Rita Mulcahy’s “Getting Started in Project Management: 3. Project Plan”

      Link: YouTube: Rita Mulcahy’s “Getting Started in Project Management: 3. Project Plan” (YouTube)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view this entire video lecture, which covers the project management plan, why planning, mistakes, the planning process, and benefits of planning which indicate that project management is an art of science.  

      Viewing this lecture and pausing to take notes will take approximately 15 minutes to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: SlideShare: Craig Brown’s “Project Management Plans”

      Link: SlideShare: Craig Brown’s “Project Management Plans” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and study these lecture slides, using the arrow buttons at the bottom of each slide to navigate through all 87 slides.  This lecture covers the project management plan, benefits of planning, what to consider in your plan, guidelines, and suggestions on reviewing a plan.  The contents are closely in line with PMBOK (2008).  
       
      Studying these lecture notes should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: Connexions: Merrie Barron and Andrew Barron’s “Project Planning”

      Link: Connexions: Merrie Barron and Andrew Barron’s “Project Planning” (PDF)
       
      Instructions: Click on the link above, and read the entire module, which discusses the first phase of the project management lifecycle. You may download the PDF or ePub version of this text by clicking on the appropriate link under “Download” at the bottom of the webpage.

      This reading should take approximately 2 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.  This book is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License, and is an Open Educational Resource.

    • Reading: Nick Jenkins’s A Project Management Primer: “Planning”

      Link: Nick Jenkins’s A Project Management Primer: “Planning” (PDF)
       
      Instructions: Click on the link above to download the PDF file, and read the entire section on “Planning” on pages 23–34.  This section discusses the planning stage of the life cycle including budgeting, allocating resources,  scheduling, and creating the project plan. 

      This reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License, and is attributed to Nick Jenkins.

    • Lecture: George Mason University: Professor Farrokh Alemi’s Lecture Notes on “Project Initiation and Planning”

      Link: George Mason University: Professor Farrokh Alemi’s Lecture Notes on “Project Initiation and Planning” (PowerPoint, Flash, YouTube, or .swf)
       
      Instructions: This lecture reviews the second phase of the project management lifecycle.  Scroll down to the section titled “Presentations,” and click on the link for the preferred format for the lecture on project planning.  Please note that the material is presented in several formats: audio narration, PowerPoint slides, .swf, and YouTube video. 

      You should spend approximately 15 minutes viewing and taking notes on this lecture.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: HRA Consulting: Michael Harding Roberts’ Project Management Book: “Chapter 7 - Planning”

      Link: HRA Consulting: Michael Harding Roberts’ Project Management Book: “Chapter 7 - Planning” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Click on the link above, then select the link to “Chapter 7,” and read the contents of this chapter, which reviews the planning and scheduling aspect of project management.  Note that this chapter is 7 pages, and you will need to click on “next” at the end of the text on each webpage to continue on to subsequent pages of the chapter.  

      You should spend approximately 2 hours studying this resource.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.  

    • Lecture: YouTube: Palaestratraining.com’s “Scope Planning”

      Link: YouTube: Palaestratraining.com’s “Scope Planning” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view this entire video lecture, which covers scope planning including collecting requirements, defining scope, and creating work breakdown structure (WBS), which are closely in line with PMBOK 4th edition (2008).  

      Viewing this video and pausing to take notes should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.4 Execution Phase  
  • 2.5 Closure Phase  
  • 2.5.1 End of Project Stages  

    Note: This topic is covered by the HRA Consulting reading assigned below subunit 2.5.  In particular, please focus on the text from under the heading “At the End of Each Project Stage” on pages 1 - 4 of Chapter 13.

  • 2.5.2 End of the Benefit Assessment Period  

    Note: This topic is covered by the HRA Consulting reading assigned below subunit 2.5.  In particular, please focus on the text below the heading “At the end of the Benefit Assessment Period” on page 5 of Chapter 13. 

  • 2.6 Project Success vs. Failure  
  • 2.7 Discussion Board  
    • Activity: The Saylor Foundation’s “BUS402: Unit 2 Discussion Questions”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “BUS402: Unit 2 Discussion Questions” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Consider responding to the following questions by posting your response on the course discussion board for BUS402. You may also respond to other students’ posts.

      1.  What is a project life cycle? Please describe each project phase with one example.

      2.  Have you experienced any project failure as a project manager? If so, what lessons have you learned? If not, what successful experiences would you like to share? If you haven’t had any project management experience, please answer this question based on the course content so far.

      3.  According to subunit 2.6, what key project management processes and knowledge areas are covered in PMBOK (2008)? How do they represent your real-world project management experiences?   

      4.  As a project manager, what techniques, tools, or strategies can you use to effectively manage project risks?  


      This activity should take approximately 3 hours to complete. 

    • Activity: Dijest: Phil Wolff’s “Project Initiation Checklist”

      Link: Dijest: Phil Wolff’s “Project Initiation Checklist” (HTML)

      Instructions: Project initiation was discussed above in subunit 2.2.  Based on what you have learned, please complete the “Project Initiation Checklist.”  Try to base the information on a project that you are working on currently, or choose a fictitious project for the purposes of this activity.  

      You should dedicate approximately 1 hour to this activity.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Unit 3: Organizational Design  

    Many businesses have struggled with organizing projects under a separate organizational system than their ongoing operations.  Upon the chartering of a project, organizations must determine how their project will be implemented.  In many cases, traditional organization designs fall short of providing the type of structure needed for successful project implementation.  Thus, the manner in which a project is organized may change with each new charter through a temporary design project which fits the current project’s needs.  

    There are various project management systems that provide the proper framework for implementing project activities within organizations.  This unit will discuss how project managers can balance the needs of both the overall organization and the project by utilizing effective design techniques.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 3.1 Establishing the Proper Organizational Structure  
  • 3.2 Working with Individuals  
  • 3.3 Working with Groups  
  • 3.4 Communication Tactics  
    • Reading: Project Management: from Simple to Complex: “Chapter 6: Communication Technologies”

      Link: Project Management: from Simple to Complex: “Chapter 6: Communication Technologies” (PDF)
       
      Instructions: Click on the link above to access Project Management: from Simple to Complex textbook.  Then, click on the link to “Chapter 6” for an introduction to communication technologies.  Also, in the table of contents, click on the links to and read sections 6.1 and 6.2.  Attempt the exercises at the end of these readings.  This chapter discusses how communication technology can facilitate faster and better communication among project team members.  These readings cover the topics outlined in sub-subunits 3.4.1 and 3.4.2. 

      You should dedicate approximately 2 hours to these readings and exercises.
       
      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

    • Reading: The Open University’s “Effective Communication”

      Link: The Open University’s “Effective Communication” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Click on the link above, and read about why it is essential that project managers communicate effectively.  

      You should spend approximately 15 minutes studying and reading this resource.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.  This material is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 License, and is attributed to The Open University.

    • Lecture: George Mason University: Professor Farrokh Alemi’s Lecture Notes on “Project Teamwork”

      Link: George Mason University: Professor Farrokh Alemi’s Lecture Notes on “Project Teamwork” (PowerPoint, Flash, YouTube, or .swf)
       
      Instructions: This lecture reviews how to create productive project teams.  It also shows how to organize project communications.  Scroll down to the section titled “Presentations,” and click on the link for the lectures titled, “Part One of Lecture on Communication Planning” and “Part Two of Lecture on Communication Planning.”  Please note that the material is presented in several formats: audio narration, PowerPoint slides, .swf, and YouTube videos. 

      You should spend approximately 2 hours reading, taking notes, and viewing these lectures.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.4.1 Types of Communication  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 3.4.  In particular, please focus on Section 6.1 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Try to note the similarities and differences of synchronous and asynchronous communication.

  • 3.4.2 Selecting Software  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 3.4.  In particular, please focus on Section 6.2 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex.  Make sure to pay attention to the several figures in this section of the reading that provide visuals of the features of various types of software (Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, etc.). 

  • 3.5 Conflict Resolution  
  • 3.6 Discussion Board  
    • Activity: The Saylor Foundation’s “BUS402: Unit 3 Discussion Questions”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “BUS402: Unit 3 Discussion Questions” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Consider responding to the following questions by posting your response on the course discussion board for BUS402. You may also respond to other students’ posts.
       
      1. What characteristics should an effective project team have?  

      2. As a project manager, what challenges may you experience when you manage your team?

      3. When conflicts occur in your project, what strategies would be helpful for you to manage project conflicts?

       
      This activity should take approximately 3 hours to complete. 

    • Assessment: Ex-designz’s “Project Management Quiz”

      Link: Ex-designz’s “Project Management Quiz” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Take this short quiz, which covers the information presented in this course so far.  This is an open book quiz, so you can use the resources while taking the assessment. 

      The review of this section and this quiz should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above. 

  • Unit 4: Project Initiation and Planning  

    Project initiation is the most critical phase in the project life cycle, as it is the first phase of the overall initiative. During this phase, the scope is defined and the team and other resources are positioned.  The organization defines the objectives, purpose, and mission of the project as well as determines the deliverables and expected outcomes.  The project manager is responsible for creating the baseline project plan.  In this unit, you will learn about the project charter and the various frameworks and tools that can be utilized in this phase to create the proper foundation for project success. 

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 4.1 Project Selection  
  • 4.1.1 Project Charter Defined  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 4.1.  Please focus on the text and various parts of a project charter under the heading “What Is a Project Charter?”

  • 4.1.2 Example of a Project Charter  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 4.1.  Please focus on the text below the heading “Sample Project Charter.”

  • 4.2 Project Scope and Baseline  
  • 4.3 Project Planning Tools  
    • Reading: Project Management: from Simple to Complex: “Chapter 8: Project Scheduling Software”

      Link: Project Management: from Simple to Complex: “Chapter 8: Project Scheduling Software” (PDF)
       
      Instructions: Click on the link above to access the text, Project Management: from Simple to Complex.  Then, click on the links to Chapter 8 and sections 8.1 through 8.5 in the table of contents.  Read the chapter introduction and each section in its entirety, making sure to attempt the exercises at the end of each section.  This chapter discusses the scheduling aspect of project management and introduces technology and tools that will help project managers stay on track.  While this text uses information technology projects as examples, the principles are the same for the management of any type of complex project and activity.  Please note that these readings cover the topics outlined in sub-subunits 4.3.1 through 4.3.5. 

      You should dedicate approximately 2 hours to this reading and exercises.
       
      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

    • Lecture: YouTube: National Programme on Technology Enhanced Learning: Arun Kanda’s “Computers in Project Management”

      Link: YouTube: National Programme on Technology Enhanced Learning:  Arun Kanda’s “Computers in Project Management” (YouTube)
       
      Instructions: Watch the entire video, which presents various technology tools that aide in effective project management.  

      Viewing this video and pausing to take notes should take approximately 1.5 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: George Mason University: Professor Farrokh Alemi’s Lecture Notes on “Critical Path Method”

      Link: George Mason University: Professor Farrokh Alemi’s Lecture Notes on “Critical Path Method” (PowerPoint, Flash, YouTube, or .swf)
       
      Instructions: This lecture reviews the critical path method.  Project management software generally calculates the critical path, so you do not necessarily need to do so by hand.  Scroll down to the section titled “Presentations,” and click on the link for the preferred format for the lecture titled, “Lecture on Critical Path Method.”  Please note that the material is presented in several formats: audio narration, PowerPoint slides, .swf, and YouTube video.   Note that some of these links, such as for YouTube, provide the lecture in two parts. 

      You should spend 30 minutes studying this lecture.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.3.1 Types of Schedules  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 4.3.  In particular, please focus on Section 8.1 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex.  Please make note of the 3 different types of schedules: conceptual, master, and detail.

  • 4.3.2 Elements of Time Management  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 4.3.  Focus on Section 8.2 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Take careful notes on each element of time management: define activities, sequence activities, estimate activity resources, estimate activity duration, develop a schedule, and control the schedule. 

  • 4.3.3 Critical Path and Float  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 4.3.  In particular, please review Section 8.3 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Note the definition of critical path at the outset of the reading and pay attention to Figure 8.15 for a visual representation of critical path. Also, note the definition of float, total float, and free float under the heading “Float.” 

  • 4.3.4 Managing the Schedule  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 4.3.  Focus on Section 8.4 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Note the bolded subheadings in the reading as steps to track and manage a schedule as well as to accelerate a schedule.

  • 4.3.5 Project Scheduling Software  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 4.3. In particular, please focus on Section 8.5 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. This section will help you identify project software choices in comparison to the complexity of a project. 

  • 4.4 Discussion Board  
    • Activity: The Saylor Foundation’s “BUS402: Unit 4 Discussion Questions”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “BUS402: Unit 4 Discussion Questions” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Consider responding to the following questions by posting your response on the course discussion board for BUS402. You may also respond to other students’ posts.

      1.  What is a project charter? Based on the project charter, what are your responsibilities as a project manager?

      2.  What is WBS? Why is the WBS necessary for project planning?   

      3.  What are key lessons you have learned from the “Project Management Best Practices” lecture in subunit 4.2?

      4.  What techniques can you use to identify the critical path and a float in a project?   

       
      This activity should take approximately 3 hours to complete. 

    • Activity: George Mason University: Professor Farrokh Alemi’s Lecture Notes on “Critical Analysis: Rapid Analysis”

      Link: George Mason University: Professor Farrokh Alemi’s Lecture Notes on “Critical Path Method: Rapid Analysis” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Based on the lecture and readings, please click on the link above and scroll down to “Rapid Analysis.”  Review the illustrations and charts, and complete the questions in this section. 

      You should spend approximately 1.5 hours on this activity.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Activity: Connexions: Merrie Barron and Andrew Barron’s “An Example of a Project Charter”

      Link: Connexions: Merrie Barron and Andrew Barron’s “An Example of a Project Charter” (PDF)
       
      Instructions: Using the same project that you used for the activity in Unit 2, create a sample project charter using the template found at the link above. You may download the PDF or ePub version of this text by clicking on the appropriate link under “Download” at the bottom of the webpage.

      You should spend 1 hour reviewing the material and completing this activity.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.  This book is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License, and is an Open Educational Resource.

    • Assessment: Knowledge Century’s “Project Management Quiz”

      Link: Knowledge Century’s “Project Management Quiz” (HTML)

      Instructions: Take this short quiz, which addresses the information we have covered in this course thus far.  This is an open book quiz, so you can use the resources while taking the assessment. 

      You should spend approximately 1 hour doing any necessary review of material in this unit and completing this assessment.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.  

  • Unit 5: Project Execution  

    Execution involves building the deliverables and controlling the project scope and costs.  Risks must also be managed during this phase.  Control mechanisms should be in place to control issues and problems as well as to ensure quality.  Once the project initiation and planning is complete, the execution phase begins.  Ideally the project plan has been approved and base-lined so that the actual work can start.

    This phase includes the coordination of resources to perform the activities outlined in the plan.  The project manager must unify all associated areas of the project and engage all stakeholders, project staff, customers, and other resources to achieve a successful outcome.  Report gathering is performed regularly during this phase to analyze ongoing status, task changes, and other variances to the plan.  Administratively, the project manager must complete or coordinate all status reports to keep the organization abreast of project standing.  The majority of the project’s tasks are performed during this phase. 

    In this unit, you will learn the core of project management through a review of the organizational techniques required to make sure deliverables are completed on time and on budget. 

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 5.1 Project Control and Reporting  
  • 5.2 Project Quality  
    • Reading: Project Management: from Simple to Complex: “Chapter 10: Managing Project Quality”

      Link: Project Management: from Simple to Complex: “Chapter 10: Managing Project Quality” (PDF)
       
      Instructions: Click on the link above to access Project Management: from Simple to Complex textbook.  Make sure to read the chapter introduction, and then click on the links to sections 10.1 through 10.5 in the table of contents.  Attempt the exercises at the end of each section.  This chapter provides an overview of quality assurance and quality control.  While this text uses information technology projects as examples, the principles are the same for the management of any type of complex project and activity.  These readings cover the topics outlined in sub-subunits 5.2.1 through 5.2.5. 

      You should dedicate approximately 3 hours to completing these readings and exercises.
       
      Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

    • Reading: HRA Consulting: Michael Harding Roberts’ Project Management Book: “Chapter 12 – Quality Management”

      Link: HRA Consulting: Michael Harding Roberts’ Project Management Book: “Chapter 12 – Quality Management” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Click on the link above, select the title for Chapter 12, and read the contents of this chapter, which reviews how to meet customer requirements through the management of quality.  Make sure to click on the “next” link at the bottom of each page to continue on to subsequent webpages.  The chapter is 8 pages total. 

      You should dedicate approximately 2 hours to studying this reading.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above. 

  • 5.2.1 Quality and Statistics  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 5.2.  In particular, pay attention to Section 10.1 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Note the definitions of quality, grade, and statistics terminology in this reading.

  • 5.2.2 Quality as a Competitive Advantage  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 5.2.  Focus on Section 10.2 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex, which provides a history of the evolution of quality as an important competitive advantage.

  • 5.2.3 Relevance of Quality to Project Management  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 5.2.  Please review Section 10.3 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Make sure you note the similarities and differences between process quality management and project quality management.

  • 5.2.4 Planning and Controlling Quality  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 5.2.  In particular, see Section 10.4 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. This section will introduce you to statistic measurement terminology as well as other tips and techniques for planning and controlling quality.

  • 5.2.5 Quality Assurance  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 5.2. Focus on Section 10.5 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. Take notes on process analysis and the quality audit for a better understanding of the methods used to assure quality.

    • Lecture: SlideShare: Yodhia Antariksa’s “Six Sigma for Managers”

      Link: SlideShare: Yodhia Antariksa’s “Six Sigma for Managers” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and study the “Six Sigma for Managers” lecture slides, which discuss an overview of Six Sigma, including what Six Sigma is as well as the tools and key roles for Six Sigma.

      You should dedicate approximately 3 hours to studying these slides, learning about how to use this software, and practicing with the free trial of the software. 
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 5.3 Managing Risks  
  • 5.3.1 Managing Project Risk  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 5.3.  Focus on the Chapter 11 introduction in Project Management: from Simple to Complex for a review of managing project risk.

  • 5.3.2 Project Risk and the Project Complexity Profile  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 5.3. Focus on Section 11.4 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. In this section, you will learn about the relationship between project risk and the types of complexities: external, internal, technological, and environmental.

  • 5.4 Discussion Board  
    • Activity: The Saylor Foundation’s “BUS402: Unit 5 Discussion Questions”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “BUS402: Unit 5 Discussion Questions” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Consider responding to the following questions by posting your response on the course discussion board for BUS402. You may also respond to other students’ posts.

      1. From Unit 5, what is most useful technique/tool you have learned to control project quality, and why?

      2. In your opinion, what are top three risks for managing a large project? Please give a few examples for each identified risk.

      3. What is Six Sigma? How does the Six Sigma relate to project management practices?

       
      This activity should take approximately 3 hours to complete. 

    • Assessment: FreePMP’s “Sample Exam”

      Link: FreePMP’s “Sample Exam” (Adobe Flash)
       
      Instructions: Review the introductory information on how to take the sample quiz with the slides provided.  Then, complete the entire assessment, which covers the information taught in the course thus far.  This is an open book quiz, so you can use the resources while taking the assessment. 

      This assessment should take 1 hour to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.  The owner authorizes that the link to this exam can be shared.  Please do not copy the questions of this exam. 

  • Unit 6: Project Implementation and Closure  

    The final phase of the project life cycle is the implementation and closure phase. This includes winding down tasks, implementing the product or service to the client or internally within the organization, releasing staff and conducting a lessons-learned review.  This phase is very crucial to preventing the project from moving beyond the original scope and budget as defined in the baseline project plan.  There must be acceptance of the project deliverables and feedback must be sought regarding project performance.  Evaluation reports must also be created and lessons-learned, or post-mortem meeting must be held to discuss project strengths and weaknesses.  Outstanding contributors are also recognized during this phase and the achievements of the overall project team are celebrated.

    This unit will review how to close down projects and use the insights gained to make improvements going forward; it will also discuss how to celebrate the team for peak-performance and how to seek and obtain customer feedback and acceptance.

    Time Advisory   show close
    Learning Outcomes   show close
  • 6.1 Project Implementation  
  • 6.2 Acceptance of Deliverables and Client Approval  
  • 6.2.1 Including the Client  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 6.2.  Focus on Section 4.1 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. This section will provide information on when and how to incorporate a client into a project as well as the benefits and disadvantages of doing so.

  • 6.2.2 Understanding Values and Expectations  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 6.2.  In particular, review Section 4.2 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. This section will provide advice on dealing with clients, figuring out client expectations, and clarifying values.

  • 6.2.3 Dealing with Problems  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 6.2.  Please review Section 4.3 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. This section will provide advice on standard procedures for dealing with issues and revising decisions.

  • 6.2.4 Nurturing a Feeling of Satisfaction  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 6.2.  In particular, focus on Section 4.4 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex to learn about the importance of project milestones and how to involve the client in on these successes.

  • 6.3 Project Procurement and Closure  
  • 6.3.1 External Resources  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 6.3.  In particular, review Section 12.1 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. This section uses an example of a New York construction company to help you better understand when outsourcing might be beneficial.

  • 6.3.2 Procurement Plan  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 6.3. Please focus on Section 12.2 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. The focus will be on the importance of the procurement process to the closure strategy. Note the specific roles of vendors, suppliers, and partners.

  • 6.3.3 Contracts  

    Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 6.3. Focus on Section 12.3 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. This section will provide advice on selecting a type of contract.

  • 6.3.4 Procurement Process  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 6.3.  In particular, review Section 12.4 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex. The focus will be on the importance of the procurement process to the closure strategy.

  • 6.3.5 Global Project Management  

    In addition to the need for understanding different types of contract in a domestic environment, in reality, many of today’s projects are global, so it is necessary to know the complexity of running a global project.

    • Lecture: SlideShare: Craig Brown’s “Global Project Management”

      Link: SlideShare: Craig Brown’s “Global Project Management” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please click on the link above, and study these lectures notes, using the arrow key at the bottom of each slide to navigate through the whole lecture (118 slides total).  This lecture discusses how to pursue project partnering and points out key practices in partnerships.  It also covers different types of contracts and contract changes. At a global level, as a project manager, you need to be aware of challenges of managing international projects/assignments, which expose you to international environmental, cross cultural issues, and so on.  

      Studying this lecture should take approximately 4 hours to complete.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 6.3.6 Project Closure  

    Note: This topic is covered by the resource assigned below subunit 6.3.  Make sure to review Section 12.5 of Project Management: from Simple to Complex.The focus will be on the closure strategy.

  • 6.4 Discussion Board  
    • Activity: The Saylor Foundation’s “BUS402: Unit 6 Discussion Questions”

      Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “BUS402: Unit 6 Discussion Questions” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: Consider responding to the following questions by posting your response on the course discussion board for BUS402. You may also respond to other students’ posts.

      1.  In general, what types of project contracts exist? What are differences among them? As a project manager, what would be your most favorite contract to manage? Why?

      2.  How can you handle changes requested by your clients after the project deliverables have been officially accepted?  

      3.  Assume you are assigned to an international project, what kind of potential issues or challenges do you need to be aware of when you start to plan the project?


      This activity should take approximately 3 hours to complete. 

  • 6.5 Course Wrap-Up  

    After completing all six units for this project management course, you should be able to define the terms project and project management; explain the role of the project manager during the project life cycle; identify human resource skills for forming and developing teams; balance project time, budget, and resource constraints; and apply project management tools and techniques for managing a project.  More specifically, you should be capable of explaining what 5 key project management process groups are and what 9 key project management knowledge areas are.  You should also be able to discuss what makes a project successful and what risks projects may have during the whole project life cycle.  In today’s global world, you also should be able to explain main challenges of managing global projects.  

    • Lecture: SlideShare: Robsonnasc’s “Project Management Professional (PMP) Certification Study Guide”

      Link: SlideShare: Robsonnasc’s “Project Management Professional (PMP) Certification Study Guide” (HTML)
       

      Instructions: If you plan to take a Project Management Professional (PMP) Certificate Exam, please be aware of the key contents covered by PMBOK (2008), as this study guide lecture points out. Click on the link above, and study these lecture notes, using the arrow button at the bottom of each slide to navigate through the whole lecture (284 slides total). This lecture highlights all key PM processes and knowledge areas that are expected to be covered in your PMP certificate exam based on PMBOK (2008). 
       
      You should spend approximately 3 hours viewing and taking notes on this lecture.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Activity: Project Manager’s Tool Bag: Ken Owttrim’s “Sample Project Tutorial”

      Link: Project Manager’s Tool Bag: Ken Owttrim’s “Sample Project Tutorial” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: The following hypothetical company scenario is used as the basis for completing the sample project management template documents.  "The XYZ Manufacturing Company is an established firm in the computer industry.  They manufacture systems across two divisions; the PC / Server Division and the Monitor / Display Division.  They engineer their products from the ground up, purchase the necessary components, and assemble and test the final products in house.  They have recently embarked on an internal manufacturing system upgrade.  They have purchased a software application from a local vendor and are in the early phase of implementation."    
       
      Review the Sample Documents that you have been provided with, and then create your own documents from scratch to help demonstrate mastery of the concepts reviewed.

      Project Charter

      Project Meeting – Agenda

      Project Meeting – Minutes

      Project Action Items – Open

      Project Action Items – Closed

      Project Issue Management Form

      Project Issue Management Log

      Project Weekly Time Tracking – Employee

      Project Weekly Time Tracking – Summary

      Project Status Report

      Project Wrap-Up Report

      You should dedicate approximately 3 hours to completing this activity.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.
       

      The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

      Submit Materials

    • Assessment: Oliver F. Lehman’s Project Management Training: “Seventy-Five Test Questions”

      Link: Oliver F. Lehman’s Project Management Training: “Seventy-Five Test Questions” (HTML)
       
      Instructions: This test was designed for the PMP exam.  However, most of the concepts were covered in this course.  Each question in this self-assessment test has one best answer.  You have 90 minutes to complete the assessment.  There is a timer in the title bar (top of most browsers).  Click the dark blue button that says, “Click Here to Restart the Timer and Start the Test” to reset the timer to 00:00:00.

      This assessment should take approximately 1.5 hours to complete.
       
      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.  

  • Final Exam