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  • 1.1 Reading: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Rectilinear Motion”

    Link: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Rectilinear Motion” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Rectilinear kinematics involves the motion of particles in a straight line.  Please read the entire webpage linked above, which will introduce you to rectilinear motion.  This reading will give you a general understanding of motion of particles in one-dimension along a straight line.  Make sure to go over Examples 1 through 6 to understand the practical applications of rectilinear motion; you may access these examples by clicking on the hyperlinks for each.  It may also help to take notes while read this section.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Mehrdad Negahban, and can be viewed in its original form here.  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 1.1 Reading: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Rectilinear Motion” and “Rectilinear Motion-Application”

    Links: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Rectilinear Motion” (PDF) and “Rectilinear Motion-Application” (PDF)
     
    Also Available In:
    iBooks
     
    Instructions: Rectilinear kinematics involves the motion of particles in a straight line.  Please click on both links above, and read each of these articles, which will introduce you to rectilinear motion, in their entirety.  These readings will provide you with a general understanding of motion of particles in one-dimension along a straight line.  Pay particular attention to Example 1 for the “Rectilinear Motion” and Examples 1 through 4 of the “Rectilinear Motion-Application” reading to understand the practical applications of rectilinear motion.  It may also help to take notes while reading these sections.
     
    Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License (HTML).  It is attributed to Sunil Kumar Singh and the original versions can be found here (HTML)

  • 1.2.1 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Lecture 3A- Curvilinear Motion in Cartesian Coordinates”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Lecture 3A- Curvilinear Motion in Cartesian Coordinates” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Curvilinear motion involves the motion of particles along a curved path. In this section we will examine curvilinear motion and its components along x, y, and z direction.  Please click on the link above, and select the link for Lecture 3A, titled “Curvilinear motion in Cartesian Coordinates,” to open the PDF file.  Read the sections of the lecture titled “General Curvilinear Motion” and “Curvilinear Motion: General and Rectangular Components.”  Please take notes as you read this section.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.2.1 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Curvilinear Motion”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Curvilinear Motion” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Curvilinear motion involves the motion of particles along a curved path.  In this section, we will examine curvilinear motion and its components along x, y, and z direction.  Please click on the link above, and read the entire webpage.  Please read the example problem at the bottom of the webpage.  Please make sure to take notes while you read.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.2.1 Reading: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Curvilinear Motion -Rectangular Coordinates”

    Link: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Curvilinear Motion-Rectangular Coordinates” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Curvilinear motion involves the motion of particles along a curved path.  The examples here will help you understand practical applications of curvilinear motion.  Please click on the links for “Example 1,” “Example 2,” and “Example 3,” and attempt the example problems; you may review the solutions after you try each problem.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Mehrdad Negahban, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 1.2.2 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Lecture 3B - Projectile Motion”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Lecture 3B - Projectile Motion” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Motion of a projectile deals with curvilinear motion acted upon by gravity.  For instance, motion of rockets or missiles is considered as projectiles.  Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 3B, titled “Projectile Motion,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Motion of a Projectile.”  It may be beneficial to take notes as you read this section.
     
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  • 1.2.2 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Projectile Motion”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: Projectile Motion” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Motion of a projectile deals with curvilinear motion acted upon by gravity.  For instance, motion of rockets or missiles is considered as projectiles.  Please click on the link above. and read the entire webpage.  Please take notes while reviewing this section.
     
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  • 1.2.2 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Projectile Motion Example-The Physics of Volleyball”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Projectile Motion Example-The Physics of Volleyball” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Motion of a projectile deals with curvilinear motion acted upon by gravity.  Physics of Volleyball is a great example of projectile motion.  Please go through the example to see how projectile motion and its equations can be applied to the real world.  Please click on the link above, and read the entire webpage.  Please take notes while reading this section.
     
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  • 1.2.3 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Curvilinear Motion: Normal and Tangential Components”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Curvilinear Motion: Normal and Tangential Components” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Curvilinear motion can be further broken down into normal (acting towards the center of the curve) or tangential components (perpendicular to normal).  Click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 4, titled “Curvilinear Motion: Normal and Tangential Components,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Curvilinear Motion: Normal and Tangential Components.”  It may be beneficial to take notes as you read this material.
     
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  • 1.2.3 Reading: Wikipedia: “Normal and Tangential Components”

    Link: Wikipedia: “Normal and Tangential Components” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Curvilinear motion can be further broken down into normal (acting towards the center of the curve) or tangential components (perpendicular to normal).  Please click on the link above to go to the Wikipedia article, and then read the entire webpage.  Please take notes on this topic as you read this article.
     
    Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  You can find the original Wikipedia version of this article here (HTML).

  • 1.2.3 Reading: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Normal and Tangential Coordinates”

    Link: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Normal and Tangential Coordinates” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Curvilinear motion can be further broken down into normal (acting towards the center of the curve) or tangential components (perpendicular to normal).  The problems here will help you understand curvilinear motion problems broken down into normal and tangential components from a practical viewpoint.  Please click on the hyperlinks for “Example 1,” “Example 2,” and “Example 3,” and read the example problems.  You may want to attempt solving the problems, and then check your answers against the solutions.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Mehrdad Negahban, and can be viewed in its original form here.  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 1.2.4 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Curvilinear Motion: Cylindrical Components”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Curvilinear Motion: Cylindrical Components” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Cylindrical coordinates are another alternative to express curvilinear motion in addition to normal and tangential component.  Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 5, titled “Curvilinear Motion: Cylindrical Components,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled and “Curvilinear Motion: Cylindrical Components.”
     
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  • 1.3.1 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Absolute Dependent Motion"

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Absolute Dependent Motion” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 6A, titled “Absolute Dependent Motion,” to open the PDF file.  Read the through the entire lecture.  

    Note: When there are two particles in a problem, and we are concerned with how they move in relation to each other, we call it “relative motion.”  Their individual motions might be dependent on one another, as when they are connected somehow, or their motions might be completely independent of one another.  It may help to take notes as you read this material.

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  • 1.3.1 Reading: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Relative Velocity in One Dimension” and “Relative Velocity in One Dimension (Application)”

    Links: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Relative Velocity in One Dimension” (PDF) and “Relative Velocity in One Dimension (Application)” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: When there are two particles in a problem, and we are concerned with how they move in relation to each other, we call it “relative motion.”  Their individual motions might be dependent on one another, as when they are connected somehow, or their motions might be completely independent of one another.  Please click on the above links, and read each PDF in its entirety.  For the “Relative Velocity in One Dimension Application” reading, pay particular attention to Examples 1 through 6.  It may help to take notes as you read these webpages.
     
    Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License (HTML).  It is attributed to Sunil Kumar Singh and the original versions can be found here and here (HTML). 

  • 1.3.2 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Relative Motion With Translating Axes"

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Relative Motion With Translating Axes” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: The reading in this subunit deals with relative motion of two particles, where the frame of reference of the particle’s motion moves relative fixed frame of reference.  Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 6B, titled “Relative Motion With Translating Axes,” to open the PDF file.  Read through the entire lecture.  Please take notes as you read this material
     
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  • 2.1.1 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Newton’s Equations of Motion”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Newton’s Equations of Motion” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 7A, titled “Newton’s Equations of Motion” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Newton’s Laws of Motion.”
               
    Newton’s Second Law is the first of three methods we will use to solve the very reasonable question: “How do we get a particle to accelerate in a particular way?”  This method works for very general problems.
     
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  • 2.1.1 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Newton’s Law of Motion”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Newton’s Law of Motion” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire webpage.  This lecture will introduce you to Newton’s Equation of Motion.  Please take notes as you read this section.
     
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  • 2.1.2 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Newton’s Second Law”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Newton’s Second Law” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire webpage.  This lecture will introduce you to Newton’s Equation of Motion, which is Newton’s second law.  Please take notes as you read this section.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.1.2 Reading: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Equations of Motion for a Particle: Newton’s 2nd Law”

    Link: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Equations of Motion for a Particle: Newton’s 2nd Law” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: The problems here will help you understand the equation of motion and Newton’s second law.  Please click on the links for “Example 1,” “Example 2,” “Example 3,” “Example 4,” “Example 5,” and “Example 6,” and read each of these example problems.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Mehrdad Negahban, and can be viewed in its original form here.  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 2.1.3 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Equation of Motion for a System of Particles”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Equation of Motion for a System of Particles” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 7A, titled “Newton’s Equations of Motion,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Equation of Motion for a System of Particles.”  The reading in this subunit ties the sum of both the internal and external forces acting on the particle to the product of mass and acceleration of the particle. 
     
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  • 2.1.4 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Equations of Motion in Rectangular Coordinates”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Equations of Motion in Rectangular Coordinates” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: In this subunit, the motion of the particle will be expressed in Cartesian coordinate system.  Cartesian coordinate systems are also commonly referred to as coordinates along “X” and “Y” directions in two-dimensions and “X”, “Y”, and “Z” directions in three-dimensions.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 7B, titled “Equations of Motion in Rectangular Coordinates,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Equation of Motion: Rectangular Coordinates.”  It may also help to take notes as you read this material.
     
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  • 2.1.5 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Normal and Tangential Coordinates”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Normal and Tangential Coordinates” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with equation of motion in normal and tangential components like curvilinear motion.  This will help you analyze accelerations and forces in normal and tangential direction.  Please click on the link above, and then select the link to Lecture 8, titled “Equations of Motion in Normal- Tangential Coordinates,” to open the PDF file.   Read the section titled “Equations of Motion: Normal and Tangential Coordinates.”  It may help to take notes as you read this material.
     
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  • 2.1.6 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Cylindrical Coordinates”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Cylindrical Coordinates” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: In addition to analyzing forces in normal and tangential direction, this subunit will help you analyze equations of motion in the radial, traverse, and z direction.  Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 9, titled “Equations of Motion in Cylindrical Coordinates,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Equations of Motion: Cylindrical Coordinates.”  It may help to take notes as you read.
     
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  • 2.1.7 Reading: MIT OpenCourseWare: Dr. Widnall’s “Orbital Motion and Space Mechanics”

    Link: MIT OpenCourseWare: Dr. Widnall’s “Orbital Motion and Space Mechanics” (PDF)
     
    Also available in:
    EPUB

    Instructions: One of applications of Newton’s equation of motion is the determination of forces, velocities, and acceleration needed to launch rockets and satellites and maintain them in orbit.   Please click on the link above, and then scroll down the webpage to Lecture 17.  Please click on the “PDF” hyperlink next to the title “Orbit Transfers and Interplanetary Trajectories”to open the PDF file.  Read the entire file (12 pages).
                
    Terms of Use: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.  It is attributed to Bill Widnall and can be found in its original form here

  • 2.2.1 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Work Done by a Force”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Work Done by a Force” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 10, titled “Work of a Force / Principles of Work and Energy,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Work of a Force.”
        
    Note: This is our second method for solving kinetics problems.  This works quite well when either the forces or the problem itself are position-dependent.  Make sure to take notes while reading this section.
     
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  • 2.2.1 Reading: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Work”

    Link: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Work” (PDF)
     
    Also Available In:
    iBooks
     
    Instructions: This section deals with work and work done by a constant and variable force.  Click on the link above, and read the entire article.  Please pay particular attention to working through problems 1 through 3 to understand the practical application.  Make sure to take notes as you read.
     
    Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License (HTML).  It is attributed to Sunil Kumar Singh and the original version can be found here (HTML).

  • 2.2.1 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Work”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Work” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: This section deals with work and work done by a constant and variable force.  Click on the link above, and read the section titled “Work Done on a Particle.”  Please take notes as you read this section.
     
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  • 2.2.2 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Work and Energy Principle”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Work and Energy Principle” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit will help you understand the work and energy balance of a particle.  Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 10 Notes Summary, titled “Work / Principle of Work and Energy,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Principle of Work and Energy.”  Please take notes as you read this material.
     
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  • 2.2.2 Reading: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Work and Energy”

    Link: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Work and Energy” (PDF)
     
    Also Available In:
    iBooks

    Instructions: This reading will help you to understand the work and energy balance of a particle.  Click on the link above, and read the sections titled “Energy” and “Work and Kinetic Energy.”  Please take notes as you read through this material.
     
    Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License (HTML).  It is attributed to Sunil Kumar Singh and the original versions can be found here (HTML).

  • 2.2.2 Reading: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Work-Energy Relation”

    Link: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Work-Energy Relation” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: The problems here will help you understand work, energy, and interactions between them.  Please click on the links for “Example 1,” “Example 2,” “Example 3,” “Example 4,” and “Example 5,” and read through the example problems.  Try to attempt the problems, and then review their solutions. 

    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Mehrdad Negahban, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 2.2.3 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Work and Energy Principle for a System of Particles”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Work and Energy Principle for a System of Particles” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This reading will help you to understand the work and energy balance of a system of particles.  Please click on the link above, and select the link for Lecture 10 Notes Summary, titled “Work / Principle of Work and Energy,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Principle of Work and Energy for a System of Particles.”
     
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  • 2.2.4 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Power and Efficiency”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Power and Efficiency” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Power deals with capacity of machine or device while efficiency deals with how the machine or devices executes this capacity. Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink under Slide Lecture Notes titled “Power and Efficiency,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section entire lecture.  Make sure you take notes as you read.
     
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  • 2.2.5 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Conservative Forces and Potential Energies”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Conservative Forces and Potential Energies” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with how energy is stored in device and system along certain paths.  Energy stored in an extended or compressed spring is considered potential energy.  Please click on the link above, and then select the link under Slide Lecture Notes titled “Conservative Forces & Potential Energy,” to open the PDF file.  Read the entire lecture.  Make sure to take notes as you read.
     
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  • 2.2.5 Reading: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Conservative Force” and “Potential Energy”

    Links: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Conservative Force” (PDF) and “Potential Energy” (PDF)
     
    Also Available In:
    iBooks (First Reading)
    iBooks (Second Reading)
     
    Instructions:  This subunit deals with how energy is stored in device and system along certain paths.  Click on the links above, and read each of these articles in their entirety.  Pay particular attention to Example 1 for the “Conservative Force” reading.  Make sure to take notes as you read.

    Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License (HTML).  It is attributed to Sunil Kumar Singh and the original versions can be found here and here (HTML)

  • 2.2.5 Reading: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Potential Energy”

    Link: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Potential Energy” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: The problems here will help you understand how potential energy is computed and conserved.  Please read the entire webpage, and also click on the links for “Example 1,” “Example 2,” and “Example 3.”  You may want to attempt these examples before reviewing the solutions.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Mehrdad Negahban, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 2.2.6 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “The Conservation of Energy ”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “The Conservation of Energy” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with how energy balance is maintained when it is converted from one form to another.  Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 12, titled “Conservation Forces/ Potential Energy/Conservation of Energy,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Conservation of Energy.”  It may also help to take notes as you read.
     
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  • 2.2.6 Reading: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Conservation of Energy”

    Link: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Conservation of Energy” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with how energy balance is maintained when it is converted from one form to another.  Click on the link above, and read the entire article.  Please take notes as you read this material.
     
    Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License (HTML).  It is attributed to Sunil Kumar Singh and the original versions can be found here (HTML)

  • 2.3.1 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Linear Impulse and Momentum Principle”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Linear Impulse and Momentum Principle” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Impulse is the action of a force for a short period of time, while momentum deals with the product of mass and velocity of a particle (how much energy is there).  Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 13, titled “Linear Impulse and Momentum / Conservation of Momentum,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Principle of Linear Impulse and Momentum.”

    Note: This is our third method for solving these kinetics problems.  This one works best when the forces and/or the problem are time-dependent.
     
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  • 2.3.1 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Impulse and Momentum”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Impulse and Momentum” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Impulse is the action of a force for a short period of time, while momentum deals with the product of mass and velocity of a particle (how much energy is there).  Please click on the link above, and read entire webpage.  Take notes while reading this section.
     
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  • 2.3.2 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Impulse and Momentum for a System of Particles”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Impulse and Momentum for a System of Particles” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit discusses how linear impulse and momentum are conserved for a particle.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 13, titled “Linear Impulse and Momentum / Conservation of Momentum,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Principle of Linear Impulse and Momentum for a System of Particles.”  Take notes while reading this section.
     
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  • 2.3.3 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Conservation of Momentum for a System of Particles”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Conservation of Momentum for a System of Particles” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit will help you understand the conservation of momentum for a system of particles.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 13, titled “Linear Impulse and Momentum / Conservation of Momentum,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Conservation of Linear Momentum.”  Take notes while reading this section.
     
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  • 2.3.3 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Conservation of Momentum”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Conservation of Momentum” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: This reading will help you to understand the conservation of momentum for a system of particles.  Please click on the link above, and read entire webpage.  Take notes as you read this material.
     
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  • 2.3.4 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Impact”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Impact” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit will help you understand the mechanics of motion when two bodies collide for a short period of time.  Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 14, titled “Impact (collisions),” to open the PDF file.  Read the entire file (2 pages).
     
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  • 2.3.4 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Elastic Collision”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Elastic Collision” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: This reading will help you to understand the mechanics of motion when two bodies collide for a short period of time.  Please click on the link above, and read entire webpage.  It may be beneficial to take notes as you read.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.3.5 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Angular Momentum”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Angular Momentum” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This reading will help you to understand the moment of a particle’s linear momentum.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 15, titled “Angular Momentum/Moment & Angular Momentum/Conservation,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Angular Momentum.”  Take notes as you read this material.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.3.6 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Angular Impulse and Momentum Principle”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Angular Impulse and Momentum Principle” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit discusses how angular impulse and momentum are related and conserved.  Please click on the link above, and select the link for Lecture 15, titled “Angular Momentum/Moment & Angular Momentum/Conservation,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Angular Impulse and Momentum Principles.” Take notes while reading this section.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.3.6 Reading: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Impulse-Momentum Relation”

    Link: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Impulse-Momentum Relation” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: The problems here will help you to understand how impulse and momentum are computed and how they are related.  Please click on the links for “Example 1,” “Example 2,” “Example 3,” and “Example 4.”  Review these problems; you may consider attempting these exercises and then checking your answers against the solutions.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Mehrdad Negahban, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 3.1.1 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Planar Rigid-Body Motion”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Planar Rigid-Body Motion” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit will deal with planar rigid body’s motion, such as translation, rotation, and general plane motion.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 16, titled “Rotation,” to open the PDF file.   Read the section titled “Planar Rigid-Body Motion.”  Please take notes as you read this material.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.1.1 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Rigid Body Dynamics”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Rigid Body Dynamics” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: This subunit will deal with planar rigid body’s motion, such as translation, rotation, and general plane motion.  Please click on the link and read entire webpage.  Make your notes while perusing this section.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.1.1 Reading: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Motion of Rigid Bodies”

    Link: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Motion of Rigid Bodies” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: The problems here will help you understand rigid body motion.  Please click on the links for “Example 1,” “Example 2,” “Example 3,” and “Example 4,” and review each example problem.  You may want to attempt these problems before reviewing the solutions on each of these webpages.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Mehrdad Negahban, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 3.1.2 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Translation”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Translation” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with translating rigid bodies, where all points on the body move with the same velocity and acceleration.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 22 Slide Lecture Notes, titled “Planar Kinetic Equations of Motion / Translation,” to open the PDF file.  Read the sections about “Translation.”  This reading will introduce you the fundamental principles of translation as applied to planar rigid-body motion.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.1.3 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Rotation about a Fixed Axis”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Rotation about a Fixed Axis” (PDF)
               
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 16, titled “Rotation,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Rotation about a Fixed Axis.”  This reading will introduce you to the fundamental principles of rotation about a fixed axis as applied to planar rigid-body motion.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.1.3 Reading: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Rotation”

    Link: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Rotation” (HTML or PDF)
     
    You can access the PDF version from the download tab in the top right corner of the page.
     
    Instructions: This reading will introduce you to the fundamental principles of rotation about a fixed axis as applied to planar rigid-body motion.  Click on the link above, and read the entire webpage.  Make sure to go through the application at the bottom of the webpage.  Take notes as you read this material.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.1.4 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Absolute Motion Analysis”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Absolute Motion Analysis” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit will help you to understand the motion of a rigid body with respect to a fixed point.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 16, titled “Absolute motion,” to open the PDF file.  Read the entire lecture.  Take notes as you read this material.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.2.1 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Instantaneous Center of Zero Velocity”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Instantaneous Center of Zero Velocity” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit will help you to understand point of zero velocity on a rigid body.  Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 18 Summary, titled “Rigid body: instantaneous center of zero velocity,” to open the PDF file.  Read the entire file (3 pages).
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.2.1 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Instant Center”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Instant Center” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: This subunit will help you understand point of zero velocity on a rigid body.  Please click on the link above, and read entire webpage.  Make sure to go over the example at the bottom of the webpage.  Take notes as you read this material.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.2.1 Reading: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Instantaneous Center of Velocity”

    Link: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Instantaneous Center of Velocity” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: These problems will help you to apply the concept of instantaneous center of velocity.  Please read the text on the webpage, and click on the links for “Example 1,” “Example 2,” “Example 3,” and “Example 4,” and review these example problems.  Try to work through each problem before reviewing the solutions on each webpage.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Mehrdad Negahban, and can be viewed in its original form here.  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 3.2.2 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Acceleration”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Acceleration” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit will help you understand acceleration of a rigid body undergoing general plane motion.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 19 Summary, titled “Rigid-body motion: acceleration,” to open the PDF file.  Read the entire file (2 pages).
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.2.3 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Rotating Axes”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Rotating Axes” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit will help you understand motion of particles when the axis is rotating.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 20, titled “Rigid Body: Rotating Axes,” to open the PDF file.  Read the entire file.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.1.1 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Moment of Inertia”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Moment of Inertia” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: In this subsection, you will learn how to compute the moment of inertia needed to compute rotational moment, which is analogous to mass for translating rigid bodies.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 21 Summary Lecture Notes titled “Moment of Inertia,” to open the PDF file.  Read the entire file (3 pages).  It may be beneficial to take notes as you read.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.1.1 Reading: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Moment of Inertia of Rigid Bodies”

    Link: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Moment of Inertia of Rigid Bodies” (PDF)
     
    Also Available In:
    iBooks
     
    Instructions: In this subunit, you will learn how to compute the moment of inertia needed to compute rotational moment, which is analogous to mass for translating rigid bodies.  Click on the link above, and read the entire article.  Take notes as you read this material.
     
    Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License (HTML).  It is attributed to Sunil Kumar Singh and the original versions can be found here (HTML).

  • 4.1.1 Reading: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Mass Moment of Inertia”

    Link: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Mass Moment of Inertia” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: In this subunit, you will learn how to compute the moment of inertia needed to compute rotational moment, which is analogous to mass for translating rigid bodies.  Please read the entire webpage linked above, and then click on the links for “Example 1,” “Example 2,” and “Example 3.”  Try to work through each of these examples, and review their solutions.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Mehrdad Negahban, and can be viewed in its original form here.  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 4.1.1 Reading: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Moment of Inertia of Rigid Bodies-Applications”

    Link: Connexions: Sunil Kumar Singh’s “Moment of Inertia of Rigid Bodies-Applications” (PDF)
     
    Also Available In:
    iBooks
     
    Instructions: In this subunit, you will learn how to apply the moment of inertia needed to compute rotational moment, which is analogous to mass for translating rigid bodies.  Click on the above link, and read the entire webpage.  Take notes as you read this material.
     
    Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License (HTML).  It is attributed to Sunil Kumar Singh and the original versions can be found here (HTML).

  • 4.1.2 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Planar Kinetic Equations of Motion”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Planar Kinetic Equations of Motion” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with translation, rotational, and general plane motion of rigid bodies.  Please click on the link above, and select the link for Lecture 22, titled “Planar Kinetic of Motion,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Planar Kinetic of Motion.”

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.1.2 Reading: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Planar Kinetic Equations of Motion”

    Link: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Equations for Two Dimensional Motion” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: The problems in this subunit will help you to understand the equation of motion for rigid bodies.  Please read the text on the webpage, and click on the links for “Example 1,” “Example 2,” “Example 3,” and “Example 4.”  Try to work through these examples, and then review their solutions.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Mehrdad Negahban, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 4.1.3 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Translation”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Translation” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with the motion of rigid bodies along straight paths.  Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 22, titled “Planar Kinetic Equations of Motion / Translation,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Equations of Motion: Translation.”
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.1.4 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Rotation about a Fixed Axis”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Rotation about a Fixed Axis” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with the motion of rigid bodies around an axis.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 23, titled “Planar Kinetics – Rotation About a Fixed Axis” to open the PDF file.  Read the entire 1-page file.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.1.5 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “General Plane Motion”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “General Plane Motion” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit summarizes the overall equations of motion, including translation and rotation into one.  Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 24 Notes, titled “Planar Kenetics Equations of Motion- General Plane Motion,” to open the PDF file.  Read the entire 1-page file.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.2.1 Reading: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Work Energy Relation for a Rigid Body”

    Link: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Work Energy Relation for a Rigid Body” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with how to compute work and energy for rigid bodies subjected to force and displacement.  This is a technique to analyze mechanics of rigid bodies in addition to Newton’s law of motion. Please click on the link above, and read the entire webpage.  Pay particular attention to Examples 1 through 5.  Take notes as your read this material.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Mehrdad Negahban, and can be viewed in its original form here.  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 4.2.1 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Work”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Work” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: This section deals with work and work done by a constant and variable force.  You may notice you have read the first part of this webpage earlier in subunit 2.2.1.  For this subunit, please read the section titled “Work Done on a Rigid Body.”  Please take notes as you read this material.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.2.2 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Kinetic Energy”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Kinetic Energy” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with the computation of energy when rigid bodies are in motion.  The lecture will introduce you to Kinetic Energy for Rigid Bodies.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 25, titled “Kinetic Energy,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Kinetic Energy.” 
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.2.2 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Kinetic Energy”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Kinetic Energy” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with the computation of energy when rigid bodies are in motion.  The lecture will introduce you to Kinetic Energy for Rigid Bodies.  Click on the link above, and read the section titled “Kinetic Energy for a Rigid Body.”  Take notes as you read this section.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.2.3 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Work Done by a Force”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Work Done by a Force”(PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit helps you understand how work done by a force is computed when it displaces the rigid body.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 25, titled “Kinetic Energy,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “The Work of a Force.”  It may be beneficial to take notes as you read this material.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.2.4 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Work Done by a Couple”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Work Done by a Couple” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with the work done by equal and opposite moments.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 25, titled “Kinetic Energy,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “The Work of a Couple.”  Make you take notes as you read this material.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.2.4 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Work of a Force Couple”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Work of a Force Couple” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with the work done by equal and opposite moments.  You may notice that you have read parts of this webpage in earlier subunits.  For this subunit, please read the section titled “Work of a Force Couple.”  Take notes on this reading.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.2.5 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Work and Energy Principle”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Work and Energy Principle”(PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with how work and energy are interrelated for a rigid body.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 25, titled “Kinetic Energy,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Principle of Work and Energy.”  It may help to take notes as you read this material.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.2.5 Reading: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Work Energy Relation for a Rigid Body”

    Link: University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Dr. M. Negahban’s “Work Energy Relation for a Rigid Body” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: The problems in this subunit will help you to understand how work and energy are computed for rigid bodies and how are they interrelated.  Please read the text on this webpage, and click on the links for “Example 1,” “Example 2,” “Example 3,” “Example 4,” and “Example 5.”  Work through these examples, and then check their solutions on each webpage.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Mehrdad Negahban, and can be viewed in its original form here.  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • 4.2.6 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “The Conservation of Energy”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “The Conservation of Energy”(PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with how work and energy are conserved in energy balance.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 26, titled “Conservation of Energy-Planar Kinetics,” to open the PDF file.  Read the entire 1-page file, and take notes as you read.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.2.6 Reading: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Conservation of Energy”

    Link: Real-world-physics-problems.com: “Conservation of Energy” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with how work and energy are conserved in energy balance.  Click on the link above, and read the section titled “Conservation of Energy for a Rigid Body.”  It may be beneficial to take notes as you read this material.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.3.1 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Linear and Angular Momentum”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Linear and Angular Momentum” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with linear momentum when rigid bodies are translating and with angular momentum when the rigid bodies are subjected to moment (rotated about a fixed axis).  Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 27, titled “Linear and Angular Momentum,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Linear and Angular Momentum,” and take notes on this material.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.3.2 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Principle of Impulse and Momentum”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Principle of Impulse and Momentum” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with the interrelation of impulse and moment for rigid bodies.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 27, titled “Linear and Angular Momentum,” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Principle of Impulse and Momentum,” and take notes on this material.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.3.3 Reading: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Conservation of Momentum”

    Link: Utah State University: Dr. Urroz’s “Conservation of Momentum”(PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with the momentum balance of systems that collide.  Please click on the link above, and then select the hyperlink for Lecture 28, titled “Conservation of Momentum” to open the PDF file.  Read the entire 1-page file, and take notes on this topic.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.3.4 Reading: Oakland University: Dr. Latcha’s “Eccentric Impact”

    Link: Oakland University: Dr. Latcha’s “Eccentric Impact” (PowerPoint)
     
    Instructions: Eccentric impact takes place when two bodies do not collide along a straight line but rather at an angle.  The equations of impulse and momentum have to take into account the angles of impact for rigid bodies undergoing eccentric impact.  Please click on the link above, and select the hyperlink for Lecture 18, titled “Notes” after the title “Impulse and Momentum for Planar Rigid Bodies, Eccentric Impact,” to open the PowerPoint file.  Read the section titled “Eccentric Impact,” and take notes on this material.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 5.1.1 Reading: MIT OpenCourseWare: Dr. Widnall’s “Kinematics of a Rigid Body”

    Link: MIT OpenCourseWare: Dr. Widnall’s “Kinematics of a Rigid Body” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with translation, rotational, and general plane motion of three dimensional objects.  Please click on the link above, and scroll down to Lecture 25.  Then, click on the “PDF” hyperlink after the title “3D Rigid Body Kinematics” to open the PDF file.  Read the entire document (10 pages).  Please note that this resource also covers the topic outlined in sections 5.1.2 and 5.1.3 of this course.  Make your notes while reading this section.
      
    Terms of Use: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.  It is attributed to Bill Widnall and can be found in its original form here

  • 5.2.1 Reading: MIT OpenCourseWare: Dr. Widnall’s “Angular Momentum”

    Link: MIT OpenCourseWare: Dr. Widnall’s “Angular Momentum” (PDF)
     
    Also available in:
    EPUB

    Instructions: This subunit deals with momentum experienced by three dimensional objects when they are rotated about a fixed point.  Please click on the link above, and scroll down to Lecture 26.  Then, click on the “PDF” hyperlink after the title “3D Rigid Body Dynamics: The Inertia Tensor” to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Angular Momentum.”  Take notes as you read this material.

    Terms of Use: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.  It is attributed to Bill Widnall and can be found in its original form here

  • 5.2.2 Reading: MIT OpenCourseWare: Dr. Widnall’s “Kinetic Energy”

    Link: MIT OpenCourseWare: Dr. Widnall’s “Kinetic Energy” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This subunit deals with the energy experienced by three dimensional bodies when they are subjected to motion.  Please click on the link above, and then scroll down to Lecture 27.  Then, click on the “PDF” hyperlink after the title “3D Rigid Body Dynamics: Kinetic Energy, Instability, Equations of Motion”to open the PDF file.  Read the section titled “Kinetic Energy for Systems of Particles” and “Kinetic Energy for 3D Rigid Bodies.”  Take notes as you read this material.

    Terms of Use: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.  It is attributed to Bill Widnall and can be found in its original form here

  • 6.2.1 Reading: Brown University: Dr. A. F. Bower’s “Free Vibration”

    Link: Brown University: Dr. A. F. Bower’s “Free Vibration” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: The problems in this subunit will help you apply principles learned in free vibration of rigid bodies under the application of frictional or non-frictional forces (viscous and non-viscous frictional forces).  Scroll down about 2/3 of the webpage until you reach Example 1.  Please read through “Example 1,” “Example 2,” and “Example 3.”
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 6.2.2 Reading: Brown University: Dr. A. F. Bower’s “Forced Vibration”

    Link: Brown University: Dr. A. F. Bower’s “Forced Vibration” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: The problems in this subunit will help you apply principles learned in forced vibration of rigid bodies under the application of frictional or non-frictional forces (viscous and non-viscous frictional forces).  Please scroll down almost to the bottom of the webpage until you reach the heading “5.4.7 Example Problems in Forced Vibrations,” and read “Example 1,” “Example 2,” and “Example 3.”
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.